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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Milica Milutinovic and Bart De Decker

The medical advances and historical fluctuations in the demographics are contributing to the rise of the average age. These changes are increasing the pressure to organize…

Abstract

Purpose

The medical advances and historical fluctuations in the demographics are contributing to the rise of the average age. These changes are increasing the pressure to organize adequate care to a growing number of individuals. As a way to provide efficient and cost-effective care, eHealth systems are gaining importance. However, this trend is creating new ethical concerns. Major issues are privacy and patients’ control over their data. To deploy these systems on a large scale, they need to offer strict privacy protection. Even though many research proposals focus on eHealth systems and related ethical requirements, there is an evident lack of practical solutions for protecting users’ personal information. The purpose of this study is to explore the ethical considerations related to these systems and extract the privacy requirements. This paper also aims to put forth a system design which ensures appropriate privacy protection.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper investigates the existing work in the area of eHealth systems and the related ethical considerations, which establish privacy as one of the main requirements. It lists the ethical requirements and data protection standards that a system needs to fulfil and uses them as a guideline for creating the proposed design.

Findings

Even though privacy is considered to be a paramount aspect of the eHealth systems, the existing proposals do not tackle this issue from the outset of the design. Consequently, introducing privacy at the final stages of the system deployment imposes significant limitations and the provided data protection is not always to the standards expected by the users.

Originality/value

This paper motivates the need for addressing ethical concerns in the eHealth domain with special focus on establishing strict privacy protection. It lists the privacy requirements and offers practical solutions for developing a privacy-friendly system and takes the approach of privacy-by-design. Additionally, the proposed design is evaluated against ethical principles as proposed in the existing literature. The aim is to show that technological advances can be used to improve quality and efficiency of care, while the usually raised concerns can be avoided.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1962

FOURTEEN years ago 16% of all employees in our manufacturing industries were what are commonly described as ‘white collar’ workers. They belonged to the group that…

Abstract

FOURTEEN years ago 16% of all employees in our manufacturing industries were what are commonly described as ‘white collar’ workers. They belonged to the group that includes clerical, technical and administrative staffs. If that seems a very high proportion what can be thought of the fact that by 1960 the figure had risen to 21%? The actual rate of growth is even more startling. During that 12 years the total number of employees in manufacturing industry increased by 12% but in the same period the ‘white collar’ workers in that section of the economy rose by 48%, according to figures issued by the Ministry of Labour.

Details

Work Study, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1962

FOURTEEN years ago 16% of all employees in our manufacturing industries were what are commonly described as ‘white collar’ workers. They belonged to the group that…

Abstract

FOURTEEN years ago 16% of all employees in our manufacturing industries were what are commonly described as ‘white collar’ workers. They belonged to the group that includes clerical, technical and administrative staffs. If that seems a very high proportion what can be thought of the fact that by 1960 the figure had risen to 21%? The actual rate of growth is even more startling. During that 12 years the total number of employees in manufacturing industry increased by 12% but in the same period the ‘white collar’ workers in that section of the economy rose by 48%, according to figures issued by the Ministry of Labour.

Details

Work Study, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Book part
Publication date: 7 March 2013

Melissa Newberry

Emotions are complex concepts involving multiple systems within the body and mind. How, when and for what purpose emotions are expressed is based on context and…

Abstract

Emotions are complex concepts involving multiple systems within the body and mind. How, when and for what purpose emotions are expressed is based on context and relationships. In this chapter I take a relational view of emotion and emotion regulation as applied in classroom settings. I first discuss the concepts of emotion and emotion regulation before exploring the physical, social and psychological processes involved in both producing and regulating emotions. Although teachers use, respond to and regulate emotions as part of their everyday work, I suggest that teachers are underprepared for the extent of the emotion work they encounter, or the cost it may have on their emotional reserves. The requirements to successfully navigate emotions in today's educational environment are underappreciated. Only when we acknowledge the relational and cognitive tasks required of teachers under the demand of multiple relationships and the constraints of the responsibilities placed upon them can we fully appreciate the magnitude of the endeavour.

Details

Emotion and School: Understanding how the Hidden Curriculum Influences Relationships, Leadership, Teaching, and Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-651-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Sanjukta Choudhury Kaul, Manjit Singh Sandhu and Quamrul Alam

This study aims to explore the role of the Indian merchant class in 19th-century colonial India in addressing the social concerns of disability. Specifically, it addresses…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the role of the Indian merchant class in 19th-century colonial India in addressing the social concerns of disability. Specifically, it addresses why and how business engaged with disability in colonial India.

Design/methodology/approach

This study’s methodology entailed historiographical approach and archival investigation of official correspondence and letters of business people in 19th-century colonial India.

