Search results

1 – 10 of over 52000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

José Manuel de la Torre-Ruiz, Maria Dolores Vidal-Salazar and Eulogio Cordón-Pozo

Although previous studies have analyzed the affective reaction of employees toward benefits, results remain inconclusive. The purpose of this paper is to pay specific…

Abstract

Purpose

Although previous studies have analyzed the affective reaction of employees toward benefits, results remain inconclusive. The purpose of this paper is to pay specific attention to the flexibility of benefit systems and analyze whether the effect of this flexibility on employee’s benefit satisfaction is moderated by employees’ personality traits.

Design/methodology/approach

The data of this study have been collected from a sample of 874 employees working in Spanish firms, through survey. The data were analyzed using partial least squares modeling.

Findings

The results of this study show how self-efficacy has a negative moderating effect on the relation between benefit flexibility and benefit-level satisfaction. Similarly, the authors find a negative moderating effect of internal locus of control on the relationship between benefit flexibility and benefit determination satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies should consider other personality traits that have an even stronger moderating effect.

Practical implications

This paper sheds some light on how the flexibility of benefit systems can be an effective source of satisfaction and what kind of employees can be more satisfied with them. For human resource managers, it is necessary to know how differently employees react to human resource practices in order to be able to effectively adjust these practices to the appropriate employees.

Originality/value

This work contributes to human resource literature by analyzing some personality traits that may condition the effectiveness of benefit systems. In this sense, it responds to recent calls asking for more studies aimed at analyzing the role of the employees on the effectiveness of human resource practices.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Yohanes Kristianto, Mian Ajmal, Richard Addo Tenkorang and Matloub Hussain

The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of technology adoption on operational competitiveness by taking an example from international manufacturing companies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of technology adoption on operational competitiveness by taking an example from international manufacturing companies.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops a conceptual model to generate strategic flexibility and benefit for a manufacturing firm by managing manufacturing strategy and technology adoption with different leadership roles.

Findings

The results show that the leadership role is a significant factor to motivate strategic flexibility and generate higher benefit. For intellectuals, the mechanism provides a new approach to explicate technology adoption in a manufacturing company. Besides, it provides a deep‐rooted preliminary point for supplementary empirical assessment. The mechanism facilitates managers to expand their understanding of the leadership role for trust building and knowledge sharing in manufacturing firms.

Practical implications

With that enhanced understanding, the managers can spotlight their actions, which help further to perk up their firm's competitiveness provoked by supporting the knowledge sharing activities through appropriate leadership roles.

Originality/value

The mechanism developed in this study is believed to be the first sober effort to provide a deeper theoretical understanding of trust building for improving operational competitiveness in manufacturing firms with a practical approach.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

M. Dolores Vidal-Salazar , Eulogio Cordón-Pozo and José M. de la Torre-Ruiz

The purpose of this paper is to analyze three different forms of benefit systems and the effects of their application on Spanish firms’ attraction and retention capacity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze three different forms of benefit systems and the effects of their application on Spanish firms’ attraction and retention capacity, differentiating these systems depending on the flexibility offered to the workers.

Design/methodology/approach

The data of this study have been collected from a sample of 308 human resources managers in Spanish firms, through an online questionnaire. The hypotheses were tested by ordinary least squares regression analyses.

Findings

The results show that firms having more flexible compensation systems, that is, those providing greater freedom to workers in the election of their benefits and the design of the benefit system, reported to have a higher attraction and retention capacity than firms offering to their employees a unique and similar benefit package for all the employees.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies could extent this study by analyzing different contexts in order to determine whether some institutional factors can influence these results. Similarly, it would be interesting to analyze the effects of these systems on other organizational outcomes, such as their financial performance.

Practical implications

Human resources policies and, especially, compensation policies have a significant influence on the ability of firms to recruit and retain core employees, necessary for corporate success. This study sheds light on the effectiveness of different benefits systems in enhancing the firms’ capacities to attract and retain core employees. Taking into account the hard financial and labor environment that the Spanish firms have to face, the results of this study can have important implications for managers.

