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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2021

Basharat Hussain, Abdullah Zafar Sheikh, Julie Repper, Theodore Stickley, Stephen Timmons and Mahmood Hussain Shah

This study aims to investigate how British Pakistani people talk about their social identity, in the context of mental health, and how this shapes their experiences and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how British Pakistani people talk about their social identity, in the context of mental health, and how this shapes their experiences and perceptions of care delivered by the National Health Service, UK.

Design/methodology/approach

Eight narrative interviews were conducted among members of the Pakistani community living in a city in the UK. The data were analyzed using a narrative analysis approach using “social identity” as a theoretical lens.

Findings

Considering Pakistani service users as a single social entity, and responding with generic approaches in meeting their mental health needs, may not be helpful in achieving equitable treatment. Study participants reject a simple conceptualization of race and ethnicity and how a response based upon stereotypes is woefully inadequate. The study revealed that people from one ethnic or national background cannot be assumed to have a fixed social identity.

Originality/value

This study broadens understanding of how people from a single ethnic background may construct and view their social identities markedly different to others from the same ethnic group. This has implications for service providers in understanding how their clients’ social identity is treated and understood in practice.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Sabir Zaman, Shahid Irfan, Basharat Hussain, Muhammad Tahir Nawaz and Shazia Khalid

There is increased social discussion of the emerging issues of opioid use, health and well-being of young adults within contemporary Asian society. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

There is increased social discussion of the emerging issues of opioid use, health and well-being of young adults within contemporary Asian society. The purpose of this study is to contribute new knowledge of opioid-using young adults through ethnographic perspectives of the five main cultures of Pakistan. Furthermore, it tried to explore the values of opioid users.

Design/methodology/approach

It is a qualitative study. Semi-structured interview and observation techniques were used to gain the participants’ information, in a non-judgmental environment. Observation and life focus history interview methodology were used for data collection. The sample consisted of 18 male opioid users (approximately three from each area including: Punjab, Khyber Pakhtoon Khah, Balochistan, Sindh, Gilgit Baltistan and Azad Jammu and Kashmir). An interview script was used in interviews after written informed consent. After the detailed interview and observation of non-verbal behaviours, the researchers analysed the data by using the content analysis of qualitative method.

Findings

The result showed that poor relationships, conflicts over property, lack of social support and family problems increased with the use of opioids by individuals. The individual’s mental health, such as hopelessness, curiosity, mistrust and lack of interest in social activities, was the major cause of opioid addiction. Moreover, peer influences and friends may also have played contributing roles in opioids use among men.

Research limitations/implications

The current study added to the understanding of the relationship of different environmental, behavioural and social factors involved in developing opioid use among young individuals. The homogeneity of the sample may have weakened the generalisability of the findings of the study as all participants in the study were male.

Practical implications

Clinicians and allied professionals have shown a great interest in early intervention with opioid users. At the same time, there is a lack of qualitative studies exploring the lived experiences of young opioid users. That is why this study was done, to empower counsellors.

Social implications

Opioids, including heroin, have strong addictive tendencies. They are easily available, particularly in unplanned urban areas of Pakistan. The present study tried to understand the lived experiences and beliefs of opioid users belonging to different cultures of Pakistan.

Originality/value

At the same time, there is a lack of qualitative studies exploring the lived experiences of adult opioid users. Therefore, this study presented 18 interview-based facts from the opioid users belonging to different areas of Pakistan residing in capital of Pakistan. The content of these vignettes was examined in the context of an ethnographic perspective, as it has a strong connection and contribution to drug abuse.

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2019

Julie McGarry, Basharat Hussain and Kim Watts

In the UK, the Identification and Referral to Improve Safety (IRIS) initiative has been developed for use within primary care to support women survivors of domestic…

Abstract

Purpose

In the UK, the Identification and Referral to Improve Safety (IRIS) initiative has been developed for use within primary care to support women survivors of domestic violence and abuse (DVA). However, while evaluated nationally, less is known regarding impact of implementation at a local level. The purpose of this paper is to explore the effectiveness of IRIS within one locality in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study using interviews/focus groups with primary care teams and women who had experienced DVA in one primary care setting in the UK. Interviews with 18 participants from five professional categories including: general practitioners, practice nurses, practice managers, assistant practice managers and practice receptionists. Focus group discussion/interview with seven women who had accessed IRIS. Data were collected between November 2016 and March 2017.

Findings

Five main themes were identified for professionals: Team role approach to training, Professional confidence, Clear pathway for referral and support, Focussed support, Somewhere to meet that is a “safe haven”. For women the following themes were identified: Longevity of DVA; Lifeline; Face to face talking to someone; Support and understood where I was coming from; A place of safety.

Practical implications

IRIS played a significant role in helping primary care professionals to respond effectively. For women IRIS was more proactive and holistic than traditional approaches.

Originality/value

This study was designed to assess the impact that a local level implementation of the national IRIS initiative had on both providers and users of the service simultaneously. The study identifies that a “whole team approach” in the primary care setting is critical to the effectiveness of DVA initiatives.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Holly Blake, Basharat Hussain, Jenny Hand, David Rowlands, Amdani Juma and Catrin Evans

There is a need to increase access to HIV testing in the UK in male migrant communities. The purpose of this paper is to assess the uptake and acceptability of a workplace…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a need to increase access to HIV testing in the UK in male migrant communities. The purpose of this paper is to assess the uptake and acceptability of a workplace HIV testing intervention aimed at increasing access to testing in non-clinical settings.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 20 health check events were delivered at 11 UK organisations employing male migrant workers. Intervention included HIV testing, cholesterol, BMI, blood glucose, blood pressure; tailored health advice; take-away resources; optional post-event text reminders about HIV and general health. Mixed-methods evaluation included exit questionnaires (n=771), follow-up text messages (n=465) and qualitative interviews (n=35) to assess event acceptability. Qualitative data were analysed thematically.

