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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Richa Chaudhary

The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of employees’ corporate social responsibility (CSR) perceptions on their turnover intentions. It strives to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of employees’ corporate social responsibility (CSR) perceptions on their turnover intentions. It strives to understand the underlying psychological mechanisms by proposing and testing mediation and moderation hypotheses. Specifically, employee engagement was examined as mediator and gender, belief in the importance of CSR and CSR awareness were examined as moderators of the proposed relationship between CSR and turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The target population for the study consisted of junior, middle and senior business professionals from both public and private sector manufacturing and service firms operating in India. The data were collected with the help of self-administered questionnaires via both personal visits to the organizations and internet-based questionnaire. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the study hypotheses.

Findings

The study results suggest a significant influence of employees’ CSR perceptions on their turnover intentions. Additionally, the study delineates the role of employee engagement in understanding the potential of a firm’s involvement in CSR activities in influencing employee attitudes and behaviour at work. Interestingly, significant gender variations were observed in the proposed set of relationships. Belief in the importance of CSR and CSR awareness were also found to significantly moderate the relationship between CSR and turnover intentions.

Practical implications

By providing persuasive evidence on tangible business benefits of CSR initiatives, this study addresses the concerns of corporate managers to prove the business potential and value engendered by their CSR efforts.

Originality/value

The study makes a novel contribution by not only examining the direct association between the CSR and turnover intentions, but also by going a step ahead to unfurl the underlying psychological mechanisms for better understanding of the relationships.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Margarita Mayo, Luis Gomez-Mejia, Shainaz Firfiray, Pascual Berrone and Veronica H Villena

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of top leaders beliefs in the importance of work-family balance as a key determinant in explaining the adoption of

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of top leaders beliefs in the importance of work-family balance as a key determinant in explaining the adoption of social practices oriented toward internal stakeholders, focussing on home telework as one of these practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 2,388 top executive officers reported the senior leaders belief favoring work-family balance by completing a new scale developed for this purpose asking how much key decision makers were convinced of the value to employees of supportive family-friendly HR practices, modeled how to balance work and family life, and felt a personal commitment to implement family-friendly practices. They also reported the firm’s provision of telework and organizational characteristics such as industry, multinational status, and firm size.

Findings

Regression analyses revealed that firm’s provision of telework is more pervasive when its top leaders believe in the importance of work-family balance, even after controlling for firm context (industry, geographical dispersion, and size). More importantly, the authors also find that managerial beliefs augment the positive effect of instrumental factors on the provision of home telework.

Practical implications

For practitioners, the most important message is that, while contextual and organizational features are important in the choice of corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices for employees, the conviction of senior leaders is absolutely essential.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the leadership and CSR literature by suggesting that top leaders play a catalyst role in contexts where telework is instrumentally valued. If we conceive CSR for employees as not driven solely by utilitarian logic, it requires a different paradigm that includes leadership motives.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2019

Patricia Everaert, Lies Bouten and Annelien Baele

Using upper echelons theory (UET), the purpose of this paper is to unravel the influence of a CEO’s ethical ideology on the presence of corporate social responsibility (CSR

Abstract

Purpose

Using upper echelons theory (UET), the purpose of this paper is to unravel the influence of a CEO’s ethical ideology on the presence of corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure on corporate websites. It also considers the CEO’s perception of the importance of CSR (i.e. the extent of the CEO’s detachment from the stockholder-oriented logic and attachment to the stakeholder-oriented logic).

Design/methodology/approach

First, a survey was sent to CEOs of large unlisted Belgian companies. Its intention was to assess CEOs’ ethical ideology along the idealism and relativism dimensions and their perceptions on the importance of CSR (PRESOR-detachment-from-stockholder view; PRESOR-attachment-to-stakeholder view), and to gather some demographics. Second, a content analysis of corporate websites was conducted so as to classify companies as being either CSR disclosing or non-disclosing. Third, the annual accounts of these corporations were investigated and follow-up phone calls were conducted to obtain data on managerial discretion (MD).

