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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2022

Gonzalo Luna-Cortes and José Alejandro Aristizabal Cuellar

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of masculine eating/drinking beliefs on male consumers’ concern with unhealthy eating/drinking habits and, in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of masculine eating/drinking beliefs on male consumers’ concern with unhealthy eating/drinking habits and, in turn, with binge drinking. Additionally, this research tests if and how a change in these beliefs influences binge drinking intention and intention to eat unhealthy food.

Design/methodology/approach

Three studies were conducted in Bogotá (Colombian males; convenience sampling). The purpose of Study 1 (N = 209) was to develop a scale to measure masculine eating/drinking beliefs. Study 2 (N = 191) tested the mediating role of concern with unhealthy eating/drinking habits in the relationship of masculine eating/drinking beliefs with binge drinking. Study 3 (N = 179) was an experimental study, which examined the effect of information about some negative consequences of masculine beliefs on the answers to the masculine eating/drinking beliefs inventory and, in turn, on binge drinking intention and intention to eat unhealthy food.

Findings

A one-dimensional (eight-items) scale was developed and validated. The results of this paper show that masculine eating/drinking beliefs are associated with lower concern with unhealthy eating/drinking and, in turn, with higher binge drinking. Information that influences these beliefs leads to lower binge drinking and unhealthy food ingestion intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This research presents the first scale that measures masculine eating/drinking beliefs. It provides initial evidence on how an intervention focused on the negative consequences of sexism can influence these beliefs, affecting binge drinking and overeating intentions.

Practical implications

This research provides new findings on a topic associated with several health problems in many countries, including the effect on consumers’ weight gaining and related illnesses.

Originality/value

This research presents the first scale that measures masculine eating/drinking beliefs. It provides initial evidence about factors (through mediating variables) that link masculine eating/drinking beliefs with some unhealthy eating/drinking habits. In addition, the results show how information about some negative consequences of these beliefs can influence consumers’ binge drinking and unhealthy food ingestion intentions, which leads to key recommendations for future interventions. As a result, this research provides new findings on a topic associated with several health problems in many countries, including the effect on consumers’ weight gaining and related illnesses.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2022

Denni Arli

The purpose of this study is to show that the spread of conspiracy theories has resulted in many tragic incidents, such as January 6 Insurrection at the US Capitol…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to show that the spread of conspiracy theories has resulted in many tragic incidents, such as January 6 Insurrection at the US Capitol Building. Interestingly, many of the conspiracy theory followers are religious individuals. In response to this phenomenon, this study will investigate the impact of religious (un)beliefs on consumer ethics. Secondly, this study will investigate the mediating role of conspiracy theory on consumer ethics. Finally, this study will investigate the moderating role of ethical ideology (i.e. relativism) on the relationship between consumers’ (un)belief (e.g. religiosity and atheism) and consumer ethics.

Design/methodology/approach

Overall, 328 participants living in the USA (32% female and 68% male) were recruited from Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk) in exchange for financial compensation.

Findings

The results show the negative impact of a belief in a conspiracy theory. These conspiracy beliefs can skew any individual irrespective of their beliefs or unbelief. Religious leaders, policymakers and educators need to keep this in mind when designing a campaign to reduce unethical behavior. Everyone is prone to conspiracy theories.

Originality/value

This is one of the first few studies exploring the impact of belief in conspiracy theories on consumers’ ethical beliefs. There are still limited studies investigating whether conspiracy beliefs lead individuals to engage in unethical behavior.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 June 2022

Mauri Laukkanen

Studies of entrepreneurial intentions (EIs) have become increasingly common, informed usually by Ajzen’s (1991) theory of planned behaviour (TPB). Although the TPB…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies of entrepreneurial intentions (EIs) have become increasingly common, informed usually by Ajzen’s (1991) theory of planned behaviour (TPB). Although the TPB postulates that beliefs determine EIs, the contents of the beliefs have not been properly studied, leaving EIs’ cognitive underpinnings and cognitive approaches to influencing EIs unclear. To clarify the TPB/EI-belief nexus, the study examines the conceptual background of entrepreneurial cognitions and elicits the beliefs of a group of nascent micro entrepreneurs (NMEs) to compare them with their TPB attitudes and EIs, facilitating assessing their mutual consistency as implied by the TBP.

