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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Miomir M. Jovanović, Ljiljana Kašćelan, Miljan Joksimović and Vladimir Kašćelan

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the interactive and individual influences of socio-demographic and behavioural-cognitive factors on the frequency and quality of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the interactive and individual influences of socio-demographic and behavioural-cognitive factors on the frequency and quality of wine consumption, as well as importance of the brand and advertising on selection.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey was prepared on the basis of the selected factors. The research was carried out on a sample of 207 randomly selected respondents. The analysis was done using the classification decision tree.

Findings

The results show the dominant influence of socio-demographic factors, such as region, place of living (urban-rural areas), family size, age, income and education of consumers as well as behavioural-cognitive factors, such as the price importance, place of purchase and product characteristics, in all analysed target variables. Apart from the similarities with traditional wine markets, the specificities related to an emerging market have also been determined.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this research concern sample size as well as the research conducted over the period of one year.

Practical implications

The practical objective of this paper is to help wine marketers to develop more effective positioning strategies for a specific emerging market.

Originality/value

This research combines critical factors based on related studies, including the antecedents and outcome variables, to develop more comprehensive models for better understanding of the wine consumers’ behaviour. In major and traditional wine-making countries, the consumption of wine is fairly predictable. In emerging markets, the commercial strategies are, for the most part, based on certain specificities and are quite interesting for the surveys.

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Shreesha M. and Sanjay Kumar Tyagi

In the digital era, the dynamics of the communication process in classrooms have changed significantly. With the help of computer-mediated communication techniques…

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1027

Abstract

Purpose

In the digital era, the dynamics of the communication process in classrooms have changed significantly. With the help of computer-mediated communication techniques, especially animation, teachers can deliver a distinct learning experience to students that can be fun, while presenting complex ideas in simpler forms. The purpose of this paper is to assess the effectiveness of animation in education, in the context of developing Asian countries, using Karnataka, an Indian state, as a study area.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses the field experimental method to assess animation’s effectiveness in education. Attempts are made to neutralize the influence of extraneous factors, such as psychological conditions, and the socio-economic background of students, while assessing academic performance. To achieve this, a fuzzy-set-theory-based two-sample statistical hypothesis test is used.

Findings

Results indicate that animation can be used as an effective tool for communication in pedagogy and, if used properly, can improve students’ academic performance in primary education, even in developing countries such as India.

Research limitations/implications

The paper’s limitations are explored, and point to how future research could use more advanced statistical tools to identify the motivational, behavioral, cognitive and psychological factors influencing students, when animation is used in education, and should perform a comparative analysis of the performance of students in developed and developing countries.

Originality/value

As the current study proves that animation is effective in education, even in developing countries such as India, efforts should be made to convert existing curricula into animated multimedia content. Currently, most government-run schools in India use traditional chalk-and-talk methods for teaching. The use of animated instructional material will help improve the standard of educational communication in classroom, and maintain consistency in delivering the curriculum.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

Ling Deng and Paul Gibson

This paper aims to present an empirically informed model of the underlying factors that enable effective cross‐cultural leadership. It also outlines procedures for using…

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7423

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an empirically informed model of the underlying factors that enable effective cross‐cultural leadership. It also outlines procedures for using the model to assist expatriate managers to develop the capacities that underlie effective cross‐cultural leadership. The model encompasses the complexity of cross‐cultural leadership issues in China, the importance of having some theoretical knowledge on the topic, and the need to be flexible and pragmatic in applying this knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework of the factors that interact to produce effective cross‐cultural leadership was developed from the literature. Semi‐structured in‐depth interviews were conducted with 32 Western expatriate managers and 19 local Chinese managers working in Australian businesses operating in Shanghai and Beijing. Within each interview, respondents were asked what they believe are the keys to successful leadership in Australian‐Chinese cross‐cultural workplaces.

Findings

The interviews revealed a core series of cross‐cultural leadership competencies that call upon all three of transformational leadership, emotional intelligence, and cultural intelligence.

Practical implications

The findings and perspectives presented here should assist organizations in their selection and development of expatriate leaders. The paper argues that organizations should focus less upon skills and more upon underlying attitudinal and cognitive enablers.

Originality/value

Whilst most cross‐cultural leadership studies to date have focused on examining and explaining cultural differences and their influence on leadership effectiveness, this paper focuses on individual orientation and capacities.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Randa Diab-Bahman, Abrar Al-Enzi, Wael Sharafeddine and Sapheya Aftimos

This paper aims to examine the correlation between academic performance and attendance of e-learning, away from the conventional classroom setting.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the correlation between academic performance and attendance of e-learning, away from the conventional classroom setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigates the impact of attendance in the final grades of 389 undergraduate first- and second-year undergraduates taking Business Management classes online for the first time over the span of three consecutive academic semesters during an academic year.