Findings

CEOs’ ethical ideology influences the degree to which they detach from the stockholder-oriented logic and attach to the stakeholder-oriented logic. Moreover, when MD is high, the degree of these CEOs’ attachment to the stakeholder-oriented logic is the factor that influences the presence of CSR disclosure on their corporate websites. Finally, CEO’s idealism indirectly influences the presence of CSR disclosure through the effect of idealism on the degree to which CEOs attach to the stakeholder-oriented logic.

Originality/value

This paper shows that, when MD is high, CEOs’ values and perceptions influence CSR disclosure decisions. This study thereby enhances our knowledge regarding the internal drivers of CSR disclosure practices and offers UET as a lens through which the importance of CEOs’ personal characteristics in the decision-making process might be further explored.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Afra Abdeen, Edwin Rajah and Sanjaya S Gaur

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships among corporate social responsibility (CSR) beliefs, support intentions and purchase behaviour of consumers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships among corporate social responsibility (CSR) beliefs, support intentions and purchase behaviour of consumers. Although there is a rich stream of research reporting the relationship between CSR beliefs and support intentions, there is scant reporting on the mediating role of support intentions between CSR beliefs and purchase behaviour of consumers, hence presenting an opportunity to contribute to the marketing knowledge-base.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a quantitative research design to test the relationships among CSR beliefs, support intentions and purchase behaviour. The associations among these three constructs are tested using Hayes Process tool which is a versatile computational tool for observed variable – mediation, moderation and conditional process modelling.

Findings

The results provide support for the relationships among CSR beliefs, consumer support intentions and purchase behaviour. Of the four measured CSR beliefs, philanthropic ethical and legal aspects of CSR beliefs demonstrated the association with support intentions. The results also showed that only ethical beliefs have direct relationship with purchase behaviour. Additionally, support intention provided full mediation for the relationship between philanthropic beliefs and purchase behaviour as well as for legal beliefs and purchase behaviour.

Originality/value

This study is carried out in a unique context of New Zealand which is a melting pot of cultures from around the globe. This study presents empirical support to show that ethical, philanthropic and legal beliefs influence support intention and purchase behaviour for the sample of consumers in the context of New Zealand. Hence, communicating ethical, philanthropic and legal-related CSR beliefs provides the means to create consumer perceptions of competitive advantage when adopting a CSR activities for marketing product and service offerings.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Preeda Srinaruewan, Wayne Binney and Colin Higgins

The purpose of this paper is to understand the business case for corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Thailand by focusing on the consumer-organisational relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the business case for corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Thailand by focusing on the consumer-organisational relationship and test the conceptual framework of Du et al. (2007).

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study was conducted using a mall intercept survey of 184 Thai mobile phone service provider consumers in Bangkok, Thailand.

Findings

A CSR emphasised brand is more likely than non-CSR emphasised brands to accrue consumer CSR awareness, positive attitude to company motivations and beliefs in the CSR of that company. Although beliefs are associated with consumers’ greater identification and advocacy behaviours towards the CSR emphasised brand than the non-CSR emphasised brands, they are not associated with loyalty.

Practical implications

The paper provides potential guidance for companies to more effectively position and communicate their CSR activities to create differential advantages.

Originality/value

Findings of the study demonstrate some support for a business case for CSR in Thailand.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Lina Tan, John Heath Roberts and Pamela Danvers Morrison

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of consumers’ expectations and their antecedents on beliefs, attitude and behavioral intentions when they respond to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of consumers’ expectations and their antecedents on beliefs, attitude and behavioral intentions when they respond to new corporate social responsibility (CSR) information about a service firm.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirically, the authors measure prior beliefs, and then calibrate how those beliefs change in response to a piece of news. The authors develop a conceptual model articulating the nature and antecedents of three types of expectations: would, could and should. The authors use structural equation modeling to test how these expectations influence the consumer evaluation process.

Findings

The results show that the effect of could expectations on the evaluation process is felt via their influence on would expectations; that is, would expectations fully mediate the relationship between could expectations and attitude toward news. Similarly, attitude toward news fully mediates the relationship between would and should expectations and updated beliefs about the firm.

