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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Anil Gupta and Neelika Arora

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relative influence of “reasons for” and “reasons against” adoption of mobile banking (m-banking) among Indian consumers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relative influence of “reasons for” and “reasons against” adoption of mobile banking (m-banking) among Indian consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the framework of behavioral reasoning theory (BRT), hypothesized relationships between values, reasoning constructs, attitude and intentions were developed. The hypotheses were tested using a representative sample of data obtained from Indian banking consumers (n=379). Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were used to analyze the data.

Findings

The findings indicate that both “reasons for” and “reasons against” have an influence on m-banking adoption. Among the “reasons for” m-banking adoption, ubiquitous is the major determinant, and among the “reasons against” m-banking adoption, tradition barrier is the major determinant. The findings also confirm that value of “openness to change” significantly influences reasons for adoption and has no impact on reasons against and attitude toward m-banking.

Research limitations/implications

This study examines customers in only one context (i.e. India). Future research can examine samples in other countries so that the results can be generalized. Also the mediating role of demographic factors can be studied in future studies to predict m-banking adoption.

Practical implications

The findings of this study emphasize the importance of examining both the pro-adoption and anti-adoption factors while developing marketing strategy. This study confirms that m-banking adoption can be increased if managers attempt to minimize the effect of barriers of m-banking adoption.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine m-banking adoption using BRT, which investigates the reasons for and reasons against m-banking adoption in a single framework.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2018

Brijesh Sivathanu

The purpose of this paper is to utilize the novel approach of applying the behavioral reasoning theory (BRT) to examine the adoption of internet of things (IoT) based…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to utilize the novel approach of applying the behavioral reasoning theory (BRT) to examine the adoption of internet of things (IoT) based wearables for the healthcare of older adults and it aims to understand the relative effect of “reasons for” and “reasons against” adoption of IoT-based wearables for health care among older adults.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypothesized relationships were established using the BRT and empirically tested using a representative sample of 815 respondents. The data were analyzed using the PLS-SEM method.

Findings

The findings of this study demonstrate that adoption intention of IoT-based wearables for the health care of older adults is influenced by “reason for” and “reason against” adoption. The finding shows that “reasons for” adoption are ubiquitous, relative advantage, compatibility and convenience and “reasons against” adoption are usage barrier, traditional barrier and risk barrier. Value of “openness to change” significantly influences the “reasons for” and “reasons against” adoption of IoT-based wearables.

Research limitations/implications

This cross-sectional study is conducted only in the Indian context and future research can be conducted in other countries to generalize the results.

Practical implications

This research highlighted both the adoption factors—“for” and “against,” which should be considered while developing marketing strategies for IoT-based wearables for health care of older adults. Adoption of IoT-based wearables for healthcare of older adults will increase when marketers endeavor to minimize the effects of the anti-adoption factors.

Originality/value

This is a unique study that examines the adoption of IoT-based wearables for healthcare among older people using the BRT, by probing the “reasons for” and “reasons against” adoption in a single framework.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Rajasshrie Pillai and Brijesh Sivathanu

This study aims to use the novel approach of applying the behavioural reasoning theory (BRT) to understand the relative influence of reason for and reason against the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to use the novel approach of applying the behavioural reasoning theory (BRT) to understand the relative influence of reason for and reason against the adoption of mobile learning applications (M-learning apps) among information technology (IT) and information technology enabled services (ITeS) employees.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveys 680 employees of IT and ITeS companies in India to examine the adoption of M-learning apps for learning using the BRT and the primary data analysis was done using the partial least squares-structural equation modelling technique.

Findings

It is found that the context-specific adoption factors for M-learning apps are hedonic motivation, self-efficacy, learning autonomy, ubiquitous and relative advantage, whereas the reasons against adoption of the M-learning apps are traditional barrier, usage barrier and image barrier. It is also found that values of openness to change positively affect the reasons for adoption and do not significantly affect reasons against adoption of M-learning. Values of openness to change affect the attitude towards M-learning apps and attitude affects the adoption intention of M-learning apps for learning.

Research/limitations/implications

This cross-sectional study was conducted only in the Indian IT/ITeS firms and future research can be conducted in other sectors and countries to generalize the results.

Practical implications

This research uniquely highlights the adoption factors both for and against, which should be considered while developing marketing strategies for M-learning apps’ adoption. It is imperative for training managers to consider these factors during the selection of M-learning apps and for designers while designing the M-learning apps.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights towards the use of mobile apps for learning with the employees’ perspective using the BRT theory and it highlights the reason for adoption and reason against adoption of M-learning apps.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2020

Rajasshrie Pillai and Brijesh Sivathanu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the adoption of Internet of Things (IoT) in the agriculture industry by the farmers' in India using the theoretical lens of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the adoption of Internet of Things (IoT) in the agriculture industry by the farmers' in India using the theoretical lens of the behavioral reasoning theory (BRT).

