Search results

1 – 9 of 9
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Herm Joosten, Josée Bloemer and Bas Hillebrand

Focusing on decisional control of the outcome provides only a partial picture of how firms may handle customer complaints and ignores many (alternative) opportunities to…

Downloads
1317

Abstract

Purpose

Focusing on decisional control of the outcome provides only a partial picture of how firms may handle customer complaints and ignores many (alternative) opportunities to recover the relationship with the customer when service delivery fails. The purpose of this paper is to introduce other types of control and explore their effects.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conducts a field study using survey instruments to collect data from real consumers, which are subsequently analyzed with structural equations modeling.

Findings

The main conclusion of this study is that there is more to control than having a choice. Different types of control have differential main effects: behavioral control affects distributive justice, cognitive control affects procedural justice and decisional control affects interactional justice (which in turn affect satisfaction and loyalty).

Research limitations/implications

Service recovery research should include behavioral, cognitive and decisional control of the service recovery as aspects of the firm’s organizational response to customer complaints. The effects of these customer control types on satisfaction and loyalty are mediated by dimensions of justice.

Practical implications

Firms should offer complaining customers information to interpret and appraise the failure (cognitive control), opportunities to personally take action and influence the recovery (behavioral control), and choices in the recovery process and outcome (decisional control).

Originality/value

This study is the first to offer a comprehensive investigation of the subtle interrelationships between types of control and dimensions of justice in a service recovery context.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Timothy Lee Keiningham, Zeya He, Bas Hillebrand, Jichul Jang, Courtney Suess and Laurie Wu

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between innovation and authenticity by developing a conceptual framework that illuminates the key constructs.

Downloads
1061

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between innovation and authenticity by developing a conceptual framework that illuminates the key constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a common perspective – the customer – for both innovation and authenticity. A conceptual framework identifying the roles of centrality and distinctiveness in the innovation–authenticity relationship is developed and justified based upon prior research regarding brand extensions and authenticity.

Findings

The innovation–authenticity relationship can be visualized and managed using two constructs: centrality and distinctiveness. Centrality is proposed to have a positive relationship, whereas distinctiveness is proposed to have a non-linear (inverted-U) relationship.

Originality/value

The paper contributes a new conceptualization of the innovation–authenticity–loyalty relationship. It applies C–D Mapping in a completely new way to provide managerially relevant visualization of customers’ perceptions of a new innovation vis-à-vis the parent brand to guide strategic decision making. The paper also suggests areas for further research to improve our understanding of successful innovation–authenticity alignment.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 March 2016

Herm Joosten, Josée Bloemer and Bas Hillebrand

Research on empowerment and service co-production assumed that customers want more control and that more control is better. An empirical test of this assumption, however…

Downloads
1353

Abstract

Purpose

Research on empowerment and service co-production assumed that customers want more control and that more control is better. An empirical test of this assumption, however, is lacking. This study tests this assumption by not only focusing on the customer’s capacity and opportunity for control, but also taking into account the customer’s desire for control.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses an experiment employing video clips depicting a service encounter in a banking context in which control beliefs are manipulated.

Findings

This study shows that more control in services is not always better because individuals vary in their desire for control; that state-measures of control are effective predictors of relevant attitudinal and behavioral effects like satisfaction and loyalty, and that the mechanism which produces these effects is the consistency between control beliefs.

Research limitations/implications

Future research on customer empowerment and service co-production should acknowledge the pivotal role of variations in desire for control, focus on inconsistencies in control beliefs to predict effects, and measure control beliefs as varying states rather than as stable personality traits.

Practical implications

Enhancing customer control of a service may primarily mean: giving the customer the option to control or not to control the service.

Originality/value

This study contributes to literature and marketing practice by demonstrating that more control may have negative effects and by demonstrating the mechanism by which these effects occur.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Allard C.R. van Riel, Giulia Calabretta, Paul H. Driessen, Bas Hillebrand, Ashlee Humphreys, Manfred Krafft and Sander F.M. Beckers

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the service constellation perspective affects innovation strategies and potentially contributes to the innovation…

Downloads
3879

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the service constellation perspective affects innovation strategies and potentially contributes to the innovation literature, proposing a research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

By analyzing the notion of a service constellation, the authors provide an overview of major implications for service innovation research and practice.

Findings

Firms and service innovation researchers need to focus on the perceived consumer value of the constellation rather than on individual services. The authors illustrate how service innovation from the constellation perspective requires coordination and synchronization between projects and different approaches to portfolio management and screening.

Originality/value

Adoption of the service constellation perspective creates new opportunities.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2011

Bas Hillebrand and Wim G. Biemans

In B2B markets, the demand for a supplier's products is derived from demand further down the supply chain. This complexity poses several challenges for B2B firms…

Downloads
3122

Abstract

Purpose

In B2B markets, the demand for a supplier's products is derived from demand further down the supply chain. This complexity poses several challenges for B2B firms, especially when they are located near the beginning of a supply chain. This study aims to investigate to what extent firms near the beginning of the supply chain are oriented towards downstream customers, the problems they encounter in extending their market orientation to include downstream customers, and how they deal with these problems.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses an exploratory research method. It is based on in‐depth interviews with 31 managers from 21 upstream suppliers.

Findings

The findings suggest that firms are aware of the importance of downstream customers, but frequently fail to establish effective relationships with them. The paper identifies several barriers that hamper an orientation on downstream customers and shows how firms may deal with these barriers.

Research limitations/implications

The paper includes several implications for further research, including the suggestion to test a set of seven propositions.

