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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Soyoung Joo, Ben Larkin and Nefertiti Walker

The purpose of this paper is to explore the corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices of three major professional sport leagues in South Korea to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices of three major professional sport leagues in South Korea to investigate the general beliefs, values, and norms influencing the institutional isomorphism of CSR engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with three league chiefs of CSR initiatives and senior managers of related divisions to explore the general beliefs, values, and norms that are institutionalized in their CSR practices. The Gioia method of inquiry and data analysis was employed.

Findings

Using institutional theory, the current research found evidence of all three institutional pressures of institutional isomorphism that contribute to the institutionalization of CSR practices in professional South Korean sport. The data revealed that CSR has been institutionalized in these leagues through isomorphic pressures – coercive, mimetic, and normative – as antecedents to their CSR practices.

Practical implications

The current research identified that conforming to the institutional norms may not only act as a force causing the organization to behave in a socially responsible manner, but also to provide the organization with competitive advantages.

Originality/value

The authors extend the current literature in sport CSR by using institutional theory as a framework to uncover organizational CSR motives. In particular, this is the first study to provide evidence of how three isomorphic pressures work to institutionalize CSR practices in South Korean professional sports leagues.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Batia Ben-Hador and Eyal Eckhaus

This study relates to two levels of organization social capital (SC): personal SC and intra-organizational SC. Personal SC is the utility derived from the person’s…

Abstract

Purpose

This study relates to two levels of organization social capital (SC): personal SC and intra-organizational SC. Personal SC is the utility derived from the person’s relationship, and his positioning in networks, inside and out of the organization. Intra-organizational SC is the benefit derived from interactions within, and between groups in the organization, and is based on trust, reciprocity, common goals, sharing information and knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to examine the difference between the SC levels by their connections to employee energy and success, before and after crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to test the hypotheses, the authors used the Enron e-mails corpus, the texts were analyzed using SQL.

Findings

The findings suggest that the impact of personal SC and intra-organizational SC, on employee energy and success is different. Personal SC was found to have a higher impact on those two variables, than intra-organizational SC. After crisis, this gap became larger.

Originality/value

The importance of the findings is in the distinction between the SC levels, and their different impact on the employees. However, the situation of Enron employees at that time implies that the more important level of SC is the intra-organizational SC.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Abstract

Details

Flapjacks and Feudalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-389-5

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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2015

Tova Band-Winterstein, Hila Avieli and Yael Smeloy

In face of global deinstitutionalization policy, some aging parents find themselves confronting violence and crime in the family due to abusive behavior from their adult…

Abstract

Purpose

In face of global deinstitutionalization policy, some aging parents find themselves confronting violence and crime in the family due to abusive behavior from their adult child with mental disorder. The aim of this paper is to explore and understand the meaning given by aging parents to this deviant behavior and the different ways in which they cope with a lifetime in the shadow of violence.

Design/Methodology/Approach

Data collection was performed through in-depth semi-structured interviews with 16 parents, followed by content analysis.

Findings

Three themes that expressed the meaning attributed to life with ACMD in the shadow of violence: (1) constructing parental identity in a shared reality of violence, (2) social and family networks as a resource in coping with ACMD, and (3) keeping a daily life routine as an anchor in a vulnerable, abusive relationship

Practical Implications

Intervention with such families should focus on the life review process as a therapeutic tool. Interventions should also provide a “safety belt,” including health services, public social networks, and knowledge regarding their right for self-protection.

Originality/Value

Old age becomes an arena for redefined relationships combining increased vulnerability, needs of both sides, and its impact on the well-being of the ageing parents. This calls for better insights and deeper understanding in regard to intervention with such families.

Details

Violence and Crime in the Family: Patterns, Causes, and Consequences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-262-7

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

John F. Preble and Richard C. Hoffman

The purpose of this study is to employ the concepts of the general management of innovation to help explain the extraordinary inventiveness of the Shaker religious community.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to employ the concepts of the general management of innovation to help explain the extraordinary inventiveness of the Shaker religious community.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilizing historical accounts of Shaker philosophy and practice, the paper examines Shaker innovativeness through the lens of the general management of innovation in order to develop a historical interpretation of innovation within the Shaker community.

Findings

It was demonstrated that Shaker society possessed a large number of the organizational characteristics, management practices, and values, which have subsequently been found to be positively related to innovative behaviors in modern institutions.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should examine in even greater depth specific values, structure, and practices of Shaker communities as well as focusing on key concepts in other fields such as product, operations, or R&D management to yield additional insights into the management of innovation within organizations.