Design/methodology/approach

A survey on farmers was conducted to examine the adoption of IoT in agriculture industry (IoT-A) using BRT. The data analysis of the primary survey was done by applying the structural equation modelling (SEM) technique.

Findings

The ‘reasons for’ adoption of IoT-A were as follows: Relative advantage, social influence, perceived convenience, and perceived usefulness. The ‘reasons against’ adoption were as follows: Image barrier, technological anxiety, perceived price and perceived risk. The BRT theory provides the platform to discuss the psychological processing of acceptance of IoT in agriculture industry by the farmers.

Practical implications

This research has unique implications as it studies the rural consumers’ behavior of innovation adoption namely IoT in agriculture. It provides the specific reasons ‘for’ and ‘against’ IoT adoption in agriculture, which will give directions to the marketers of IoT technology to develop suitable marketing strategies to improve the adoption in rural areas.

Originality/value

This research takes the first step in the direction toward deliberation of the adoption of IoT-A by farmers in an emerging Indian economy using the BRT theory, which discusses the ‘reasons for’ and ‘reasons against’ adoption in a proposed model.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Marcello Russo, Filomena Buonocore and Maria Ferrara

The purpose of this paper is to explore antecedents, namely reasons for/against error reporting, attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control, of nurses’ intentions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore antecedents, namely reasons for/against error reporting, attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control, of nurses’ intentions to report their errors at work.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured equation model with cross-sectional data were estimated to test the hypotheses on a sample of 188 Italian nurses.

Findings

Reasons for/against error reporting were associated with attitudes, subjective norms and perceived control. Further, reasons against were related to nurses’ intentions to report errors whereas reasons for error reporting were not. Lastly, perceived control was found to partially mediate the effects of reasons against error reporting on nurses’ intentions to act.

Research limitations/implications

Self-report data were collected at one point in time.

Practical implications

This study offers recommendations to healthcare managers on what factors may encourage nurses to report their errors.

Social implications

Lack of error reporting prevents timely interventions. The study contributes to documenting motivations that can persuade or dissuade nurses in this important decision.

Originality/value

This study extends prior research on error reporting that lacks a strong theoretical foundation by drawing on behavioral reasoning theory.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Priya Shah, Amandeep Dhir, Rohit Joshi and Naliniprava Tripathy

Major cereal staples such as wheat, white rice and corn have a significant negative impact on the environment, a low nutritional profile and are associated with obesity…

Abstract

Purpose

Major cereal staples such as wheat, white rice and corn have a significant negative impact on the environment, a low nutritional profile and are associated with obesity. In comparison, alternative staples (such as rye, quinoa, buckwheat, etc.) are more environmentally sustainable and nutritious, yet are underused. There has been a recent surge in research into and awareness of alternative staples, but the current understanding of the different drivers of and barriers to their consumption remains fragmented.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study attempts to assimilate and incorporate the current knowledge on the drivers of and barriers to the consumption of alternative staples. Eighty-one empirical studies were curated and analysed according to stringent protocols in order to examine the existing research profile and themes arising from prior research in this domain.

Findings

The study presents a profile of the extensive existing literature examining the drivers of and barriers to the consumption of alternative staples. The thematic analysis of selected studies resulted in the identification of six drivers and seven barriers. The drivers are an awareness of health; awareness of environmental factors; recommendations; awareness of the brand, labels and source of origin; household structure and demographic attributes. The barriers are difficulty in preparation, lack of familiarity, lack of availability, lack of affordability, culture, product attributes and sensory attributes. The various research gaps and avenues for future research associated with the drivers and barriers identified are also presented.

Originality/value

The key outcomes of the study are the presentation of the research profile, the identification of various drivers and barriers, the recognition of gaps in the research and avenues for future research and, finally, the development of a theoretical framework entitled “Behavioral reasoning towards the consumption of alternative staples (BRCAS)”. The study offers various insights for nutritionists, marketers, policymakers and consumers by increasing awareness of alternative staples.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Maria Vakola

At the heart of organizational change lies the extent to which individuals cope with the uncertainties and complexities that change introduces into their work lives. The…

Abstract

Purpose

At the heart of organizational change lies the extent to which individuals cope with the uncertainties and complexities that change introduces into their work lives. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the behavioral reactions of employees to change and their associated reasons for or against a large-scale technological change implemented in a bank.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 146 bank employees located in 40 bank branches participated two times in providing critical incidents regarding their initial and midcourse reactions to this change.

Findings

Results showed that anticipated benefits associated with change initiate positive reactions to change. These reactions are maintained positive due to supervisory support. Resistance is activated by perceived high cost-low benefit change at hand and it is shifted to active support when there is open communication and supervisory support.

