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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Mark Esposito, Amit Kapoor and Sandeep Goyal

The access to high quality, a reliable and affordable basic healthcare service is one of the key challenges facing the rural and semi‐urban population lying at base of the

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Abstract

Purpose

The access to high quality, a reliable and affordable basic healthcare service is one of the key challenges facing the rural and semi‐urban population lying at base of the pyramid (BoP) in India. Realizing this as a social challenge and an economic opportunity (shared value), there has been an emergence of healthcare service providers who have bundled entrepreneurial attitude and passion with available scarce resources to design and implement cost‐effective, reliable and scalable market solutions for the BoP. The purpose of this research paper is to understand the underlying operating principles of these self‐sustainable business models aimed at providing healthcare services to the BoP segment in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical context involves the use of case study research methodology, where the source of data is published case studies and the company websites of four healthcare organizations who have made a socio‐economic difference in the lives of the rural and semi‐urban population lying at the BoP in India.

Findings

The analysis and findings reflect the key operating principles for sustainable healthcare business ventures at the BoP. These include focus on 4A's (accessible, affordable, acceptable and awareness), local engagement, local skills building, learning by experiment, flexible organizational structure, dynamic leadership, technology integration and scalability.

Research limitations/implications

This research study has focused mainly on the published case studies as source of data.

Originality/value

The intent is to understand and bring forth the learning and guiding principles, which act as a catalyst for the future researchers and business ventures engaged in BoP context.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2018

Madhulika Sahoo and Jalandhar Pradhan

The internally displaced persons (IDPs) are often overlooked population, falling between the cracks of international and national commitments. Displaced women and children…

Abstract

Purpose

The internally displaced persons (IDPs) are often overlooked population, falling between the cracks of international and national commitments. Displaced women and children go through more hardship than the male counterpart, as they are frequently at greater risk and do not get adequate access to the reproductive healthcare rights; they suffer from poor health amid threats of eviction. The purpose of this paper is to look into the IDPs reproductive healthcare situation in India and sustainable development goal (SDG) role in addressing the reproductive healthcare rights of the IDPs in India.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on the available literature on reproductive rights of IDPs in India, analysis of the SDGs 3 and other legal safeguards.

Findings

The newly arrived IDPs in the camps have complex needs and health problems. They are susceptible to a number of health problems due to the exposure to physical and environmental threats, violence and trauma. Many of them face a loss of social networks and assets, knowledge and information in the new environment, and lack food security. They have inadequate shelter, healthcare services, sanitation and access to safe water.

Research limitations/implications

This is a viewpoint paper and most of the information in this paper are taken from different sources which are cited in the reference section. There is a lack of sufficient data on IDPs in India. Most of the IDPs figures/data are quoted from Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre and other literature.

Practical implications

To achieve the SDGs by 2030, India needs to take account of all people’s vulnerabilities to address their humanitarian and sustainable development needs. It is important that the development, humanitarian actors, along with the local communities, work collectively to respond to the health needs of the IDPs. Moreover, the active role of the government can provide the necessary assistance to guarantee the rights of IDPs health, adequate standard of living and to social security.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the reproductive healthcare rights of the IDPs in India and the challenges faced by them. It has analyzed the policy gaps. The paper also suggests few measures that can be undertaken to address those challenges under the SDGs.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2020

Mohammad Selim and Mohammad Omar Farooq

The purpose of this paper examines how the challenge of poverty can be effectively addressed by broadly adopting Islamic value based cooperative model (IVCM) where the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper examines how the challenge of poverty can be effectively addressed by broadly adopting Islamic value based cooperative model (IVCM) where the members come together to overcome and eventually eradicate the curse of poverty for themselves and for their future generations.

Design/methodology/approach

The elimination of poverty by adopting IVCM and its impact on the cooperative members, as well as its effects on major macroeconomic variables, are examined on the theoretical ground by using the general equilibrium model of demand and supply-side variables.

Findings

The IVCM for the elimination of poverty reveals that the poverty gap can be eliminated through resource mobilization, as well as by creating new and additional income, wealth and resources through collaborative efforts. Through cooperative organizations based on Islamic values and principles, eventually, the entire poverty pool can enjoy income-earning opportunities through employment or self-employment, as well as promoting skills and education, leading to breaking the vicious cycle of poverty.