Practical implications

The paper discusses several managerial actions derived from an examination of Shaker practices related to the general management of innovation that are relevant for contemporary organizations.

Originality/value

This study uses the extant history of Shaker society to examine, illustrate, and help explain contemporary general management of innovation. This exposition should help inform organizations interested in improving their efforts at spurring successful innovation.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Michael Romanos

This paper aims to provide a selection of poetry titles from the Poets House Showcase of 2005.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a selection of poetry titles from the Poets House Showcase of 2005.

Design/methodology/approach

This article gives a review of the 2005 Poetry Publication Showcase.

Findings

This review represents a wide‐ranging selection of contemporary poetry collections and anthologies.

Originality/value

This list documents the tremendous range of poetry publishing from commercial, independent and university presses as well as letterpress chapbooks, art books and CDs in 2004 and early 2005.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 31 March 2015

Daniel P. S. Goh

In Weberian scholarship, conventional wisdom views the corruption of the modern rational-legal bureaucratic state by local patrimonialisms as an endemic feature in…

Abstract

In Weberian scholarship, conventional wisdom views the corruption of the modern rational-legal bureaucratic state by local patrimonialisms as an endemic feature in non-Western postcolonial state formation. The resultant neopatrimonial state is often blamed for the social, political, and economic ills plaguing these societies. This essay challenges conventional wisdom and argues that neopatrimonialism is a process of hybrid state formation that has its origins in the cultural politics of colonial state building. This is achieved by drawing on a comparative study of British Malaya and the American Philippines, which offers contrastive trajectories of colonialism and state formation in Southeast Asia.

Because of the precariousness of state power due to local resistance and class conflicts, colonial state building involved the deepening of patron–client relations for political control and of rational-legal bureaucracy for social development. In the process, local political relations were marked and displaced as traditional patrimonialisms distinguished from the new modern center. Through native elite collaborators and paternal-populist discourses, new patron–client relations were institutionalized to connect the colonial state to the native periphery. However, colonial officials with different political beliefs and ethnographic world views in the center competed over native policy and generated cyclical crises between patron-clientelist excess and bureaucratic entrepreneurship.

Instead of the prevailing view that postcolonial states are condemned to their colonial design, and that authoritarian rule favors economic development, my study shows that non-Western state formation is non-linear and follows a cyclical pattern between predation and developmentalism, the excesses of which could be moderated.

Details

Patrimonial Capitalism and Empire
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-757-4

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 March 2017

Kenneth M. Moffett

Abstract

Details

Forming and Centering
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-829-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Mike Schraeder and Dennis R. Self

Mergers and acquisitions (M&As) are becoming a strategy of choice for organizations attempting to maintain a competitive advantage. Corporations spend billions of dollars…

Abstract

Mergers and acquisitions (M&As) are becoming a strategy of choice for organizations attempting to maintain a competitive advantage. Corporations spend billions of dollars annually in pursuit of this strategy; the success rate, however, is less than commendable. Research offers a number of potential determinants for this success rate. Receiving increased attention and research, organizational culture is one factor identified as a potential catalyst to M&A success. This article reviews related literature to identify some underlying reasons why organizational culture is an important factor in regard to the success rate of M&As. Specific emphasis is placed on cultural implications to consider prior to the merger or acquisition (event) and implications to consider subsequent to the event. Strategic alternatives suggested by researchers in organizational change, organizational strategy, and organizational development/ management research are also synthesized in an attempt to offer a comprehensive perspective on ways that organizations might improve the success rate of M&As.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Daniel T. Holt, Dennis R. Self, Alfred E. Thal and Steven W. Lo

A sample of 339 employees embroiled in a major organizational change completed a survey that was designed to explore how specific change messages (e.g. appropriateness…

Abstract

A sample of 339 employees embroiled in a major organizational change completed a survey that was designed to explore how specific change messages (e.g. appropriateness, valence, and management support) and change facilitation strategies (participation and training) relate to the perceptions of the change benefits and quality of information conveyed. Results indicated that appropriateness and extrinsic valence were strong predictors of perceptions of change benefits while supervisor support and extrinsic valence most influenced perceptions of information quality. Results further indicated that participation and training were related to perceptions of information quality. However, contrary to our expectations, participation was inversely related to the benefits of the change. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for practitioners and researchers.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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