Originality/value

Until now the majority of research studies on reactions to change do not investigate the duration and/or continuity of a behavior, assuming that once the reasons behind and the behaviors are formulated these will persist over time.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Andreas Chatzidakis, Sally Hibbert and Heidi Winklhofer

The purpose of this paper is to add clarity to current conceptualisations of attitudes towards giving versus not giving and to identify an approach that better informs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to add clarity to current conceptualisations of attitudes towards giving versus not giving and to identify an approach that better informs interventions that seek to promote particular types of pro-social consumer behaviour. Despite a considerable body of research that provides insights into why people give to charity, there is comparatively little understanding of the reasons why others decide not to give. More generally, existing applications of attitudinal models do not differentiate between decisions to perform and not to perform a behaviour. This paper challenges the assumption that attitudes towards performing and not performing a behaviour are logical opposites. Drawing on reasons theory, the paper examines the incremental and discriminant validity of attitudes for charitable giving versus attitudes against charitable giving, and the extent to which they correspond to different rather than opposite underlying reasons.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method approach with two different study stages was adopted. Stage 1 comprised an elicitation study that sought to identify reasons corresponding to a comprehensive range of motives for and barriers to charitable giving. This assisted in the development of a survey instrument that was used in Stage 2 to test the study’s hypotheses. The study used the Index of Multiple Deprivation with a view to provide a sample representative of the UK population (N = 243). Results were analysed through exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and step-wise regressions.

Findings

Results showed that reasons against charitable giving included logical opposites of reasons for charitable giving (complementarity assumption)as well as separate motivational factors. Attitudes for and against were in turn explained by distinct sets of reasons. The paper contributes by adding clarity to current conceptualisations of cognitions in relation to doing versus not doing. Identifying underlying reasons, rather than just attitudes, affords specific insight for marketing communications and public policy interventions.

Originality/value

The paper introduces to the marketing and consumer behaviour literature the previously neglected non-complementarity assumption and provides a more complete test of this assumption in the context of charitable giving.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 13 October 2017

Jasmina Mangafić, Amila Pilav-Velić, Danijela Martinović and Merima Činjarević

The purpose of this chapter is to explore the mediating effect of consumer attitude towards purchasing organic food and moderating effect of consumer innovativeness on the…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to explore the mediating effect of consumer attitude towards purchasing organic food and moderating effect of consumer innovativeness on the intention to purchase organic food. A consumer survey was conducted with a specific focus on buyers of organic food products in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Data were collected during December 2016 via an online survey, eventually obtaining 173 valid questionnaires for analysis. The indirect effect of organic food knowledge, subjective norm, personal norm, organic food availability, attitude towards organic food and organic food scepticism on intention to purchase organic food was tested using the PROCESS Macro in SPSS. The results revealed that organic food knowledge, subjective norm, personal norm, attitude towards organic food have indirect effects on consumer intention to purchase organic food. Moreover, findings suggest that attitude towards organic food purchase mediates the link between these four factors and consumer’s intention to purchase organic food. In addition, it was proven that consumer innovativeness positively moderates the attitude-purchase intention link in the context of organic food consumption. This chapter enhances the external validity of previous empirical findings beyond the Western European context. Further, it provides some important guidelines to the retailers to develop and implement marketing strategies for organic food products.

Details

Green Economy in the Western Balkans
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-499-6

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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2018

Joy Parkinson, Rebekah Russell-Bennett and Josephine Previte

There is a dominance of cognitive models used by marketers when studying social phenomena, which denies the complexity of the behavior under investigation. Complex social…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a dominance of cognitive models used by marketers when studying social phenomena, which denies the complexity of the behavior under investigation. Complex social behaviors are typically emotionally charged and require a different perspective. The purpose of this research is to challenge the planned behavior approach and reframe marketers’ perspectives on how to study complex social phenomenon such as breastfeeding.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey of 1,275 American and Australian women was undertaken to test the Model of Goal Behavior in a breastfeeding context. Structural equation modeling and multi-group analysis of novice (first-time mothers) and experienced mothers is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings demonstrate emotion and experience matter when understanding a complex social behavior such as breastfeeding. The emotional variables in the model had significant relationships, while the cognitive variables of instrumental and affective attitude did not. As women progress through their customer journey (from novice to experienced), the behavioral drivers change.

Practical implications

This research demonstrates an emotion, and experience-focused approach should guide the design of social marketing interventions aimed at changing complex social behaviors.

Originality/value

This research presents empirical evidence to challenge the pervasive use of planned behavior models and theories in marketing. Importantly, in social behavior models, emotion rather than attitudes have a larger role in determining intentions and behaviors.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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