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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

Tom Platteau, Roger Pebody, Nia Dunbar, Tim Lebacq and Ben Collins

Chemsex is a phenomenon that has gained increasing attention in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to differentiate chemsex from other sexualized substance use…

Abstract

Purpose

Chemsex is a phenomenon that has gained increasing attention in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to differentiate chemsex from other sexualized substance use, and clarify differences between recreational and problematic chemsex use. Despite plentiful publications, little has been published on underlying determinants that predispose individuals to chemsex, and their process toward problematic chemsex use.

Design/methodology/approach

During the second European Chemsex Forum, people who engage in chemsex, community organizers, researchers, clinicians, therapists, social workers and (peer) counselors discussed potential pathways to problematic chemsex. In this manuscript, we translate findings from these discussions into a framework to understand the initiation and process toward problematic chemsex.

Findings

Six stages (loneliness and emptiness, search for connection, sexual connection, chemsex connection, problematic chemsex and severe health impact) and a set of factors facilitating the transition from one stage to the next have been identified.

Originality/value

It is hoped that this “Journey towards problematic chemsex use” will stimulate reflection and debate, with the ultimate goal of improving prevention and care for people engaging in chemsex.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2014

Grit Laudel, Martin Benninghoff, Eric Lettkemann and Elias Håkansson

Evolutionary developmental biology is a highly variable scientific innovation because researchers can adapt their involvement in the innovation to the opportunities…

Abstract

Evolutionary developmental biology is a highly variable scientific innovation because researchers can adapt their involvement in the innovation to the opportunities provided by their environment. On the basis of comparative case studies in four countries, we link epistemic properties of research tasks to three types of necessary protected space, and identify the necessary and facilitating conditions for building them. We found that the variability of research tasks made contributing to evolutionary developmental biology possible under most sets of authority relations. However, even the least demanding research depends on its acceptance as legitimate innovation by the scientific community and of purely basic research by state policy and research organisations. The latter condition is shown to become precarious.

Details

Organizational Transformation and Scientific Change: The Impact of Institutional Restructuring on Universities and Intellectual Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-684-2

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Abstract

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Marginalized Mothers, Mothering from the Margins
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-400-8

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

B.W.A. Ben Dewald

The purpose of this paper is to examine how sommeliers influence wine sales in US restaurants and to understand how US restaurant sommeliers sell wine to customers, select…

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2139

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how sommeliers influence wine sales in US restaurants and to understand how US restaurant sommeliers sell wine to customers, select for the wine list, and keep current on wines.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 250 telephone interviews among people at fine restaurants who were in charge of the selection and recommendation of wines for customers was reviewed. Fine restaurants were selected from wine spectator's “Gold Medal Winners” list and supplemented by Zagat's top 2,000 restaurants. The interviews averaged 29 minutes in length.

Findings

On an average, customers ask a sommelier to provide wine recommendations 38 per cent of the time and sommeliers volunteer wine recommendations 42 per cent of the time. While wine is becoming increasingly popular and consumers are more knowledgeable, sommeliers play an important role in identifying best products available to meet restaurant customers' expectations.

Practical implications

Sommeliers play an important role in influencing the sale of wine in restaurants, in particular, in smaller restaurants and in fine dining restaurants. Focusing on value for money, winery reputation, type of variety and tracking customer preference are all critical factors that respondents considered when selecting wines and when recommending wines to customers.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the advantage of employing a sommelier in fine dining restaurants, given that when there is a designated sommelier more parties order wine (an average 76 per cent vs an average 70 per cent), the average check is higher ($62 vs $55) and the wine list is updated more frequently. Fine dining restaurant managers, owners and sommeliers will find value in this paper.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2009

Tauno Kekäle

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154

Abstract

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Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2018

Raymond Powell, James Kennell and Christopher Barton

Dark tourism is a topic of increasing interest, but it is poorly understood when considering its significance for mainstream and commercial tourism. The purpose of this…

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1504

Abstract

Purpose

Dark tourism is a topic of increasing interest, but it is poorly understood when considering its significance for mainstream and commercial tourism. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the significance of dark tourism in the top ten most visited European tourist cities and propose a dark tourism index for Europe’s tourism cities.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from the websites of the cities’ Destination Management Organisations (DMOs) using a content analysis methodology, based on keywords related to dark tourism taken from the research literature in this area. Descriptive statistics were produced and the variance between the frequencies of keywords related to each city was analysed for statistical significance. These results were then used to construct a darkness ranking of the cities.

Findings

There are significant differences in the extent to which dark tourism products and services are promoted by the DMOs of Europe’s top ten most visited European cities. The ranking of cities by darkness does not correspond to the ranking by visitor numbers, and further qualitative analysis suggests that, that the ranking is also independent of the actual presence of dark sites within the destination. This implies that European city DMOs are engaging with the emerging dark tourism market with to varying degrees.

Research limitations/implications

The purposive sample of ten cities can be extended in future research to increase the validity of the findings of this paper. A further limitation is the selection of keywords for content analysis, which have been developed following the literature review contained below. Future research could develop an extended list of keywords using a systematic review process.

Practical implications

This paper shows that it is possible to create a ranking of tourist cities in terms of their darkness, and that this methodology could be extended to a much larger sample size. This links dark tourism research to the urban tourism literature and also offers possibilities for creating a global ranking that could be used by destinations to judge their success in engaging with the dark tourism market, as well as by tour operators seeking to develop products for the same market.

Social implications

This paper will offer DMO’s and others the opportunity to hone their tourism products more effectively in a way which offers a better understanding of tourism, and therefore provides for better management of its issues.

