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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Kerry Jacobs and Steve Evans

This paper aims to explore how accounting is entwined in the cultural practice of popular music. Particular attention is paid to how the accountant is constricted by…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how accounting is entwined in the cultural practice of popular music. Particular attention is paid to how the accountant is constricted by artists in art and the role(s) the accountant plays in the artistic narrative. In effect this explores the notion that there is a tension between the notion of the bourgeois world of “the accountant” and the world of “art for art's sake”.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on the cultural theory of Pierre Bourdieu to understand how the character of the accountant is constructed and used by the artist. Particular attention is paid in this respect to the biography and lyrics of the Beatles.

Findings

Accounting and accountants play both the hero and the villain. By rejecting the “accountant villain”, the artist identifies with and reinforces artistic purity and credibility. However, in order to achieve the economic benefits and maintain the balance between the “art” and the “money”, the economic prudence of the bourgeois accountant is required (although it might be resented).

Research limitations/implications

The analysis focuses on a relatively small range of musicians and is dominated by the biography of the Beatles. A further range of musicians and artists would extend this work. Further research could also be constructed to more fully consider the consumption, rather than just the production, of art and cultural products and performances.

Originality/value

This paper is a novel consideration of how accounting stereotypes are constructed and used in the field of artistic creation

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Michael A. Katovich and Wesley Longhofer

This chapter compares and contrasts the British invasion and punk rock as mystified, post-performance products. Expanding on Goffman's notion of mystification to discuss…

Abstract

This chapter compares and contrasts the British invasion and punk rock as mystified, post-performance products. Expanding on Goffman's notion of mystification to discuss texts that emerged from performances and drawing on Mannheim's distinction between ideological and utopian perspectives, we discuss the British invasion as bound to elite interpretations of mystified products and punk rock as bound to more provincial and anti-elitist interpretations. We note that despite differences, both genres involve, to varying degrees, mystifying differences, mystifying legendary status, and mystifying popularity itself. The discussion of both musical genres compliments and affirms previous analyses, especially the analysis of punk rock as a dramaturgical and utopian version of play.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-785-7

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

David Leaver and Ruth A. Schmidt

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the nature of music‐based tourism in the context of the childhood locations of music icons from the 1950s and 1960s. The Beatles

1137

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the nature of music‐based tourism in the context of the childhood locations of music icons from the 1950s and 1960s. The Beatles, Bob Dylan, Buddy Holly and Elvis Presley are selected and fieldwork is carried out in Hibbing, Liverpool, Lubbock, Memphis and Tupelo.

Design/methodology/approach

A normative approach is chosen using existing work on music‐based tourism as a backdrop. Key informant interviews are the main sources of primary data with a snowball technique used to gain access. Content and theme analysis is used.

Findings

Music‐based tourism is emotion driven with ideas of pilgrimage, nostalgia and heritage centring on sites of production of music; birth and death of individual artists; and places which shaped their early history. The demographic base of this market segment is widening to include both “baby‐boomers” and younger visitors for whom these music icons have become part of pop culture. It is important to recognise the sensitivities of these visitors and authenticity is a key factor.

Originality/value

This study is of interest to managers involved in promoting tourism and the marketing of place. It provides detail from major cities such as Liverpool to small towns such as Hibbing, Minnesota with a population of 18,000.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

David S. Bell

78

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

Beth Macleod and David Ginsburg

Although none of the new music reference books of the past year totally replaces the old stand‐bys, some significant works did appear, especially in the areas of…

Abstract

Although none of the new music reference books of the past year totally replaces the old stand‐bys, some significant works did appear, especially in the areas of contemporary music, opera, and classical music discography.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Keith M.C. O'Sullivan

88

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1981

David D. Ginsburg

It's been three years since my previous survey in RSR. Superb reference books in pop music have been appearing so frequently that I've been having trouble keeping up…

137

Abstract

It's been three years since my previous survey in RSR. Superb reference books in pop music have been appearing so frequently that I've been having trouble keeping up. Let's hope “next year's” survey will only be 12 months in the making and not 36.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 29 May 2019

Cesare Amatulli, Matteo De Angelis, Sue Vaux Halliday, Jonathan Morris and Floriana Mulazzi

The purpose of this paper is to enrich country of origin (COO) effect in international marketing theory by adding the understanding of temporal dynamism into COO research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to enrich country of origin (COO) effect in international marketing theory by adding the understanding of temporal dynamism into COO research.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilizing a qualitative and interdisciplinary phenomenological approach, this paper analyses historical and contemporary sources triangulated with contemporary primary interview data. The example of how perceptions of Italians about the values typical of the British Sixties varied over time periods is presented.

Findings

COO perceptions are both malleable and in evolution. Results show that values from earlier peak periods of appeal can be combined and recombined differently over time due to the varying historical and contemporary resonances of COO values.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on COO applied to two product areas, fashion and music, over a limited time period, in a two-country study and so the findings are not fully generalizable, but rather are transferable to similar contexts.

Practical implications

The fact that COO is neither static nor atemporal facilitates a segmented approach for international marketing managers to review and renew international brands. This enriched COO theory provides a rich and variable resource for developing and revitalizing brands.

Originality/value

The major contribution of this paper is that temporal dynamism, never before discussed in international marketing theory, renders COO theory more timeless; this addresses some critiques recently made about its relevance and practicality. The second contribution is the original research design that models interdisciplinary scholarship, enabling a thorough historical look at international marketing.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1976

George Copeman

Only 3–8 per cent of those eligible to vote in Britain have a direct shareholding in British industry. Britain's capital owners are so few that they are continually at

161

Abstract

Only 3–8 per cent of those eligible to vote in Britain have a direct shareholding in British industry. Britain's capital owners are so few that they are continually at risk of “source punishment”. The Law of Social Punishment says: “Small‐minority groups are at risk of social punishment regardless of whether they appear to be privileged or under‐privileged”. History contains many examples of both privileged and under‐privileged minorities being victimised. The vendetta against capital in Britain is harmful to the whole economy and it promotes the continuation of an out‐of‐date ideological battle between the supporters of Adam Smith and those of Karl Marx. Yet neither Smith's description of how capital is accumulated nor Marx's description is an acceptable explanation of how capital is accumulated today inside the successful joint stock company. An up‐to‐date description of how capital is accumulated leads logically on to a policy of employee participation in capital growth. Britain needs such a policy, as effected in the United States and France, to create shareholders out of employees in the more successful companies and thereby promote a greater sense of employee participation in the economic system.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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