Search results

1 – 10 of over 40000
Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

M.J. Taylor, M. Baskett, S. Duffy and C. Wren

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of the types of adjustments appropriate to university teaching practices for students with emotional and behavioural

1311

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of the types of adjustments appropriate to university teaching practices for students with emotional and behavioural difficulties in the UK higher education (HE) sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study in a UK university was undertaken over a two‐year period.

Findings

A variety of types of adjustments may be necessary for UK university students with emotional and behavioural difficulties including adjustments to pastoral care, teaching and assessment.

Research limitations/implications

The case study focussed on only three students with emotional and behavioural difficulties. However, given that the number of students entering UK universities with such difficulties is increasing, the results of this research can hopefully inform the teaching of future students.

Practical implications

This paper addresses what UK university teaching staff may need to do to support students with emotional and behavioural difficulties.

Originality/value

Although research has been conducted into the teaching of individuals with emotional and behavioural difficulties in schools, little if any research has been undertaken regarding teaching such students at university level.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2022

Ping Gui, Zufeng Yang and Jun Che

In the face of major disasters, the Chinese people's willingness to donate has increased and the result is that the donation paths have increased. However, there are…

46

Abstract

Purpose

In the face of major disasters, the Chinese people's willingness to donate has increased and the result is that the donation paths have increased. However, there are certain differences in the choice of donation paths for different types of individuals. It is crucial to pay more attention to the attitude and donation path selection of donors and propose strategies to promote individual donation behavior. The purpose of this study is to propose a conceptualized moderated mediation model for testing the linkage between individual attitude and donation path selection through the mediating effect of donors' behavioral intention and the moderating effect of behavioral difficulty perception or social pressure between donors' attitude and their donation path selection.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a questionnaire survey of 628 community workers during COVID-19 in China. Self-reported measures were used to obtain data on IA, BI, SP, BDP and DPS. Survey data were used to test the proposed model using hierarchical regression analysis. Mediation analyses with bootstrap via PROCESS were used to ascertain the proposed relationship.

Findings

The results showed that individual attitude are positively related to donation path selection. Moreover, this study finds that behavioral intention serves as a mediator in the relationships between individual attitude and donation path selection. The social pressure and behavioral difficulty perception negatively moderate the relationship between individual attitude and behavioral intention.

Research limitations/implications

There are still some shortcomings in this study: First, although the data collected at multiple points in this study are all individual data. Future research can add evaluations of relatives, friends or colleagues to individual scheduling of survey subjects to reduce homology errors. Second, although this study has verified the mediating role of the opposite sex, some of the mediating results show that there may be other variables that play a role in the relationship between individual attitudes and donation path selection. In the research on path selection, the integrated theoretical perspective has rich connotations but has not attracted enough attention from the academic community. This research is only based on this single theoretical perspective to construct, verify and explain the model, and there should be other integrated theories. The fit point can be used to analyze the influence mechanism of individual attitudes on the choice of donation path.

Practical implications

First of all, we must deepen our understanding of the connotation and role of individuals' attitudes. In the event of a major epidemic, the following two types of measures will be taken to improve individuals' attitudes toward specific donation paths: First, the sponsors of each donation should do their best to donors and provide more information about donations, because the more information resources they have, the stronger the experience of the corresponding donation path, and the more they will choose the path. The sponsor of the second donation must show concern for major epidemics that are prone to occur and a desire to help people affected by disasters, so as to enhance the emotional identity of the donor, thereby increasing the probability of the donor choosing a specific donation path. Secondly, donation sponsors should be wary of the negative influence of social pressure on the donation path selection of individual donors. Donation sponsors can train individuals who are willing to donate, guide them in social relations, online public opinion and other pressure methods and improve the possibility of individuals choosing specific donation routes.

Social implications

Deepen the understanding of the content and effectiveness of the behavioral difficulty perception that has a profound impact on the donor. The greater the tendency to make a path choice is often affected by the individual's perception of the difficulty of behavior. The perception of difficulty of a certain donation path will cause the individual to retreat and inhibit the possibility of the individual choosing the path. Therefore, donation sponsors should take all measures to make their own donation channels simpler and more efficient, thereby reducing the individual's perception of the difficulty of donation behavior.