Research limitations/implications

In the selected service industry, the findings show that expectations are mediated by the new information that consumers receive when they are updating their prior beliefs. The authors demonstrate the ability to understand the antecedents of expectations, which provides a vehicle by which the organization can influence the consumer evaluation process.

Practical implications

In practice, managers can identify the antecedents of consumer expectations and thus influence the reference points against which those consumers will evaluate news about their product.

Social implications

CSR has important implications for multiple stakeholders and the authors calibrate the determinants of how news about the organization’s performance on it may affect consumer decision processes.

Originality/value

The paper introduces “could” expectations into the services literature, examines the antecedents of the different types of expectations, and studies how their effect is felt through the evaluation process.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2020

Nimmy A. George, Nimitha Aboobaker and Manoj Edward

Drawing from the deontic justice theory and the social exchange theory, the purpose of this study attempts to identify the relationship between perceived corporate social…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from the deontic justice theory and the social exchange theory, the purpose of this study attempts to identify the relationship between perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) and employees' affective commitment, mediated through organizational trust. Furthermore, the authors seek to understand how the attitude of employees toward the importance of CSR, moderates the aforementioned relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The respondents for this descriptive study were drawn from a sample of 500 employees working in manufacturing companies in India. Self-reporting questionnaires were administered among the respondents, who were selected through the judgment sampling method. Measurement model analysis was done using IBM AMOS 21.0 and path analytic procedures using PROCESS 3.0 macro was used to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

Results revealed that there is a significant indirect effect of all three dimensions of CSR on affective commitment, through organizational trust. The conditional indirect effects varied significantly, and it was identified that both employee-CSR and customer-CSR had a significant indirect effect on employee affective commitment. However, social/nonsocial CSR did not have a conditional indirect effect on affective commitment, through attitude toward the importance of CSR and organizational trust.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional nature of the study does not allow inference of causality and pose limitations for generalization of results. Though the limitation of common method bias is inherent in studies with self-reporting measures, the authors adopted several procedural remedies to minimize its effect. The study results, particularly the role of attitude toward the importance of CSR need to be tested among employees in different industry sectors. Future studies should examine the same theoretical model in different nations, where CSR activities are not mandated by law.

Originality/value

This study is pioneering in conceptualizing and empirically testing a theoretical model that examined the combined influence of perceived CSR, employees' attitude toward the importance of CSR and organizational trust on their affective commitment toward the organization. This study extends the literature by examining the indirect/mechanisms linking CSR and employees' affective commitment. Exploring more on the employee individual differences and its influence on organizational outcomes will definitely improve individual and organizational functioning.

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Shubham Singh and Shashank Mittal

Differences in institutional environment and governance structures pave the way for heterogeneous nature of different businesses; this, in turn, shapes the way various…

Abstract

Purpose

Differences in institutional environment and governance structures pave the way for heterogeneous nature of different businesses; this, in turn, shapes the way various sections of society act toward each other enacting their responsibilities. Taking into account the unique institutional environment and governance structures of firms in developing economies, this paper aims to build on the “stakeholder theory” to address the issue of the implementation of corporate social responsibilities (CSR) practices in these economies, particularly India. This paper also aims to uncover the saliency (legitimacy and power) of different stakeholder groups on different aspects of a firm’s CSR activities. Further, as most of the firms in developing economies are family-run firms, the paper examines role of organizational leadership in shaping firms’ CSR strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Integrating literature on “stakeholder theory” and CSR, this paper examines the implementation of different CSR practices by family-run firms in India. This paper uses survey research to collect data from 80 privately held family firms operating in apparel and textiles industry in India. The data have been collected from respondents holding top leadership positions in the sample firms.