Practical implications

This study identifies several barriers that may prevent a firm from implementing a downstream customer orientation as well as several strategies to deal with these barriers.

Originality/value

The paper explores the neglected implications of derived demand, one of the most distinctive characteristics of B2B marketing.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Bas Hillebrand, Ron G.M. Kemp and Edwin J. Nijssen

The aim of this paper is to investigate the differential effect of customer orientation and future market focus on organization inertia and firm innovativeness of small…

Downloads
3285

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate the differential effect of customer orientation and future market focus on organization inertia and firm innovativeness of small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) in the business‐to‐business service industry. It is motivated by the observation that small and medium‐sized service firms' proxy to customers may lead to incremental service improvement in response to customer requests for customization and improvement, but may derail programs for more innovative services.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey among 217 small and medium‐sized service firms is used to test the hypotheses developed. The data are analyzed using a path model and Lisrel software.

Findings

The results show that customer orientation breeds inertia, whereas future market focus increases the willingness to cannibalize existing technology, service portfolio and routines, which in turn stimulates firm innovativeness.

Research limitations/implications

The results suggest that it is important to distinguish between customer orientation and future market focus, and that particularly small and medium‐sized firms may require both orientations for sustained firm performance. Future research may be directed at developing tools for monitoring against inertia and helping managers to decide more objectively when to listen to their current customers and when not to.

Practical implications

The results suggest managers should complement customer orientation with activities and management attention geared towards developing future market vision.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to simultaneously investigate the role of customer orientation and future market focus for small and medium‐sized firms in the service industry.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2018

Sven Tuzovic, Jochen Wirtz and Loizos Heracleous

How can some companies be the innovation leader in their industry over prolonged periods of time, whereas others cannot? The purpose of this study is to understand a…

Downloads
2153

Abstract

Purpose

How can some companies be the innovation leader in their industry over prolonged periods of time, whereas others cannot? The purpose of this study is to understand a firm’s capability to be a successful serial innovator and to generate a constant stream of industry-leading innovations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a longitudinal case study approach to gain an understanding of what and how Singapore Airlines sustained service innovation for over 30 years. The study uses triangulation, whereby the core data from in-depth interviews with senior and middle management and frontline employees were complemented with academic research, case studies, annual reports, observations and archival documents. In total, 240 single-spaced pages of interview transcripts with over 130,000 words were analyzed and coded using MAXQDA for identifying repeated patterns of meaning.

Findings

The authors identified three key institutional foundations for service innovation: innovation climate (i.e. leadership and service culture), human capital (i.e. recruitment, training and development and engagement and incentives) and resource configurations (i.e. systems, structure and processes). These foundations enabled the organization to build the following four service innovation-related dynamic capabilities: embrace ambidexterity, institutionalize learning and knowledge integration, orchestrate collaboration and reinvent customer value. Interestingly, these institutional foundations and capabilities remained largely stable across 30 years; what changed were the contexts and specifics, not the foundations and capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected only from one company. Because of the method of thematic analysis, the generalizability of the findings needs further investigation.

Originality/value

This study is the first to investigate the drivers of industry-leading sustained service innovation over a prolonged period of time. The proposed framework provides a fuller and more integrated picture of sustained service innovation than past cross-sectional studies.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Liliane Abboud, Nabila As'ad, Nicola Bilstein, Annelies Costers, Bieke Henkens and Katrien Verleye

Dyadic interactions between customers and service providers rarely occur in isolation. Still, there is a lack of systematic knowledge about the roles that different types…

Abstract

Purpose

Dyadic interactions between customers and service providers rarely occur in isolation. Still, there is a lack of systematic knowledge about the roles that different types of nontechnological third parties – that is, other customers, pets, other employees and other firms – can adopt in relation to customers and service providers during encounters. The present study aims to unravel these roles and highlight their implications for customers, service providers and/or third parties.

Design/methodology/approach

This research relies on a systematic review of literature in the Web of Science using a search string pertaining to the research study’s objectives. In total, 2,726 articles were screened by title and abstract using clear inclusion and exclusion criteria, thereby extracting 189 articles for full-text eligibility. The final sample consisted of 139 articles for coding and analysis.

Findings

The analyses reveal that other customers, pets, other employees and other firms can adopt five roles: bystander, connector, endorser, balancer and partner. Each role has different implications for customers, service providers and/or third parties. Additionally, the five roles are associated with distinct constellations of the customer, the service provider and the third party. These roles and constellations are dynamic and not mutually exclusive.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the service encounter literature by providing a thorough understanding of the various third-party roles and their implications for customers, service providers and/or third parties during encounters. As such, this research sheds light on the conditions under which third parties become “significant others” in service encounters and identifies avenues for future research.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Michael Christofi, Erasmia Leonidou, Demetris Vrontis, Phillip Kitchen and Ioanna Papasolomou

– This paper aims to illustrate how innovation typologies may lead to cause-related marketing (CRM) success when applied to services.

Downloads
2752

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illustrate how innovation typologies may lead to cause-related marketing (CRM) success when applied to services.

Design/methodology/approach

Hence, the paper identifies product/service and brand factors that underpin CRM success, undertakes an innovation theory application in CRM and examines its theoretical and practical significance.

Findings

The paper develops a conceptual framework that may serve to facilitate CRM success.

Originality/value

Intended contributions include: a critical review of academic research related to CRM success; identification of underdeveloped connections between five innovation types and CRM success; enrichment of the innovation and CRM literature by developing a framework that combines these; managerial guidelines to achieve successful CRM practice in services; and an agenda for future research in CRM via a multi-dimensional concept of innovation.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

1 – 9 of 9