Originality/value

Dark tourism is a growing niche area of study, and this paper seeks to provide a framework to better understand supply-side aspects of it.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1983

T. SAVAGE

The 3rd international Aircraft Maintenance Engineering Exhibition and Congress, AIRMEC 83, was staged in Düsseldorf for the first time. The space‐city style raised…

Abstract

The 3rd international Aircraft Maintenance Engineering Exhibition and Congress, AIRMEC 83, was staged in Düsseldorf for the first time. The space‐city style raised walkways, with their oval glass roofing, which link the halls and buildings of the Düsseldorf Exhibition Centre, made an appropriate setting for an Exhibition of modern Aerospace technology. The Exhibition occupied a stand space of approximately 3,000 sq. metres. The displays offered a comprehensive picture of current developments in the servicing and overhauling of aircraft of all kinds. AIRMEC 83 attracted exhibitors from 15 countries. Of the 110 companies taking part, 45 were from West Germany. Britain had the second largest group, with 18 stands covering a floor space of 352 m2. Thirteen of the British contingent were grouped together in a British Joint Venture organised by the British Overseas Trade Board. Visiting the various stands, I found that most of the exhibitors were pleased not only with the attendance figures (2,500), but also with the quality of the visitors. Those attending the show came from 34 countries, and were, almost without exception, members of the technical management of their company or were sales executives. More than half were from establishments with more than a thousand employees. However, on the Friday, which was the last day, a number of exhibitors were complaining about the timing of the Conference in relation to the exhibition. The Conference ended on the Thursday lunch‐time, as a result, attendance at the Exhibition was somewhat sparse on the Friday morning and virtually non‐existent in the afternoon. Many exhibitors felt that the Conference should have been spread over the full period of the Exhibition. During the Conference, experts from 10 countries delivered a total of 32 lectures on aircraft maintenance and overhauling. These ranged from a series of lectures on hangars to training of personnel, design of engine maintenance and computer‐aided maintenance and spares management. The knowledge gained was not only of significance for airlines of developing and emerging industrial countries that have no sophisticated maintenance facilities of their own, but also to long‐established airlines. In times of dwindling profits, every airline has to keep a careful eye on possibilities for cutting operating expenditure, whilst at the same time ensuring optimum safety of the aircraft. Through the international exchange of experience and the presentation of new maintenance techniques, AIRMEC greatly contributed to the achievement of this objective.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 55 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Staša Milojević and Selma Šabanović

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the conceptual foundations and motivation for creating a digital archive to display the developments in the field of robotics…

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1599

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the conceptual foundations and motivation for creating a digital archive to display the developments in the field of robotics over the past 50 years.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes that the archive should be based on the conceptualization of science as an “ecology of knowledge”, composed of diverse sets of human and nonhuman actors evolving through associations across multiple social, epistemic, and temporal units of organization. The paper also discusses the roles of different data sources as memory practices primarily used in situated and systemic studies of science.

Findings

The paper shows the value of using full capabilities of the current technology to allow for non‐linear representations of the material within a digital archive.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the discussion of the implications of new information technologies such as digital archives for memory practices in science studies and the sciences.

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Karen Fitzgerald and Louise Biddle

Improving early diagnosis of cancer through system change initiatives is endemic in England’s NHS cancer services. These initiatives, however, often fail to gain traction…

Abstract

Purpose

Improving early diagnosis of cancer through system change initiatives is endemic in England’s NHS cancer services. These initiatives, however, often fail to gain traction due to the complexities of health system structures. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether using a change framework grounded in systems thinking could be of help to system leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

A portfolio of geographically independent projects, all implementing cancer service changes as part of the Accelerate, Coordinate, Evaluate Programme, was used for the study. Eight projects were purposively selected to give a varied case-mix. Two semi-structured interviews were conducted with each project. Analysis of interviews was carried out using the Framework Method.

Findings

Processes working for (growth processes) and against (limiting processes) change were evident in and common across all eight projects. Projects commonly encountered challenges of relevance, time and bounded thinking. Having a network of committed people was vital for both initiating and sustaining change. Furthermore, understanding stakeholders’ emotional responses to change helped mitigate emergent challenges.

Practical implications

Leaders should pay constant attention to the dynamics of change, taking time to anticipate and diffuse challenges whilst simultaneously working to create the conditions that help change flourish. A change framework rooted in complex systems theory can help leaders understand the contradictory and non-linear processes inherent in transformational change.

Originality/value

Few studies seek to understand change dynamics by comparing the experiences of separate change initiatives implemented contemporaneously. The findings offer leaders practical insights on how to implement transformation.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2011

Erin C. Conrad and Raymond De Vries

Neuroscience, with its promise to peer into the brain and explain the sources of human behavior and human consciousness, has captured the scientific, clinical, and public…

Abstract

Neuroscience, with its promise to peer into the brain and explain the sources of human behavior and human consciousness, has captured the scientific, clinical, and public imaginations. Among those in the thrall of neuroscience are a group of ethicists who are carving out a new subspecialty within the field of bioethics: neuroethics. Neuroethics has taken as its task the policing of neuroscience. By virtue of its very existence, neuroethics presents a threat to its parent field bioethics. In its struggle to maintain authority as the guardian of neuroscience, neuroethics must respond to criticisms from bioethicists who see no need for the subspecialty. We describe the social history of neuroethics and use that history to consider several issues of concern to social scientists, including the social contexts that generate ethical questions and shape the way those questions are framed and answered; strategies used by neuroethicists to secure a place in an occupational structure that includes life scientists and other ethics experts; and the impact of the field of neuroethics on both the work of neuroscience and public perceptions of the value and danger of the science of the brain.

Details

Sociological Reflections on the Neurosciences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-881-6

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