Originality/value

Cooperatives in general and Islamic cooperatives, in particular, are not new in the discourse about poverty. Indeed, there are cooperatives throughout the Muslim world and beyond and there are many studies related to cooperatives and their role in development. However, this might be the first theoretical contribution that models the role and impact of cooperatives in a macroeconomic framework, and thus, advances the scientific repertoire of knowledge and understanding about the related discourse by developing a rigorous mathematical model.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

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Case study
Publication date: 10 January 2017

N. Ravichandran and Malay Patel

The case documents the evolution of an eye care hospital promoted by a not-for profit organization located in Mandvi, Surat, close to the tribal community of Gujarat…

Abstract

The case documents the evolution of an eye care hospital promoted by a not-for profit organization located in Mandvi, Surat, close to the tribal community of Gujarat state, India. In a short span of five years (as of 2016), the trust has evolved as a community hospital. The value proposition of the trust is a portfolio of activities, which includes awareness by education, prevention of eye care diseases through eye screening camps, treatment, and rehabilitation on need basis and addressing direct and indirect healthcare needs of the community. The managerial challenge before the board of trustees is to carefully balance (a) The purpose for which the trust was created, (b) the gap between the ground realities and the need in the relevant tribal community (c) the accomplishments of the eye hospital so far.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Richard Blewitt

In this final article, Richard Blewitt describes his distinguished career to date, which, until joining HelpAge International, had been focused on a variety of issues and…

Abstract

In this final article, Richard Blewitt describes his distinguished career to date, which, until joining HelpAge International, had been focused on a variety of issues and generations. From the outset he is very open and honest about his regret for not considering older people more in his previous work. An ambition he is now fulfilling, and with passion, believing that his charity's messages are finally getting through.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Book part
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Islam Abdelbary

Abstract

Details

Reviving Arab Reform: Development Challenges and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-318-3

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Hoda Mahmoudi

Abstract

Details

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Human Dignity and Human Rights
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-821-6

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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2017

Mette Kollerup, Tine Curtis and Birgitte Schantz Laursen

Employing a participatory approach, the purpose of this paper is to identify possible areas for improvement in visiting nurses’ post-hospital medication management and to…

Abstract

Purpose

Employing a participatory approach, the purpose of this paper is to identify possible areas for improvement in visiting nurses’ post-hospital medication management and to facilitate suggestions for changes in future practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a previous study on visiting nurses’ post-hospital medication management, two workshops were conducted in a visiting nurse department in a Danish municipality.

Findings

The visiting nurses emphasised knowledge of patients’ basic needs and prioritised their performance of context-specific nursing assessments, with a preventive focus as a prerequisite for improved patient safety in post-hospital medication management.

Research limitations/implications

The participatory approach can increase the acceptability and feasibility of changes regarding future practices and thereby reduce the gap between official documents and daily practice. Although the local development of suggestions for changes in practices does not provide general knowledge, a subsequent detailed description of the changes in practices can promote transferability to other healthcare settings after local adjustments are made.

Practical implications

Flexible home healthcare, with stable relationships enabling the continuous assessment of the patient’s needs and symptoms, along with subsequent adjustments being made in care and medical treatment, might enhance patient safety in post-hospital medication management.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the knowledge of the need for integrated care in medication management in patients’ homes. It argues for primary healthcare professionals as “experts in complexity” and suggests a reconsideration of the purchaser-provider division of care to patients with unstable health conditions and complex care needs during the first days following hospital discharge.

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Yousef Saleh Khader

The purpose of this paper is to determine water availability, sanitation and hygiene (WSH) services, and healthcare waste management in Jordan healthcare facilities.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine water availability, sanitation and hygiene (WSH) services, and healthcare waste management in Jordan healthcare facilities.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 19 hospitals (15 public and four private) were selected. The WSH services were assessed in hospitals using the WSH in health facilities assessment tool developed for this purpose.

Findings

All hospitals (100 percent) had a safe water source and most (84.2 percent) had functional water sources to provide enough water for users’ needs. All hospitals had appropriate and sufficient gender separated toilets in the wards and 84.2 percent had the same in outpatient settings. Overall, 84.2 percent had sufficient and functioning handwashing basins with soap and water, and 79.0 percent had sufficient showers. Healthcare waste management was appropriately practiced in all hospitals.

Practical implications

Jordan hospital managers achieved major achievements providing access to drinking water and improved sanitation. However, there are still areas that need improvements, such as providing toilets for patients with special needs, establishing handwashing basins with water and soap near toilets, toilet maintenance and providing sufficient trolleys for collecting hazardous waste. Efforts are needed to integrate WSH service policies with existing national policies on environmental health in health facilities, establish national standards and targets for the various healthcare facilities to increase access and improve services.

Originality/value

There are limited WSH data on healthcare facilities and targets for basic coverage in healthcare facilities are also lacking. A new assessment tool was developed to generate core WSH indicators and to assess WSH services in Jordan’s healthcare facilities. This tool can be used by a non-WSH specialist to quickly assess healthcare facility-related WSH services and sanitary hazards in other countries. This tool identified some areas that need improvements.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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