Originality/value

Drawing on TPB theory, a theoretical framework is constructed that specifies the process through which individual attitude affects donation path selection to expand collective understandings of individual attitude in the donation context. Furthermore, the boundary conditions of the underlying process are investigated, which further enhances the contribution of this paper to the extant literature on individual attitude.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 December 2015

Celia Beckett, Richard Cross, Jaqui Hewitt-Taylor and Pam McConnell

– The purpose of this paper is to describe the development process of building an assessment model to assess the emotional and behavioural needs of “looked after children”.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development process of building an assessment model to assess the emotional and behavioural needs of “looked after children”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a technical paper developing and evaluating a process for comprehensively assessing children ' s needs using a combination of three existing tools.

Findings

The paper identifies a model to assess “looked after” children and highlights some of the early benefits and challenges which have been encountered using this model.

Practical implications

This paper suggests a model and timeframe to ensure that detailed assessments of the mental health of “looked after” children are effectively carried out.

Social implications

There is a potential for an improvement in assessment of looked after children that will lead to the identification of appropriate interventions and services.

Originality/value

The paper is new in identifying a combination of assessment measures and a timeline to complete these.

Abstract

Relatively limited attention has been paid to the academic needs of students with emotional and behavioral difficulties. Effective interventions are needed to support these students academically, behaviorally, and socially. The purpose of the concurrent studies reported here was to investigate the effectiveness of academic support in writing for fourth- and fifth-grade students (six boys, two girls) and second- and third-grade students (seven boys, one girl) with writing and behavioral difficulties. The Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD) approach was implemented as a tier-2 intervention within a comprehensive, integrated three-tiered model of prevention including academic-, behavioral-, and social-skills components. Students learned an on-demand writing strategy for their state writing-competency test. Dependent measures included number of story writing elements, total number of words written, and writing quality. Fourth- and fifth-grade students who completed the intervention improved in total number of story elements. There were mixed results for the total number of words written and writing quality. Second- and third-grade students did not improve their total number of story elements, total words written, or writing quality. Students in both studies scored the intervention favorably, while there were mixed reactions from teachers. Findings, limitations, and suggestions for future research are discussed. Implications for the construct of evidence-based practice (EBP) are also explored, including concerns regarding frequent assessment of writing throughout intervention regardless of stage of instruction in the SRSD model.

Details

Assessment and Intervention
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-829-9

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

James Law and Lawrie Elliott

This paper examines the overlap between two groups of children, those with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN) and those with social, emotional and behavioural

Abstract

This paper examines the overlap between two groups of children, those with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN) and those with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties (SEBD). The case is made that these are common and overlap, with serious consequences for the children and families concerned. The difficulties experienced by the children and their families have implications for health inequalities and should influence the way in which both child and adolescent mental health and public health services are conceptualised and delivered.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 March 2011

Asmita Patel, Rachel Calam and Angela Latham

The research sought to assess perceived barriers to enrolment in parenting programmes by different ethnic groups in a deprived inner‐city community. In study one, parents…

Abstract

The research sought to assess perceived barriers to enrolment in parenting programmes by different ethnic groups in a deprived inner‐city community. In study one, parents of children attending pre‐school services targeted with outreach strategies were assessed using a Barriers Checklist to identify factors influencing uptake. In study two, a larger sample completed the checklist and SDQ (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire) to test associations between intention and parent‐rated behavioural difficulties. Study one found no significant differences in individual perceived barriers or levels of behavioural difficulty between ethnic groups. In study two, Pakistani, Asian British and African families showed the highest levels of interest in attending groups, and White British and Black British the lowest. There was no significant correlation between interest and behavioural difficulties. Higher parent education was associated with interest. The research shows that barriers to attendance are diverse, and finding further ways of enhancing the uptake of community‐based group programmes across different ethnic groups would be valuable.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2012

Irene Feigin

Existing research indicates that internationally adopted children exhibit elevated rate of emotional and behavioral difficulties. They are explained by the effects of…

Abstract

Existing research indicates that internationally adopted children exhibit elevated rate of emotional and behavioral difficulties. They are explained by the effects of early trauma, disturbed attachment, institutionalized behavior, and delays in cognitive development. Early interventions, therefore, focus on medical screening and cognitive testing, while adjustment aspect of early period for the entire family is neglected. The role of adoptive family is viewed as that of rehabilitation, its role as an active agent of change is ignored or underestimated.

