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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2019

Tarek Ben Hassen and Diane-Gabrielle Tremblay

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the factors that make Beirut a fashion hub by studying the characteristics of creativity and the role of the different stakeholders…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the factors that make Beirut a fashion hub by studying the characteristics of creativity and the role of the different stakeholders in setting an environment that encourages creativity in Beirut.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology of this research is based on a literature review and information collected through semi-structured interviews with the different stakeholders of the sector.

Findings

The research reveals three results. First, this dynamic fashion design in Beirut is explained by the international success of some Lebanese fashion designers. Second, as there is an absence of any form of governmental intervention, the development of the sector is totally based on private business initiatives. Third, the research demonstrates the importance of the local culture, knowledge exchanges and lifestyle in shaping creativity and designers’ careers in Beirut.

Originality/value

These findings contribute to the clarification and critical analysis of the current state of fashion design in Beirut, which would have several policy implications.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2020

Francesco Rouhana and Dima Jawad

This paper aims to present a novel approach for assessing the resilience of transportation road infrastructure against different failure scenarios based on the topological…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a novel approach for assessing the resilience of transportation road infrastructure against different failure scenarios based on the topological properties of the network. The approach is implemented in the context of developing countries where data scarcity is the norm, taking the capital city of Beirut as a case study.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is based on the graph theory concepts and uses spatial data and urban network analysis toolbox to estimate the resilience under random and rank-ordering failure scenarios. The quantitative approach is applied to statistically model the topological graph properties, centralities and appropriate resilience metrics.

Findings

The research approach is able to provide a unique insight into the network configuration in terms of resilience against failures. The road network of Beirut, with an average nodal degree of three, turns to act more similarly to a random graph when exposed to failures. Topological parameters, connectivity and density indices of the network decline through disruptions while revealing an entire dependence on the state of nodes. The Beirut random network responds similarly to random and targeted removals. Critical network components are highlighted following the approach.

Research limitations/implications

The approach is limited to an undirected and weighted specific graph of Beirut where the capacity to collect and process the necessary data in such context is limited.

Practical implications

Decision-makers are better able to direct and optimize resources by prioritizing the critical network components, therefore reducing the failure-induced downtime in the functionality.

Originality/value

The resilience of Beirut transportation network is quantified uniquely through graph theory under various node removal modes.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2018

Bilal El Itani, Fouad Ben Abdelaziz and Hatem Masri

Ambulance response time is an important factor in saving lives and is highly linked with the ambulance location problem. The Maximum Expected Covering Location Problem…

Abstract

Purpose

Ambulance response time is an important factor in saving lives and is highly linked with the ambulance location problem. The Maximum Expected Covering Location Problem (MEXCLP), introduced by Daskin (1983), is one of the most used ambulance location models that maximize the probability of stratifying demands for emergency medical service (EMS) centers. Due to huge increase in the operational costs of EMS centers, ambulance location models must consider the cost of coverage and the opportunity to use other companies’ private ambulances to answer emergency calls. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors propose to extend the MEXCLP to a bi-objective optimization problem where the cost of satisfying emergency calls is minimized.

Findings

The proposed model is tested using data retrieved from the Lebanese Red Cross (LRC) in Beirut capital of Lebanon. The reported findings show significant enhancements in the results where the LRC can fully satisfy the perceived demands from all areas in Beirut within 9 min with an affordable cost.

Originality/value

The model is a first attempt to reduce operational costs of EMS centers while constraining the response time to satisfy emergency calls at an acceptable rate.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

M. El‐Fadel, M. Zein, I. Nuwayhid, D. Jamali and S. Sadek

Urban tropospheric ozone (O3) concentrations can reach 40 folds its background level due to traffic‐induced emissions and extensive industrial activities. As such, O3 has…

Abstract

Urban tropospheric ozone (O3) concentrations can reach 40 folds its background level due to traffic‐induced emissions and extensive industrial activities. As such, O3 has become a pervasive air pollution problem in urban areas despite major efforts to control its precursors. In this paper, O3 formation mechanisms are briefly described, countrywide emissions with emphasis on O3 precursors are summarized, and field measurements of O3 background levels and its precursors in an urban area are presented. Simulation results using a photochemical air quality model including a sensitivity analysis with respect to design ratios and mixing heights are then presented. Mitigation alternatives and policies to control O3 formation are examined in the context of country‐specific characteristics.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2012

Julie Scott

The Mediterranean has long been celebrated for the richness, diversity, and historical depth of its cultural heritage. However, in recent years heritage and heritage…

Abstract

The Mediterranean has long been celebrated for the richness, diversity, and historical depth of its cultural heritage. However, in recent years heritage and heritage practice could be said to have become a new mode of production in the region (Bianchi, 2005). There are a number of reasons for this; one has to do with the stagnation of the Mediterranean's traditional “sun, sea, and sand” tourism. As a result of this tour operators and national governments have started to push the packaging of “culture” and “heritage” for a more diversified “up-market” product to attract higher-spending tourists to the region's cities and rural hinterland. Another factor is the restructuring and liberalization of the regional economy since the closing decades of the 20th century. There has seen a shift from agriculture to services as the dominant economic sector in this region and the concomitant discovery of culture has become an economic asset for investors seeking an outlet for global capital flows (Bianchi, 2005; Daher, 2007; Nogués-Pedregal, 2002). The European Union (EU) has had an important role to play in these processes, both in driving the region's neoliberal market reforms, and in promoting the establishment of its cultural heritage economy. Cultural heritage has become a priority area in EU Mediterranean policy, with millions of euros earmarked for heritage related projects. This takes the form both of loans to private investors from the European Development Bank, and of grants for public sector cultural heritage initiatives, for example, through its Euromed Heritage programs, the fourth phase of which is underway at the time of writing (Bianchi, 2005; Euromed Heritage, n.d.).

