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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Jonathan G. Cedarbaum, Benjamin A. Powell, D. Reed Freeman, Leah Schloss and Reed Abrahamson

To analyze the cybersecurity regulations for financial institutions issued by the New York State Department of Financial Services on February 16, 2017.

Abstract

Purpose

To analyze the cybersecurity regulations for financial institutions issued by the New York State Department of Financial Services on February 16, 2017.

Design/methodology/approach

This article summarizes the regulations’ scope and requirements including definition of Covered Entities and substantive requirements including periodic Risk Assessments, cyber policies, dedicated and trained personnel, testing, audit trails, control over Third Party Service Providers, authentication, secure disposal, encryption, and incident reporting.

Findings

The regulations go beyond federal requirements in a number of important respects.

Originality/value

This article provides a guide for regulated entities to start preparing for compliance with the new regulations from experienced lawyers with specialties in cybersecurity, privacy and communications.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2010

Ryan Oprea and Benjamin Powell

Experimental economics has been treated with skepticism by some Austrian economists. We argue that experimental methods are consistent with strong versions of praxeology…

Abstract

Experimental economics has been treated with skepticism by some Austrian economists. We argue that experimental methods are consistent with strong versions of praxeology, and are therefore not methodologically problematic for Austrians. We further argue that experimental research methods have illustrated many uniquely Austrian themes and provide a fruitful method for future Austrian-inspired research.

Details

What is so Austrian about Austrian Economics?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-261-7

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2013

Benjamin C. Powell, Joan M. Donohue, Xiaoya Liang and Jeremy B. Fox

This study aims to provide an exploratory analysis of a broad range of factors that may help to explain the rapid growth of Chinese private owned enterprises (POEs).

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide an exploratory analysis of a broad range of factors that may help to explain the rapid growth of Chinese private owned enterprises (POEs).

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis in this study takes advantage of an archival dataset constructed by the third author from proprietary data collected for a practitioner conference in China.

Findings

Consistent with research on entrepreneurs in Western economies, the individual characteristics of the Chinese founders showed weak correlations with sales growth, but measures of founder motivation did correlate with sales growth. While the results for company characteristics were also weak, most of the factors related to company governance, strategy, competitive advantage, and stakeholder trust all showed significant correlations with the POE's rates of sales growth.

Practical implications

The motivations of Chinese founders appear to matter more than their traits in explaining their ability to grow sales. Solid structure, strategy, and competitive advantages are important also. Building trust with stakeholders may facilitate growth by helping Chinese POEs bridge the institutional voids that they face.

Originality/value

The rapid growth of the Chinese economy and of Chinese POEs offers a unique content in which to study factors that may affect growth rates. However, obtaining reliable data on Chinese POEs is difficult; this study uses a proprietary dataset to offer a rare glimpse into the factors that may affect the sales growth rates of Chinese POEs.

Details

Journal of Chinese Entrepreneurship, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1396

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2010

Abstract

Details

What is so Austrian about Austrian Economics?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-261-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Robert C. Miller

Fiscal support from endowments is a longstanding tradition in many institutions of higher education. The first known endowment in an American academic library resulted…

Abstract

Fiscal support from endowments is a longstanding tradition in many institutions of higher education. The first known endowment in an American academic library resulted from a bequest of £500 from Thomas Hollis to the Harvard College Library in 1774. The number of endowments grew steadily in the 1800s, and by the turn of the century there were significant endowments in many libraries, including Yale, Columbia, the University of Pennsylvania, Brown, the University of Virginia, and the University of North Carolina. Some institutions came to be heavily dependent on trusts for library funding. Between 1928 and 1956, for example, endowment supplied the total budgetary allocation for acquisitions at the Dartmouth College Library. Similarly, as late as the early 1950s, all of the book funds for the Harvard College Library came from its endowment.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2011

H.G.A. Hughes

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Ryan H Murphy and Rick Weber

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between immigration rates and business failure, where business failure is viewed as a proxy for the presence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between immigration rates and business failure, where business failure is viewed as a proxy for the presence of entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

It employs a panel data approach to the USA, using the percentage of the population that is foreign born as the explanatory variable for the business failure rate ten years later.

Findings

The authors find the effect to be large, with a one standard deviation increase in the foreign born population corresponding to a 1.09 standard deviation increase in business failure rate, and the authors argue, entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

The effect the authors find is very large though perhaps also counterintuitive.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Colleen E. Haight and Nikolai G. Wenzel

Subsequent to the First World War, the French Government regulated the Champagne industry, and locked the status of protected (and excluded) grapes into the new…

Abstract

Purpose

Subsequent to the First World War, the French Government regulated the Champagne industry, and locked the status of protected (and excluded) grapes into the new Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée system, forever altering the incentives and output of wine producers. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

As a result, some indigenous varietals have disappeared entirely from the region – and a handful remain only in the vineyards and bottles of a few bold entrepreneurs, constituting less than 1 percent of Champagne production.

Findings

The authors assess several traditional explanations (from taste and preferences to agricultural resilience)-and dismiss them as unconvincing. Instead, the authors adopt a public choice framework of regulatory capture to explain the puzzle of thwarted entrepreneurship and consumer choice.

Originality/value

This paper is original.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2015

Sara Shostak and Jason Beckfield

This chapter compares interdisciplinary research that engages genomic science from economics, political science, and sociology. It describes, compares, and evaluates…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter compares interdisciplinary research that engages genomic science from economics, political science, and sociology. It describes, compares, and evaluates concepts and research findings from new and rapidly developing research fields, and develops a conceptual taxonomy of the social environment.

Methodology/approach

A selection of programmatic and empirical articles, published mostly since 2008 in leading economics, political science, and sociology journals, were analyzed according to (a) the relationship they pose between their discipline and genomic science, (b) the specific empirical contributions they make to disciplinary research questions, and (c) their conceptualization of the “social environment” as it informs the central problematique of current inquiry: gene-environment interaction.

Findings

While all three of the social science disciplines reviewed engage genomic science, economics and political science tend to engage genomics on its own terms, and develop genomic explanations of economic and political behavior. In contrast, sociologists develop arguments that for genomic science to advance, the “environment” in gene-environment interaction needs better theorization and measurement. We develop an approach to the environment that treats it as a set of measurable institutional (rule-like) arrangements, which take the forms of neighborhoods, families, schools, nations, states, and cultures.

Research/implications

Interdisciplinary research that combines insights from the social sciences and genomic science should develop and apply a richer array of concepts and measures if gene-environment research – including epigenetics – is to advance.

Originality/value

This chapter provides a critical review and redirection of three rapidly developing areas of interdisciplinary research on gene-environment interaction and epigenetics.

Details

Genetics, Health and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-581-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Warigia Bowman and Arifa Khandwalla

This essay surveys and synthesizes the academic literature, archival sources and interviews with key policy makers regarding the emergence of community technology centers…

Abstract

This essay surveys and synthesizes the academic literature, archival sources and interviews with key policy makers regarding the emergence of community technology centers in the US. Community Technology Centers (CTCs) came to the fore in the late 1990s through an activist nonprofit sector combined with federal government and private sector funding. Federal data indicates that CTCs now represent the most important access points to information communications technology for the poor in the US. This essay reviews the latest arguments for and against continued investment in CTCs and public access in general. In addition to providing access, which is often used beneficially for employment and education related purposes, CTCs appear to contribute to social capital as they become social gathering points. This paper concludes, that both government and nonprofits play a vital role in ensuring public access for the poor and that continued investment in CTCs is warranted.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

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