Findings

Attendees were 776 employees from 50 countries (51 per cent male; 30 per cent migrant workers). A total of 52 per cent of attendees undertook an HIV test (75 per cent were first-time testers). In total, 96 per cent considered HIV testing to be an acceptable element of workplace health checks; 79 per cent reported new health-related knowledge; 60 per cent of attendees opted for follow-up text messaging; 26 per cent of text respondents reported independently taking HIV test post-event. High acceptability and uptake of HIV testing was associated with convenience, opportunity taking (through removal of deliberation and intentional test-seeking), and normalisation of HIV testing within a general health check.

Originality/value

This study is the first to demonstrate that opt-in HIV testing can be successfully delivered in the workplace within a multi-component health check. The workplace is an effective means of increasing access to HIV testing in groups at risk for HIV, including male migrant workers.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Lucy A. Tedd

The Arabian Gulf Chapter of the Special Libraries Association (AGC/SLA) was founded in 1992 with the objectives of communicating, disseminating and using information…

Abstract

The Arabian Gulf Chapter of the Special Libraries Association (AGC/SLA) was founded in 1992 with the objectives of communicating, disseminating and using information effectively in the area which covers Bahrain, Dubai, Kuwait, Oman, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. AGC/SLA provides one of the main channels of communication for professional librarians and information scientists in the area and membership comprises staff working in academic, medical, school, governmental and industrial libraries, as well as ‘recreational librarians’ who serve the large, and predominantly ‘ex‐pat’ community, of Aramco in Saudi Arabia, many of whom are working in the oil industry.

Details

Program, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Khalid Mahmood

Describes the library and information science education through the distance teaching system offered by Allama Iqbal Open University in Pakistan. The only open university…

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Abstract

Describes the library and information science education through the distance teaching system offered by Allama Iqbal Open University in Pakistan. The only open university in the country has offered Certificate and Bachelor’s programmes in the subject since 1988 and is planning to offer Master’s and some other advanced programmes in the future. The paper presents a brief history of the University and the establishment of the Department of Library and Information Sciences. Syllabi and objectives of various LIS courses are provided. The system of education, including admissions, study materials, regional services, tutors, study centres, assignments and examination is also described. Enrolment data up to spring 1996 are analyzed (by area and gender). Opinions of senior library professionals in the country about these LIS courses are also cited.

Details

Library Review, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2021

Nisha Bharti and Sushant Malik

The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether focus on social output affects the efficiency of MFIs. Inclusive growth is the key developmental aim for many developing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether focus on social output affects the efficiency of MFIs. Inclusive growth is the key developmental aim for many developing countries, including India. The role of microfinance institutions (MFIs) in promoting financial inclusion is widely applauded. However, to achieve financial sustainability, MFIs have become highly commercialised and are seen to have drifted away from their social mission. Various studies have shown the efficiency of MFIs on financial parameters. MFIs being a social enterprise, it is important to include social output among the efficiency parameters.

Design/methodology/approach

This study attempts to compare the efficiency of MFIs with and without social performances across the various size of MFIs based on their asset, i.e. large, medium and small. This study uses Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) for assessing an MFI’s efficiency. For calculating the social output score, the Gutman Scale is used. Efficiency is calculated with and without social output, and the resulting scores are compared to assess the impact of social performance on the efficiency of MFIs.

Findings

The results of this study allow us to conclude that with the inclusion of social output, the efficiency of MFIs improves across various categories. In terms of social performances, it is concluded that MFIs are targeting women and mostly working in rural areas but have neglected issues like health and education.

Originality/value

The findings of this study will help MFIs in formulating their mission and vision statements and in achieving the objective of financial inclusion without experiencing mission drift.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Saad Ahmed Javed and Sifeng Liu

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the relationship between outpatient satisfaction and the five constructs of healthcare projects’ service quality in Pakistan using…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the relationship between outpatient satisfaction and the five constructs of healthcare projects’ service quality in Pakistan using Deng’s grey incidence analysis (GIA) model, absolute degree GIA model (ADGIA), a novel second synthetic degree GIA (SSDGIA) model and two approaches of decision-making under uncertainty.

Design/methodology/approach

The study proposes a new synthetic GIA model and demonstrates its feasibility on data (N=221) collected from both public and private sector healthcare projects of Punjab, the most populous province of Pakistan, using a self-administered questionnaire developed using the original SERVQUAL approach.

Findings

The results of decision analysis approach indicated that outpatients’ satisfaction from the private sector healthcare projects is higher as compared to the public healthcare projects’. The results from the proposed model revealed that tangibility and reliability play an important role in shaping the patient satisfaction in the public and private sectors, respectively.

Originality/value

The study is pioneer in evaluating a healthcare system’s service quality using grey system theory. The study proposes the SSDGIA model as a novel method to evaluate parameters comprehensively based on their mutual association (given by absolute degree of grey incidence) and inter-dependencies (given by Deng’s degree of grey incidence), and tests the new model in the given scenario. The study is novel in terms of its analysis of data and modelling. The study also proposes a comprehensive structure of the healthcare delivery system of Pakistan.

Details

Grey Systems: Theory and Application, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-9377

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