Details

Culture and Society in Tourism Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-683-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Christine Mady

Amidst the debates on the death or resurgence of public spaces emerges a significant question: how could public spaces that function at different urban scales and cater…

Abstract

Amidst the debates on the death or resurgence of public spaces emerges a significant question: how could public spaces that function at different urban scales and cater for diverse collective needs be provided? This article explores the roles and potentials of temporary public spaces in meeting diverse challenges related to the supply and use of urban open spaces. Positioning temporary public spaces within the literature on non-conventional public spaces is conducted with the purpose of identifying those spaces' characteristics. The proposed definition of temporary public spaces is based on their dynamic status of use-rights. Moreover, a conceptual framework based on urban land economics and bid rent theory is used to explain how such spaces transform under the exchange of temporary use-rights to activate vacant urban lots for public activities. This conceptual framework is applied in the case of a grass root approach to the supply of temporary public spaces. The context is Beirut, a city that has lost its public spaces due to wars and is trying to reintroduce them through different supply mechanisms. The examples illustrate how homogeneous urban spaces are identified over time and converted into heterogeneous and lively temporary public spaces. These contribute towards conviviality in a highly fragmented and multi-cultural society and animate everyday urban life.

Details

Open House International, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

M. El‐Fadel, R. Maroun, L. Semerjian and H. Harajli

Water‐related diseases are a human tragedy, resulting in millions of deaths each year, preventing millions more from leading healthy lives, and undermining development…

Abstract

Water‐related diseases are a human tragedy, resulting in millions of deaths each year, preventing millions more from leading healthy lives, and undermining development efforts by burdening the society with substantial socio‐economic costs. This problem is of great significance in developing countries, where polluted water, water shortages, and unsanitary living conditions prevail. This paper presents a case study on a health‐based socio‐economic assessment of drinking water quality in Lebanon, based on relevant valuation approaches and available country‐specific data. The assessment revealed that the potential health and economic benefits due to water and sanitation improvements can be significant (0.15‐3.35 percent of GDP).

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Shifting voting patterns in Lebanon.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB211511

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Laurent Yacoub, Samer Nakhle and Dorra Yahiaoui

Given the complexity of a post-conflict environment, the restaurant sector needs to be analyzed not just from the economic perspective. This paper aims to identify the…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the complexity of a post-conflict environment, the restaurant sector needs to be analyzed not just from the economic perspective. This paper aims to identify the diverse macroenvironmental and managerial factors underlying restaurant failures in Lebanon. The authors hope that this effort may help increasing restaurant success rates in other post-conflict settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The aim of this paper is to explain how macroenvironmental pressures influence the restaurant business and which managerial factors are most critical in a post-conflict context. The authors adopted a qualitative method by conducting face-to-face, semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The findings show that restaurant failures in a competitive and uncertain post-conflict environment were caused mainly by a snowball of internal organizational factors related to bad management, poor human resource management policies, inefficiency and fraud. Internal organizational factors can all be associated with human mistakes and bad decisions, including excessive initial investment, expensive decoration, inability to manage monthly expenses, bad communication and market research.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature regarding restaurant failures in post-conflict regions and presents results that are expected to help managers in family- and non-family-owned businesses to enhance their decision-making process.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Silvia Mazzetto and Roula El-Khoury

By looking at a selection of iconic modern projects designed by or commissioned to the prominent but not well-examined architect Sami Abdul Baki both in Lebanon and Kuwait…

Abstract

Purpose

By looking at a selection of iconic modern projects designed by or commissioned to the prominent but not well-examined architect Sami Abdul Baki both in Lebanon and Kuwait during his most productive years in the 50s, this paper attempts to identify first main trends, influences and ideologies that shaped these works at the peak of modern architectural development in the region. Through these examples, the paper then aims at retracing predominant trajectories of intellectual capital exchange and transfer of knowledge between Lebanon and Kuwait. These can go far beyond their territorial boundaries, without claiming a single grand-narrative that describes the modern architectural development in any of the two countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The data collected from discourse analysis, interviews and biographical notes were mapped into a schematic diagram illustrating a complex network of connections and multidisciplinary involvement in projects.

Findings

However, the outcome did not generate a dominant theme for the projects or expertise of the architect.

Originality/value

It is very likely that Sami Abdul Baki's strong political dimension and quality as a mediator or facilitator in addition to his strong network of contacts played a significant role in the project commissions that he has won as an architect/engineer in Kuwait, Lebanon, Germany and other countries.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

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