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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Kate Yue Zhang and Bart Rienties

Global staffing has remained a main focus within the field of international human resource management (IHRM) since the 1970s. However, research in the psychological…

Abstract

Purpose

Global staffing has remained a main focus within the field of international human resource management (IHRM) since the 1970s. However, research in the psychological contract (PC) of expatriates is limited. The purpose of this paper is to explore the differences in PC breach and violation for organisational expatriates and self-initiated expatriates (SIEs).

Design/methodology/approach

A survey questionnaire was developed covering 52 organisational expatriates and 119 SIEs from 35 countries/regions working in China. Four follow-up focus group interviews including four organisational expatriates and 12 SIEs were conducted to further explain the findings of the survey.

Findings

The findings indicate that organisational expatriates experience significantly lower levels of PC breach and violation than SIEs. Three broad thematic areas arose from the triangulation of focus group interviews, including uncertainties in functioning of contracts, differences in job securities and career development opportunities, and cultural differences.

Practical implications

Employers should give a comprehensive orientation and cultural training to meet the needs of SIEs. Moreover, long-term career advancement paths should also be provided to SIEs to alleviate their vulnerability and insecurities working abroad.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the scholarship of self-initiated expatriation and PCs and give implications to IHRM strategies.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Dirk Tempelaar, Bart Rienties and Quan Nguyen

This empirical study aims to demonstrate how the combination of trace data derived from technology-enhanced learning environments and self-response survey data can…

Abstract

Purpose

This empirical study aims to demonstrate how the combination of trace data derived from technology-enhanced learning environments and self-response survey data can contribute to the investigation of self-regulated learning processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a showcase based on 1,027 students’ learning in a blended introductory quantitative course, the authors analysed the learning regulation and especially the timing of learning by trace data. Next, the authors connected these learning patterns with self-reports based on multiple contemporary social-cognitive theories.

Findings

The authors found that several behavioural facets of maladaptive learning orientations, such as lack of regulation, self-sabotage or disengagement negatively impacted the amount of practising, as well as timely practising. On the adaptive side of learning dispositions, the picture was less clear. Where some adaptive dispositions, such as the willingness to invest efforts in learning and self-perceived planning skills, positively impacted learning regulation and timing of learning, other dispositions such as valuing school or academic buoyancy lacked the expected positive effects.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the blended design, there is a strong asymmetry between what one can observe on learning in both modes.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates that in a blended setup, one needs to distinguish the grand effect on learning from the partial effect on learning in the digital mode: the most adaptive students might be less dependent for their learning on the use of the digital learning mode.

Originality/value

The paper presents an application of embodied motivation in the context of blended learning.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2021

Jekaterina Rogaten and Bart Rienties

In the last five years, there has been an increased interest across the globe, and in the United Kingdom in particular, to define, conceptualise and measure learning…

Abstract

In the last five years, there has been an increased interest across the globe, and in the United Kingdom in particular, to define, conceptualise and measure learning gains. The concept of learning gains, briefly summarised as the improvement in knowledge, skills, work-readiness and personal development made by students during their time spent in higher education, has been hailed by some as an opportunity to measure ‘excellence’ in teaching. This chapter will review some of the common definitions and the methods employed in research on learning gains. Secondly, we will provide a critical evaluation of the computational aspects of learning gains (e.g., raw gain, normalised gain). Finally, we will critically reflect upon the lessons learnt and what is not yet known in terms of learning gains.

Details

Learning Gain in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-280-5

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Vicki Holmes, Wilma Clark, Paul Burt and Bart Rienties

Information and Communication Technology offers powerful Web 2.0 tools that can benefit learners with different learning preferences. The rise of video streaming, the…

Abstract

Information and Communication Technology offers powerful Web 2.0 tools that can benefit learners with different learning preferences. The rise of video streaming, the increased proliferation of ‘on demand’ televisual media and new smartphone streaming opportunities have generated a range of web-based media that may usefully support teachers and learners in accommodating these varied learning styles. At the same time, media streaming technologies such as YouTube have distinct drawbacks for students, teachers and their institutions, particularly in relation to appropriate content and the ethical issues around the uploading of student materials to a public repository.

Two studies are reported. In Study 1, two case studies of how teachers engaged students with a media-streaming system called Box of Broadcasts (BoB) are discussed using principles of design-based research. The result from the first case study indicated that BoB provided an improved efficiency for teachers who filmed students’ presentations in a second language. The second case study illustrated how the integration of BoB into their classroom teaching led a psychology teacher to think differently about students and the design and delivery of teaching and learning resources. In Study 2, the use of a qualitative semi-structured interview approach with eight teachers indicated that staff felt that BoB was beneficial in supporting pedagogic practice. Furthermore, staff highlighted the opportunities for dialogue about theory, reality and practice that video materials offered to students as added value. Key limitations for some staff in their use of BoB as a support for video-enriched pedagogic practice were the restricted level of available content on BoB, some difficulties relating to the skills required for creating and using clips and technical stability when using clips.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Mobile Applications: Smartphones, Skype and Texting Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-509-8

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Book part
Publication date: 24 April 2019

Jenna Mittelmeier, Divya Jindal-Snape, Bart Rienties, Kate Yue Zhang and Doris Yakun Chen

Supervisors and other academic staff can provide PhD students with invaluable professional support and opportunities for advancing their careers. This stems from the…

Abstract

Supervisors and other academic staff can provide PhD students with invaluable professional support and opportunities for advancing their careers. This stems from the strong academic and networking provisions often offered to PhD students by nature of the supervisory mentorship. Although this professional relationship is highly beneficial in itself, many PhD students also wish to develop social and more personal friendships with their supervisors, in addition to academic connections. In this way, PhD students may seek a space to comfortably share their personal lives, identities, and experiences with supervisors and develop a working and personal relationship that extends beyond their doctoral program.

In order to better support how and why PhD students build social and personal relationships with their supervisors, this chapter draws upon evidence from an international collaboration across three institutions in the United Kingdom and China related to doctoral students’ social transition experiences. Building on our experience using an innovative mixed method combination of social network analysis, longitudinal diaries, blogs, and in-depth interviews, we explore the complex, dynamic, and, at times, turbulent social relationships between PhD students and supervisors. Specifically, this chapter provides tips for PhD students to manage and maintain social relationships with their supervisors in order to build lasting connections. This includes advice for establishing personal acquaintanceships between students and supervisors and bridging the gap from supervisor to colleague to friend. Altogether, readers will consider actionable steps for developing socially meaningful and sincere relationships with supervisors or other mentors.

Details

Getting the Most Out of Your Doctorate
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-905-2

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2021

Abstract

Details

Learning Gain in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-280-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Abstract

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Mobile Applications: Smartphones, Skype and Texting Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-509-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 24 April 2019

Abstract

Details

Getting the Most Out of Your Doctorate
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-905-2

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Dirk Ifenthaler, Demetrios G. Sampson, Michael J. Spector and Pedro Isaias

Abstract

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Jan Selmer

Abstract

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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