The approach grounded in family system theory and focused on the family process is effective for resolution of child's difficulties. This chapter demonstrates that early intervention centered on mutual adjustment of the family and the child prevents escalation of child's emotional tension, defiant behavior, and formation of rigid patterns of family interactions and psychopathology in children. It leads to behavioral improvements, and builds a foundation for lasting relationship. Therapy for American families and their school-age adopted children from Russia was simultaneously conducted in two languages by a bilingual psychologist, a native Russian speaker. Principles of such intervention are formulated: (1) The form of intervention is a dialogue between all family members. It facilitates safe self-expression and eases overwhelming emotions. (2) Child's behavior is understood within a framework of adjustment to a transition, associated with experience of novelty and loss. To prevent complications of unresolved grief, the child's loss is identified and acknowledged. (3) Changes that effect existing family system (such as adoptive siblings) and cause tensions are addressed. (4) Certain problematic behaviors and their former adaptive function are reframed and thus normalized within a context of child's culture. (5) In the process, history of child's life unfolds, integrating the past and the present, facilitating continuity of memory, and preventing disruption of identity.

Details

Transforming Troubled Lives: Strategies and Interventions for Children with Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-711-6

Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2014

Garry Hornby

This chapter considers the development and current state of special education in New Zealand. The chapter provides a critique of current policies and practices regarding…

Abstract

This chapter considers the development and current state of special education in New Zealand. The chapter provides a critique of current policies and practices regarding special and inclusive education for children with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). It describes how New Zealand has followed similar patterns to other developed countries with regard to how special education facilities and specialist teacher training have evolved, and how the trend towards inclusive education has progressed. It points out that New Zealand has gone further in the inclusion of children with SEND within mainstream schools than most developed countries and that, at the same time, there has been less development of provision for children with SEND in mainstream schools. That has led to a situation where many children with SEND, who are in the lowest 20% of achievers, are not getting the specialist help that they need. As a result New Zealand has one of the largest gaps between high achieving and low achieving children in the developed world.

Details

Special Education International Perspectives: Practices Across the Globe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-096-4

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Despina Rothi and Gerard Leavey

Mounting evidence of a crisis in mental health care for young people has underlined the need for early and better recognition of mental health difficulties in children…

Abstract

Mounting evidence of a crisis in mental health care for young people has underlined the need for early and better recognition of mental health difficulties in children. Recent policy suggests that schools and teachers must play a pivotal role in smoother pathways to care. This will necessitate enhanced working relationships between schools and child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS). However, there is little understanding as to how teachers and mental health professionals currently relate to one another or what difficulties undermine ‘joined up’ care. In this study we examine current systems of collaboration between schools and child and adolescent mental health services, paying particular attention to relationships between schoolteachers and mental health professionals. Data was collected using semi‐structured, in‐depth interviews. Our findings indicate deep‐seated barriers to good collaboration. Moreover, teachers experience significant frustration through feeling excluded from the mental health care management of children despite being affected professionally by such decisions taken, the delays to intervention and poor communication between agencies. Interprofessional trust and mutual suspicion emerged from these interviews as an over‐arching factor. The implications arising from expectations for greater inter‐agency collaboration are discussed.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Carin Eisenstein, Victoria Zamperoni, Neil Humphrey, Jessica Deighton, Miranda Wolpert, Camilla Rosan, Helen Bohan, Antonis A. Kousoulis, Marianne Promberger and Julian Edbrooke-Childs

The purpose of this paper is to determine the efficacy of the Peer Education Project (PEP), a school-based, peer-led intervention designed to support secondary school…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the efficacy of the Peer Education Project (PEP), a school-based, peer-led intervention designed to support secondary school students to develop the skills and knowledge they need to safeguard their mental health and that of their peers.

Design/methodology/approach

Six schools from across England and the Channel Islands took part in an evaluation of the PEP across the 2016/2017 academic year. In total, 45 trained peer educators from the sixth form and 455 Year 7 students completed pre- and post-questionnaires assessing their emotional and behavioural difficulties, perceived school climate, and knowledge, skills and confidence related to mental health.

Findings

Results indicate that participation in the PEP is associated with significant improvement in key skills among both peer educators and student trainees, and in understanding of key terms and readiness to support others among trainees. Most students would recommend participation in the programme to other students.

Originality/value

While peer education has been found to be effective in some areas of health promotion, research on the effectiveness of peer-led mental health education programmes in schools is limited. This study contributes evidence around the efficacy of a new peer education programme that can be implemented in secondary schools.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 40000