Originality/value

This paper responds to recent calls asking for the necessity of analyzing the effect of different benefit systems in contexts different to the broadly considered American context. Similarly, these results could be applied to other countries with conditions similar to Spain, that is, countries where the benefit systems have been traditionally less flexible and with an offer of benefits quite different than firms located in countries where the State offers a less-social assistance to citizens.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2020

Barbara Gaudenzi, George A. Zsidisin and Roberta Pellegrino

Firms can choose from an array of approaches for reducing the detrimental financial effects caused by unfavorable fluctuations in commodity prices. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Firms can choose from an array of approaches for reducing the detrimental financial effects caused by unfavorable fluctuations in commodity prices. The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance for effectively estimating the financial effects of mitigating commodity price risk volatility (CPV) in supply chain management decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts two prominent and complementary methodologies, namely, total cost of ownership (TCO and real options valuation (ROV), to illustrate how commodity price risk mitigation strategies can be analyzed with respect to their effect on costs and performance. The paper provides insights through a case study to demonstrate the application of these methods together and establish the benefits and challenges associated with their implementation.

Findings

The paper illustrates advantages and disadvantages of TCO and ROV and how these approaches can be adopted together to contribute to effective purchasing decisions. Supply chain flexibility is a key capability but requires investments. Holistically measuring the financial effects of flexibility investments is imperative for gaining executive management support in mitigating commodity price volatility.

Research limitations/implications

This study can provide supply chain professionals with useful guidance for measuring the costs and benefits related to developing strategies for mitigating commodity price volatility. TCO provides a focus on the costs associated with the commodity purchasing process, and ROV enables the aggregation of all the costs and benefits associated with the use of the strategy and synthesizes them into the net value estimate.

Originality/value

The paper provides a comparison of different but complementary approaches, specifically TCO and ROV, for analyzing the effectiveness of CPV risk mitigation decisions. In addition, these two methods allow supply chain professionals to evaluate and control the financial effects of CPV risk, particularly the impact of mitigation on firm’s cash flows.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Stephen Kim, Namwoon Kim, Jae H. Pae and Leslie Yip

This study aims to examine the strategic implications and managerial outcomes of the concurrent use of cooperation and competition in vertical channel relationships.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the strategic implications and managerial outcomes of the concurrent use of cooperation and competition in vertical channel relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a structured questionnaire to gather data regarding vertical channel relationships in China.

Findings

Whereas the academic literature has emphasized cooperation between channel members because of the interdependence between them, in reality, retailers may accept competition as just another part of doing business with suppliers.

Research limitations/implications

The outcome variables used may not be comprehensive. In particular, the authors choose the flexibility of channel resources to stand for private benefits and joint benefits to represent common benefits, and though these variables certainly represent the intended benefits of the ambidextrous strategy, it remains to be seen whether other benefits may emerge for the exchange parties in vertical relationships.

Practical implications

Using an ambidextrous strategy does not damage relationship quality, though it certainly does not enhance it. This view is based on the notion that an ambidextrous strategy at least does not harm either common or private benefits. Therefore, exchange parties using the ambidextrous strategy should not experience a relationship that is worse than that which results when they use cooperation or competition alone. The results of the current study indicate that this view reflects reality more accurately.

Originality/value

The value of the current study centers on the application of a conceptual framework regarding ambidextrous strategy to vertical channel relationships in a developing economy.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 October 2018

Svante Schriber, David R. King and Florian Bauer

The purpose of this paper is to develop the role of integration flexibility as a mediator of acquisition performance and demonstrate how this capability varies across firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop the role of integration flexibility as a mediator of acquisition performance and demonstrate how this capability varies across firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The study develops a conceptual framework of anticipated relationships by building on existing but so far unintegrated acquisition research.

Findings

The study suggests integration flexibility provides an explanation for variance in acquisition performance. The study identifies drivers behind acquisition integration flexibility in acquirer characteristics, deal characteristics and integration management. The authors further specify the positive and negative impact of several key factors commonly discussed in acquisition research.

Research limitations/implications

Integration flexibility stands out as a novel explanation for acquisition performance. Still, the benefits from flexibility are not universal and developed logic suggests it represents a dynamic capability for acquirers. Our framework helps predict which acquirers and deals are more likely demonstrating this capability, thus contributing to predict acquisition performance.

Practical implications

Acquisitions often take place in dynamic environments and reportedly often fail. Predicting and developing acquisition integration flexibility stands out as an important task for acquiring management.

Social implications

Annual global acquisition values are on par with the GDP of large industrial nations (e.g. Germany) and failures for reasons of lacking acquisition integration flexibility contributes to value destruction harming not only firms, but society at large. Improved integration flexibility likely mediates this risk.