Design/methodology/approach

The respondents are entrepreneurial novice clients of a micro business advisory organisation. Their TPB attitudes and EIs were measured using standard TPB/EI methods. Comparative causal mapping (CCM) combined with semi-structured interviewing was used to reveal the NMEs’ typical belief systems, presented as aggregated cause maps.

Findings

The NMEs have uniform, relatively detailed belief systems about entrepreneurship and micro business. The belief systems are consistent with theory- and context-based expectations and logically aligned with the NMEs’ expressed TPB attitudes and EIs. CCM provides an accessible method for studying contents of entrepreneurial cognitions.

Research limitations/implications

It was not possible to study “entrepreneurship-negative” respondents or the intensity or origins of some specific beliefs.

Practical implications

Diagnosing and better understanding beliefs can benefit entrepreneurship education and development, in general or connected with TPB/EI studies.

Originality/value

The study reveals entrepreneurial belief systems systematically, evidently not done before generally or in terms of “everyday” micro entrepreneurship or TPB. It clarifies and supports the TPB notion that beliefs underpin actors’ attitudes and intentions.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 28 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2022

Jao-Hong Cheng and Li-Wei Lin

This paper aims to examine how situational factors with social support affecting purchase intention in social commerce (SC). In Taiwan’s SC, the relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how situational factors with social support affecting purchase intention in social commerce (SC). In Taiwan’s SC, the relationship between trust belief and purchase intention has always been a key issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents a research model that comprises five hypothesis with five constructs, including situational factors, social support, senses, trust belief and purchase intention. The model is tested on data collected from 532 valid samples in Taiwan, using structural equation modeling. The results show that, in order of importance, control senses and raise mediation trust belief reach the better purchase intention.

Findings

The findings of the study provide practical insights in understanding how seller should notice consumer’s trust belief, in order to enhance purchase intention for the SC as a whole.

Originality/value

Much existing consumer behavior research is focused on decision making rather than the trust belief themselves. Accordingly, analyzing how senses influence trust belief and purchase intention is an important issue in SC.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2022

Mengying Wu, Rongsong Wang, Haihua Wang and Christophe Estay

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of psychological contract breach on destructive by developing a moderated mediation model. The model focuses on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of psychological contract breach on destructive by developing a moderated mediation model. The model focuses on the mediating role of moral identity and moral disengagement and the moderating role of moral belief.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted a three-wave questionnaire survey and used 377 matched-sample data to test the hypotheses. PROCESS bootstrapping program in SPSS and confirmatory factor analysis in AMOS software were adopted in this study.

Findings

Results reveal that psychological contract breach has a positive effect on destructive leadership behavior, and the relationship is mediated by moral identity and moral disengagement; moral belief not only moderates the relationship between psychological contract breach and destructive leadership behavior, but also moderates the mediation effect of moral identity and moral disengagement.

Originality/value

First, this study enriches the destructive leadership behavior literature by verifying psychological contract breach as an antecedent. Second, this study discusses the role of morality in the formation mechanism of destructive leadership behavior by testing the mediating effect of moral identity and moral disengagement and the moderating effect of moral belief.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Richard Shepherd

Food choice is influenced by a range of factors, including sensoryattributes and beliefs about the nutritional value of the foods. It isdifficult to determine the relative…

Abstract

Food choice is influenced by a range of factors, including sensory attributes and beliefs about the nutritional value of the foods. It is difficult to determine the relative importance of beliefs about nutritional and sensory attributes to foods. It is necessary to examine these within an overall framework. The attitudes model developed by Fishbein and Ajzen is presented as a framework within which such comparisons can be made. It has been shown to be useful in a variety of studies of food choice. The relative importance of different types of beliefs can be assessed within this approach by examining the relationship between individual beliefs (or groups of beliefs) and either attitude or behaviour. In a number of studies sensory attributes have been found to be more important for table salt use, snack food consumption and consumption of foods contributing highly to fat in the diet. In the case of low‐fat milk consumption, however, nutritional beliefs were found to be more important than beliefs about the sensory attributes of the milks or their suitability for different uses.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 92 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Johannes Bauer, Dagmar Festner, Hans Gruber, Christian Harteis and Helmut Heid

Epistemological beliefs are fundamental assumptions about the nature of knowledge and learning. Research in university contexts has shown that they affect the ways and…

