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Article

David Heavens, Joanne Hodgekins, Rebecca Lower, Joanne Spauls, Benjamin Carroll, Brioney Gee, Timothy Clarke and Jonathan Wilson

There is an international drive to improve mental health services for young people. This study aims to investigate service user experience of a youth mental health service…

Abstract

Purpose

There is an international drive to improve mental health services for young people. This study aims to investigate service user experience of a youth mental health service in Norfolk, UK. In addition to suggesting improvements to this service, recommendations are made for the development of youth mental health services in general.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods approach was used. Quantitative data from satisfaction questionnaires were analysed using descriptive statistics and compared between two time points. A semi-structured interview was used to generate qualitative data. Thematic analysis was used to identify themes in the interview transcripts and triangulation was used to synthesise quantitative and qualitative data.

Findings

Service users appeared satisfied with the service. Significant improvements in satisfaction were found between two time points. Qualitative analysis identified three main themes that were important to service users, including support, information and personhood.

Practical implications

Recommendations for the development of youth mental health services are provided. Although these are based on findings from the Norfolk youth service, they are likely to apply to other mental health services for young people.

Originality/value

Mental health care for young people requires significant improvement. The Norfolk youth service is one of the first services of its kind in the UK. The findings from this study might be helpful to consider in the development of youth mental health services across the world.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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Abstract

This chapter quotes how St. John, Daun-Barnett, and Moronski-Chapman (2012) maintained ideological shifts in American culture and politics which are important to the study of higher education policy because of the influence on public finance, government regulation, and curriculum. From the Great Depression through the Cold War to the present, human capital theory has guided higher education (St. John et al., 2012). Veiled concepts of accessibility and equity were substantial during this era to mask more nefarious attempts to shift to the privatization away from the public good of American Higher Education (Astin & Oseguera, 2004). This chapter focuses on the role of accountability as a neoliberal ideology, and the impact of this ideology, as a form of corporatization on higher education. Furthermore, this focus on corporatization intersects specifically with the discourse pertaining to corporate social responsibility (CSR), which can be understood as transparent actions that guide an organization to benefit society, such as in funding and accessibility. In this chapter, the authors engage in a critical analysis of neoliberalism, and academic capitalism, as threats to the institution of higher education as a public good. The authors initially provide a framing of the public to private dichotomy of American higher education in explaining the various products produced and expected outcomes. A historical context for performance-based funding in American higher education is provided as an understanding of the nature and scope of the contemporary model. To understand the influence of public funding policies on American higher education, it is also necessary to comprehend the role of political ideology and how the business model of higher education has evolved. Thus, a general discussion of neoliberalism permeates the entirety of this discussion. This chapter concludes with the tertiary impacts of neoliberalism.

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Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Canterbury Sound in Popular Music: Scene, Identity and Myth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-490-3

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Article

Javed Nayyar and S. Sohail H. Naqvi

This study is a theoretical debate on corporate entrepreneurship (CE) in the state government higher education institutions (HEIs) in Pakistan with a generally accepted…

Abstract

Purpose

This study is a theoretical debate on corporate entrepreneurship (CE) in the state government higher education institutions (HEIs) in Pakistan with a generally accepted conceptual model. The objective of the study is to measure the mediation effect of corporate entrepreneurship (CE) on the relationship between the structure, managerial strategy, culture, environment and organizational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The inferential statistic is used in order to achieve the objective of this study. Pearson correlation and multiple regressions are used to analyze the findings. Pearson correlation is used to see any association between the independent variables which are structural factors, managerial factors, cultural factors, and environmental factors and the dependent variable which are organizational performance. The association enables the reader to identify whether there is any relationship between the variables. It showed the strength and direction of the relationship. Meanwhile, a regression test was done to identify the predictive ability of each variable towards the organizational performance construct and mediation.

Findings

This framework of corporate entrepreneurship in the public sector tertiary education sector may have some uncertain assumptions and statements inconsistent with previous research. Nonetheless, the research framework provides a starting point to develop a more applicable corporate entrepreneurship model to higher education management and enhance the quality of public entrepreneurship research.

Social implications

Focusing the effect of mediation between the relationship of four determinant factors, and corporate entrepreneurship on the organizational performance of the schools/faculties of the state government higher education institutions in Pakistan provides some insights for to the schools/faculties' deans into how the integration of some strategies can help in creating the competitive advantage to enhance the overall performance.