Findings

The results show that there was a negative correlation between attendance and grades. However, splitting the results by year provided some insightful information as there was a difference between the relationships for first- and second-year students. Therefore, it can be concluded that both attendance and the year of the students did have a statistically significant influence on grades.

Originality/value

Although the impact of students' attendance on their academic performance has not been the subject of extensive research, especially in the field of Management studies and in an online delivery medium, it is likely to be of interest to academics and policymakers as the pandemic continues to make e-learning more popular.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Victor Dulewicz and Malcolm Higgs

To investigate the new leadership dimensions questionnaire (LDQ) and a related framework for assessing an individual's leadership style in relation to the context in which…

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34625

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the new leadership dimensions questionnaire (LDQ) and a related framework for assessing an individual's leadership style in relation to the context in which the leader works; the three new LDQ sub‐scales designed to measure organisational context, follower commitment and leader performance; and the relationship between personality and leadership.Design/methodology/approach – Research is reported on LDQ data from a large sample of leaders and managers (n 222) from a range of public and private organisations. A style score was calculated and then related to data on respondents' biographical – job function, gender, sector and nationality – and FFM personality data.Findings – Results show a reasonably even allocation across all three leadership styles and that the styles are independent of the four important biographical variables. They also show that the five FFM personality factors do not account for any additional variance on any of the styles at a significant level. Results on the factor structure of the organisational context, follower commitment and leader performance scales show them to be reliable scales.Research limitations/implications – A majority of the sample were from the UK, from the private sector and were male. This study did not incorporate measures of job performance or investigate the style and context link. The self‐assessed, not the 360° version of LDQ was used.Practical implications – Some support is provided for the LDQ's use for leadership assessment and development, and for identifying potential, in both public and private sector organisations, with a standardisation sample of more than 1,000 now available. Results also show that the LDQ can be used without losing significant personality‐related variance.Originality/value – LDQ provides a unique opportunity for managers to relate leadership dimensions to three different leadership styles – engaging, goal‐oriented and involving – and, in turn, to the degree of organisational volatility faced by the leader, thus enabling respondents to identify the most appropriate style. Leader performance and follower commitment sub‐scales should facilitate further research by academics into leadership performance.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 December 2021

Manale Abdo, Khalil Feghali and Mona Akram Zgheib

This paper aims to assess the influence of emotional intelligence (EI) on the perceived internal control performance in the Lebanese companies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the influence of emotional intelligence (EI) on the perceived internal control performance in the Lebanese companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The goal of this study is to decide whether there is a connection between “emotional intelligence” and perceived efficacy of “internal control” in Lebanese organizations. For the benefit and purpose of this research, a quantitative methodology will be applied. The data was collected by the use of self-directed and pre-coded questionnaires to test hypotheses made, making it a deductive research.

Findings

The findings showed that the personality traits of the members of the audit team play a key role in cultivating a control climate that is more conducive to effective control. Moreover, personality traits were key in boosting trust and openness in communication that can be seen as antecedents to having a system where all key auditing professionals within the organization can cooperate to boost the effectiveness of the internal control framework. These personality traits amplified the impact of the EI of audit manager on the overall effectiveness of the COSO framework, thus leading to improved efficiency of internal controls.

Research limitations/implications

The exploratory aspect of this study have shown results that are general but create a basis for future comprehensive researches. This study was limited to a relatively small sample, due to the small size of Lebanon and due to the Pandemic that has limited our access to more data. This research did not regulate other relevant variables such as gender, experience, educational level and age. Nevertheless, the importance of the findings is they ascertain that internal control is not a rigid technical function that is primarily concerned with accounting and financial disciplines, rather it extends to organizational psychology and behavior.

Practical implications

The practical implication of studying EM and personality in Lebanese organizations is to describe and understand how it affects the effectiveness of the internal control and thus the survival of the organization. When organizations are aware of such a strong impact, they will try to increase their maturity level in this regard and further seeks more efforts in tackling the EI aspect. As a summary, the practical implication of this paper is to understand how all those variables affect the effectiveness of the internal control and thus the survival of the organization.

Social implications

The subject of this study consists of many human-related aspects such as personality and human behavior. Once these elements are combined with the internal control framework, it will have an added value at the social level by enhancing the behavior of people and their perception of others' emotions and oneself emotions, in addition to improving their performance which reflects on enhancing the overall organizational performance. Studying EI allows to understand and manage emotions in order to create positive social interactions. The benefits of EI are vast in terms of personal, academic and professional success.

Originality/value

Due to the lack of research on this topic, this research will contribute to explore the field. Future studies will benefit from this analysis while using a larger sample. Future work should aim to include not only auditors but all staff of the company. Further research is required to decide whether the results of this analysis are generalized across various positions and industries and to determine whether EI is the only influential aspect involving a significant number of social interactions. In addition, this article can be used as a basis for the implementation of internal control with a COSO framework that involves the EQ of everyone in the organization.