Findings

The findings indicate that pressure from primary stakeholders (i.e. customers, employees and shareholders) and CSR-oriented leadership belief significantly influence organizational implementation of CSR practices, whereas pressure from secondary stakeholder (i.e. community groups and non-governmental organizations) was found to be insignificant. Further, CSR-oriented leadership belief moderated the relationship between primary stakeholder pressure and organizational implementation of CSR practices. The findings equally highlighted lower saliency of secondary stakeholder’s legitimacy and power because of weak institutional mechanisms, while on the other hand, the primary stakeholders exert considerable power because of the direct nature of transactional legitimacy, further accentuated by the governance structure in family firms.

Originality/value

This paper is among the very few studies that address the issue of CSR among family-run businesses in developing economies. Existing frameworks on analyzing firm’s implementation of CSR practices does not recognize the inherent heterogeneity among different stakeholder groups. Recognizing that different stakeholders have different levels of influence over firms, this paper categorized the stakeholders’ groups into primary and secondary to analyze their differential impact over firms. Additionally, given the critical role of leadership belief in the implementation of CSR practices, this paper analyzed the moderated effect of CSR-oriented leadership belief toward developing a more robust model of CSR implementation.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Denni I. Arli and Fandy Tjiptono

In the past few years, companies have made significant contributions towards Corporate Social Responsibilities (CSR) as a strategy to improve business image. Nonetheless…

Abstract

Purpose

In the past few years, companies have made significant contributions towards Corporate Social Responsibilities (CSR) as a strategy to improve business image. Nonetheless, many of these strategies have been unsuccessful because companies have failed to recognise the importance of consumers’ ethical beliefs and their religiosity in forming their perception towards CSR. Thus, the purpose of this study is to explore the level of importance of consumers’ ethical beliefs and social responsibilities (CnSR) and to examine the impact of consumers’ religiosity and ethical beliefs on CnSR.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were derived from a sample of undergraduate and postgraduate students at three large universities (i.e. one public and two private universities) in Yogyakarta, Indonesia (N = 416). Indonesia is the largest Muslim population in the world.

Findings

7The study found that consumers value social responsibilities differently and that not all dimensions are important. Moreover, consumer ethical beliefs and religiosity significantly influence CnSR. The results of this study will contribute to the debate on consumer ethics and social responsibility research.

Research limitations/implications

The current study has some limitations which, in turn, provide avenues for future research. The research context (one city in one country) may limit its generalizability. Future studies may focus on more cities and/or cross-country sections (developed versus developing countries) as well as use non-student populations.

Practical implications

Companies operating in Indonesia need to respect and value religiosity in Indonesia. Collaborating with a faith-based institution may help improve the effectiveness of CSR programmes launched by companies.

Originality/value

This is one of the first few studies exploring CSR in Indonesia.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2019

Absdulsamad Alazzani, Wan Nordin Wan-Hussin and Michael Jones

Very limited research has been devoted to answering the question of whether the religious beliefs of the upper echelons of management and gender diversity have any impacts…

Abstract

Purpose

Very limited research has been devoted to answering the question of whether the religious beliefs of the upper echelons of management and gender diversity have any impacts on the communication of corporate social responsibility (CSR) information in the marketplace. This study aims to fill the void in the literature by posing the two research questions: first, does the CEO religion affect a firm’s CSR behaviour?; second, do the women on the boards influence CSR reporting?

Design/methodology/approach

The authors performed the tests on a sample of 133 firms listed in Bursa Malaysia that have analysts following using a self-constructed CSR disclosure index based on information in annual reports in 2009. A total of 23 per cent of the sample firms have Muslim CEOs, and women made up only 8 per cent of board members.

Findings

The authors find that Muslim CEOs are significantly associated with greater disclosure of CSR information. The authors also find a moderate relationship between board gender diversity and CSR disclosure. This is probably because of insufficient number of women on boards.

Research limitations/implications

The disclosure index is based on unsubstantiated CSR information provided in annual reports, and the authors examine only two aspects of board diversity, namely, Muslim religiosity and gender mix.

Originality/value

This study advances the research on upper echelons theory by illuminating the importance of religious value in influencing the CSR behaviour of corporate leaders. This has been largely overlooked because of lack of data.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

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