Originality/value

The working paper is original in its kind that the framework is presented here is a contribution to the knowledge that fulfill the gap of enhancing performance in the state government higher education institutions in Pakistan by presenting an innovative entrepreneurial mindset.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Content available
Article

Abstract

Details

Management Research News, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article

Gitachari Srikanthan and John F. Dalrymple

This paper aims to develop an overarching basis to consider issues of quality in higher education.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop an overarching basis to consider issues of quality in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

An attempt is made to synthesise different approaches to management in higher education.

Findings

The article concludes that it is possible to synthesise a model, based on existing literature, to uniquely address higher education.

Research limitations/implications

The model developed is a conceptual one as emphasised by the title.

Originality/value

Provides a thought framework for addressing the quality issues in higher education.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article

Jasmin Godemann, Jan Bebbington, Christian Herzig and Jeremy Moon

This paper seeks to create the context within which research into how higher education institutions (HEIs) might engage with the goal of sustainable development. In…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to create the context within which research into how higher education institutions (HEIs) might engage with the goal of sustainable development. In particular, the paper outlines the context in which papers in a special section on this topic might be understood as well as developing propositions for how a research focus might emerge in this area. The paper, therefore, seeks to contribute to discussions about whether, under which circumstances and how social accountability and engagement processes focusing on sustainable development might trigger, frame and/or promote change processes in HEIs. The papers that compose this special section are also introduced and future research avenues offered.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review

Findings

Despite a dearth of literature in the area of HEI responsiveness to sustainable development (and leaving side education/learning and research for sustainable development), numerous points of intersection exist. Foremost among these is the role of HEIs as shapers of the values of society (and a place for debates about these values). In addition, HEIs are substantive organisations with sustainable development impacts. The paper suggests, however, that understanding HEIs and self-consciously seeking change in their activities has to seriously engage with the characterisation of these organisations as loosely coupled systems.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the distinctive characteristics of HEIs and considers the higher education context as a challenging case to explore the capacity of social accountability and stakeholder engagement to foster change towards the goal of sustainable development.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article

Fengru Li and Nader H. Shooshtari

Applying brand names to international markets remains a challenge to multinational corporations. Consumers’ sociolinguistic backgrounds shape their responses to brand…

Abstract

Applying brand names to international markets remains a challenge to multinational corporations. Consumers’ sociolinguistic backgrounds shape their responses to brand names. This paper uses a sociolinguistic approach as a conceptual framework in understanding brand naming and translating in the Chinese market. The approach promotes that sociolinguistics a) recognizes linguistic competence, b) advances symbolic values imbedded in linguistic forms, and c) renders attached social valence to cultural scrutiny. Three brand‐naming cases in China are presented for discussion, which may benefit multinational corporations on brand decisions involving Chinese consumers.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

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Article

Chien Wen Yuan, Benjamin V. Hanrahan and John M. Carroll

Timebanking is a generalized, voluntary service exchange that promotes use of otherwise idle resources in a community and facilitates community building. Participants…

Abstract

Purpose

Timebanking is a generalized, voluntary service exchange that promotes use of otherwise idle resources in a community and facilitates community building. Participants offer and request services through the mediation of the timebank software. In timebanking, giving help and accepting help are both contributions; contributions are recognized and quantified through exchange of time-based currency. The purpose of this paper is to explore how users perceive timebank offers and requests differently and how they influence actual use.

Design/methodology/approach

This survey study, conducted in over 120 timebanks across the USA, examines users’ timebanking participation, adapting dimensions of Technology Acceptance Model (TAM).

Findings

The authors found that perceived ease of use in timebanking platforms was positively associated with positive attitudes toward both requests and offers, whereas perceived usefulness was negatively associated with positive attitudes toward requests and offers. The authors also found that having positive attitudes toward requests was important to elicit behavioral intention to make a request, but that positive attitudes toward offers did not affect behavioral intentions to make offers.

Practical implications

The authors discussed these results and proposed design suggestions for future service exchange tools to address the issues the authors raised.

Originality/value

The study is among the first few studies that examine timebanking participation using large-scale survey data. The authors evaluate sociotechnical factors of timebanking participation through adapting dimensions of TAM.

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