2679

Abstract

Epistemological beliefs are fundamental assumptions about the nature of knowledge and learning. Research in university contexts has shown that they affect the ways and results of student learning. This article transfers the concept of epistemological beliefs on workplace learning. The basic assumption is that employees' epistemological beliefs affect whether they perceive their workplace as learning environments. A study was conducted in which the interrelation of employees' epistemological beliefs with their appraisal of the workplace as supportive for learning was investigated. Additionally, the role of professional hierarchical levels concerning work‐related epistemological beliefs was analyzed. No significant interrelation between epistemological beliefs and workplace appraisal was found. Groups from different professional hierarchical levels did not differ in their workplace appraisal. Consequences about future research about the role of epistemological for workplace learning are discussed.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2009

Charles Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to look at the relation between beliefs and action in common sense judgment. The basic aim of the paper is to define and present a rational…

1218

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at the relation between beliefs and action in common sense judgment. The basic aim of the paper is to define and present a rational model of commonsense choice for the individual based on situation, belief, and personal resources. Second, the paper hypothesizes skills needed to make “good” commonsense choices.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a speculative essay. It draws from psychology, economics and game theory as a basis for its findings.

Findings

A schema useful for the modeling of commonsense judgment is developed. Factors that are the basis for belief formation or belief changes are analyzed within the context of the schema. Skills needed for good judgment are proposed.

Research implications

The model lays a basis for conceptual and empirical study on judgments made by individuals as defined by their situation, beliefs, and resources.

Practical implications

The model has promise for analyzing individual and group decisions in a variety of social and organizational settings.

Originality/value

This paper posits a construct of common sense useful as an operant in modeling and explaining individual judgments.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Andrew Razeghi

Leaders have long understood the importance a belief system has on the productivity of their team. The authors explain how can such an intangible motivational force be

1101

Abstract

Purpose

Leaders have long understood the importance a belief system has on the productivity of their team. The authors explain how can such an intangible motivational force be addressed and how leaders have the capability to influence a firm's success by inspiring positive beliefs.

Design/methodology/approach

Belief management involves recognizing those beliefs that both hinder and promote the advancement of a leader's vision. This includes the leader's beliefs as well as those of the team.

Findings

To begin managing beliefs, executives should take three initial steps: identify core belief, ask others what they believe, brand your beliefs.

Research limitations/implications

Dr Gregory Berns, a psychiatrist and neuroscientist at Emory University in Atlanta mapped the neurological effects of a belief exercise on his test subjects. Through the use of magnetic resonance imaging, Berns could see specific changes in cellular activity.

Practical implications

There's new evidence that a leader's beliefs are the foundations for each team's aspirations.

Originality/value

Leaders must not only tell people what they believe but let them know why they believe. If managed correctly, these beneficial beliefs will spread throughout a company to all its stakeholders.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2005

Anna Nöteberg and James E. Hunton

Face-to-face meetings between auditors and clients are becoming increasingly more difficult and expensive to arrange, due in large part to the ceaseless expansion of…

Abstract

Face-to-face meetings between auditors and clients are becoming increasingly more difficult and expensive to arrange, due in large part to the ceaseless expansion of commerce across the globe. Relying on electronic communication media such as e-mail messaging or video-conferencing for auditor–client inquiry purposes is one way to enhance the timeliness of such communications; however, questions arise with respect to potentially biasing influences of certain technical aspects of electronic media on auditors’ judgment and decision-making processes. Drawing on information processing theories, the current study posits that media and message attributes can interact, thereby differentially affecting auditors’ belief revisions – holding information content constant. The media attributes examined in the current study are cue multiplicity (i.e., the range of central and peripheral cues a medium is capable of transmitting) and message reprocessability (i.e., the extent of archival and retrieval features a medium is capable of handling); and the message attribute studied is evidence strength (e.g., the credibility of client-provided evidence). Research findings from a laboratory experiment with 189 graduate accounting students indicate the following: (1) when client-provided evidence is strong, neither message reprocessability nor cue multiplicity significantly affect the auditors’ belief revisions; (2) when evidence is weak and reprocessability is present, higher cue multiplicity leads to significantly greater belief revision in favor of the client; (3) when evidence is weak and reprocessability is absent, lower cue multiplicity results in significantly greater belief revision in favor of the client. Study results suggest theoretical and practical implications for globally distributed auditor–client communications.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-218-4

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