Originality/value

Making an acquisition to adapt to environmental change implicitly assumes greater integration that can limit flexibility. While our argument builds on key concepts from acquisition research these so far have remained unconnected in relation to acquisition integration flexibility. The authors develop factors influencing this important capability and show how it mediates acquisition performance. This links acquisition antecedents with integration or phases typically treated separately.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Richard Cardinali

Discusses flexible manufacturing systems (FMS) and measures thebenefits of substituting production flexibility for inventory. Comparesthe trade‐offs that arise in balanced…

Abstract

Discusses flexible manufacturing systems (FMS) and measures the benefits of substituting production flexibility for inventory. Compares the trade‐offs that arise in balanced operations, graphical models and some of the associated risks of flexible manufacturing implementation, operation and management. Also addresses the question of selecting flexibility over other techniques as well as benefits which flexibility provides. Examines a brief comparison between traditional and flexible manufacturing. Examples include illustrations of the benefits of FMS and cost flexibility, plus a view of the future role of FMS.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 October 2007

Stephen Kelly

This paper aims to critique the foundations of the relationship benefits concept and develop a theoretical model that is tested and validated.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to critique the foundations of the relationship benefits concept and develop a theoretical model that is tested and validated.

Design/methodology/approach

A series of exploratory in‐depth interviews were initially conducted and the results considered against extant literature. This was followed by a mail survey of the selected population that resulted in 254 usable responses that represented an effective response rate of 21.4 per cent.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that relationship benefits sought by small firms collaborating with larger partners can be classified as cost, service, image and flexibility benefits and suggest that their transfer can facilitate improved small firm competitiveness by building capabilities and resources. It is concluded that this classification of relationship benefits provides a clearer understanding of how value is transferred to small firms engaged in rich and deep relationships.

Originality/value

The classification presented in this paper provides practitioners with a framework for comparing benefit packages offered by partners. In doing so it also provides small firms with a conceptual model that facilitates the application of relationship benefits to the building of competencies underpinning competitiveness in selected markets.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

D. Baccarini and G. Bateup

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how benefits management is applied to office fit‐out projects, in terms of benefits identification, benefits planning, benefits

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how benefits management is applied to office fit‐out projects, in terms of benefits identification, benefits planning, benefits control and benefits realisation.

Design/methodology/approach

Three case studies, based in Perth (Western Australia) are investigated based on structured interviews with the project sponsor; and analysis of secondary documentation, such as business cases, briefs, and post‐occupancy evaluations.

Findings

There is no coherent, holistic application of benefits management models in office fit‐out projects. There are fragments of benefits management evident from the research, such as benefits identification and planning within business cases and briefs, and benefits realisation through post‐occupancy evaluations.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on three case studies, so it is not possible to draw any strong generalisations. Future studies are needed to corroborate or contradict the findings in this research.

Practical implications

The results highlight some aspects of benefits management in office fit‐out projects that could be improved, particularly the setting of key performance indicators for benefits, and more formal benefits control and realisation processes.

Originality/value

This research is the first to take the construct of benefits management, which is primarily applied to information systems projects, and investigate its application in building projects.

Details

Facilities, vol. 26 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Fernando de Zúñiga

Purpose – This paper intends to respond the question that comes up to CRE managers when they consider the outsourcing technique for their CRE management and portfolio. The…

Abstract

Purpose – This paper intends to respond the question that comes up to CRE managers when they consider the outsourcing technique for their CRE management and portfolio. The question, if it is possible to capture in the outsourcing contract sufficient flexibility to meet the changing needs of the business and add value, addresses the existing debate on flexibility arguing the suitability of the outsourcing structures for corporates portfolio. Design/methodology/approach – The paper undertakes a methodological analysis, considering the main outsourcing deals in the UK and continental Europe and discussing the main theories on management outsourcing. Theories of flexibility of CRE portfolios are considered and the main characteristics of the new REPs discussed. Findings – The paper finds that it is possible to capture in the outsourcing contract sufficient flexibility to meet the changing needs of the business and add value because a contract can capture all the flexibility desired and iit would add value as the properties would be used efficiently. Two outsourcing contracts in the UK are explained in two case studies, which support this. Originality/value – The paper suggests methods to outsource CRE portfolios and obtain adequate flexibility to add value to shareholders.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 52000