Details

Asian Journal of Accounting Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2443-4175

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2020

Carlos Flavián, Miguel Guinaliu and Yuntao Lu

With the popularity of mobile devices and new technologies, such as NFC, mobile payment, which is taking the place of credit cards and cash as the chief payment method, is…

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1925

Abstract

Purpose

With the popularity of mobile devices and new technologies, such as NFC, mobile payment, which is taking the place of credit cards and cash as the chief payment method, is attracting more and more attention. Thus, this paper aims to investigate the main determinants of mobile payment use intention and proposes a model of mobile payment adoption, integrating mindfulness as a major factor.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the study were collected through an online survey of a representative sample of 414 users in the United States and 380 in Spain. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to verify the validity of the variables and the relationships among them.

Findings

The results showed that mindfulness, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, subjective norms and attitude have significant influence on mobile payment use intention.

Research limitations/implications

The present study is based on samples from only the United States and Spain, which limits generalization of the results. The notion of mindfulness is new in mobile payment adoption research, so future studies should analyze in more detail and in depth its effect on these adoption processes.

Originality/value

This is the first study to incorporate mindfulness into a mobile payment adoption process. Incorporating mindfulness complements traditional variables to show how users address the adoption process (e.g. novelty seeking, engagement, anxiety, attention paid).

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2019

Raavee Kadam, Srinivasa Rao, Waheed Kareem Abdul and Shazi Shah Jabeen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the various antecedents that impact the development of cultural intelligence (CQ) among students. The study also explores how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the various antecedents that impact the development of cultural intelligence (CQ) among students. The study also explores how growing up as a third culture kid (TCK) or a monoculture kid (MCK) impacts the relationship between the antecedents and CQ.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from 307 students consisting of both TCKs and MCKs, the authors test the direct effects and moderation model amongst the antecedents and CQ. Convenience sampling was employed to choose the participants for the study. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and administered to the students via e-mail.

Findings

The results indicated that short-term trips abroad, undertaking a cross-cultural management course, local culture proficiency, watching films from other cultures, language of work proficiency, having friends from other cultures and interaction with people from different nationalities had a significant effect on CQ.

Practical implications

This study provides a list of variables that facilitate the development of intercultural competence amongst students, which can be used as a base by academic institutions to develop various courses, classroom activities and university programs. Also, classifying students as TCKs and MCKs helps us understand which CQ antecedents are more important for which category of students.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies on antecedents of CQ, which explores the impact of being a TCK or MCK on the development of students’ CQ.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Regina Ahn and Michelle R. Nelson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the behaviors and social interactions among preschool children and their teachers during food consumption at a daycare facility…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the behaviors and social interactions among preschool children and their teachers during food consumption at a daycare facility. Using social cognitive theory, the goal is to identify how role modeling, rules, behaviors and communication shape these young consumers’ health-related food consumption and habits.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted in a US daycare facility among preschool children (aged four years) over a three-month period. Qualitative ethnographic methods included participant and non-participant observation of meals and snack-time.

Findings

Findings from the observations revealed that teachers’ food socialization styles and social interactions with peers cultivate children’s food consumption. In addition, commensality rules set by the childcare institution also help children learn other valuable behaviors (e.g. table manners and cleaning up).

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in one location with one age group so the results may not be generalized to all children. As more young children spend time in preschools and daycare centers, the understanding of how these settings and the caregivers and peers influence them becomes more important. Preschool teachers can influence their young students’ food consumption through their actions and words. Training teachers and cultivating educational programs about ways to encourage healthy eating habits could be implemented.

Originality/value

The paper offers observations of actual behaviors among young children in a naturalistic setting.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Mohamad Fazli Sabri, Christine C. Cook and Clinton G. Gudmunson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between personal and family backgrounds, academic ability, childhood consumer experience, financial…

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4819

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between personal and family backgrounds, academic ability, childhood consumer experience, financial socialization, financial literacy, and perceived financial well‐being of college students.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a multi‐stage sampling technique from 11 public and private universities across Malaysia and the sample consists of 2,219 college students. Structural equation modelling was utilized to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Childhood consumer experiences such as savings habits contribute to students’ financial well‐being (money saved, current financial situation, and financial management skills). Financial socialization agents, for example, through parents and religion sources could increase college students’ financial well‐being. Financial literacy was related to financial well‐being. There were important differences between the Malay and Chinese ethnic groups in Malaysia.

Research limitations/implications

Overall, implications and recommendations for future research, teaching, and public policy are also provided for parents, college administrators, counselors and educators.

Originality/value

This research provides meaningful information about how various factors (childhood experience, financial socialization, and financial literacy) predict students’ financial well‐being.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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