Findings

Using institutional theory, the study’s findings indicate that guided by philanthropic and ethical motives, Indian businesses, while recognizing the normative and cognitive challenges, accepted the regulative institutional pressures of colonial India and adopted an involved and humane approach. This manifested in the construction of asylums and the setting up of bequeaths and charitable funds for people with disability (PwD). The principal institutional drivers in making of the asylums and the creation of benevolent charities were religion, social practices, caste-based expectations, exposure to Western education and Victorian and Protestantism ideologies, the emergence of colonial notions of health, hygiene and medicine, carefully crafted socio-political and economic policies of the British Raj and the social aspirations of the native merchant class.

Originality/value

In contrast to the 20th-century rights-based movement of the West, which gave birth to the global term of “disability,” a collective representation of different types of disabilities, this paper locates that cloaked in individual forms of sickness, the identity of PwD in 19th-century colonial India appeared under varied fragmented labels such as those of leper, lunatic, blind and infirm. This paper broadens the understanding of how philanthropic business response to disability provided social acceptability and credibility to business people as benevolent members of society. While parallelly, for PwD, it reinforced social marginalization and the need for institutionalization, propagating perceptions of unfortunate and helpless members of society.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2018

Frank Jan De Graaf

The purpose of this paper is to examine the history of the Dutch cooperative Rabobank to understand how the structure of an organisation determines how individual…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the history of the Dutch cooperative Rabobank to understand how the structure of an organisation determines how individual employees validate norms within that organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data over an approximately 10-year period starting 25 years ago are analysed, and the value of relating a historical analysis and narrative approach to ethical and institutional theories in economics and management science is demonstrated.

Findings

Regulation in the banking sector appears to have a strong normative aspect. The choice between state and private ownership is based on ideology. The author argues that the private ownership model was based primarily on an ideology surrounding economic efficiency, but that in fact there are other logics that also promote economic development. This contributes to the understanding of the interaction between sector standards, organisational structures and the values of organisations and individual employees. The structure of an organisation enables key employees to deviate slightly from the organisation’s prevailing norms in response to pressures from the wider environment, and those individuals thereby become symbols of that organisation.

Originality/value

The perspective on management history put forward in this paper enables assessing the distinction between normative notions in institutional environments and the organisation as a whole as represented in its governance structure and narratives that key employees disseminate about the organisation. This in turn helps us to understand the interaction between sector standards, organisational characteristics and values represented by individual employees. The author reveals the strong normative impact of banking regulation in line with an older ideological model focused on economic efficiency rather than market logics and the interests of society.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Amaan Nathoo, Girish Bekaroo, Tanveer Gangabissoon and Aditya Santokhee

This paper aims to explore the use of tangible user interfaces for teaching concepts related to internet of things by focusing on two aspects, notably, usability and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the use of tangible user interfaces for teaching concepts related to internet of things by focusing on two aspects, notably, usability and learning effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

To assess the usability of IoTTT, Nielsen’s principles were used due to its relevance and popularity for usability assessment. In the usability questionnaire, four attributes were evaluated, notably, learnability, efficiency, errors and satisfaction. As for evaluating learning effectiveness, learning assessment was conducted through pre-tests and post-tests. Two groups of 20 students participated where the first group attended conventional lectures on IoT, whereas the second group used IoTTT for learning same concepts. In the process, data was collected through the usability questionnaire and tests for usability and learning effectiveness assessment.

Findings

Results revealed a positive score for the usability of the TUI solution with an average rating of 3.9. Although this score demonstrated an acceptable solution, different issues were identified, based on which a set of recommendations have been made in this paper. On the other hand, in the common pre-tests, an average score of 6.40 was obtained as compared to a mean score of 7.33 in the post-tests for all participants. Knowledge gains were significantly higher for students who learnt IoT concepts through the TUI-based system where performance improved by 18 per cent.

Originality/value

The results revealed in this study are expected to help the research community, course designers and tutors comprehend the prospects of using tangible user interfaces to foster teaching and learning of IoT concepts. In addition, educational solution providers could consider commercialisation prospects of this technology to innovate in teaching and learning, while also building-up on limitations identified within this study.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2021

Selim Aren, Hatice Nayman Hamamci and Safvan Özcan

The aim of this study, the moderating effect of pleasure-seeking and loss aversion, was investigated in relation to the big five personality traits with regard to risky…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study, the moderating effect of pleasure-seeking and loss aversion, was investigated in relation to the big five personality traits with regard to risky investment intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

In the study, the data was obtained between January and November 2019 via an online survey with convenience sampling. The total number of subjects is 886. The authors used IBM SPSS Statistics for analysis. Exploratory factor analysis, correlation analysis, regression analysis and discriminant analysis were performed.

Findings

Significant relationships were found between five personality traits and risky investment intentions. In these relationships, the moderator effect of pleasure-seeking for extraversion, conscientiousness and neuroticism personality traits was also determined. Besides, investment preferences for choosing “unknown and new investment” against “known and experienced investment”, which is a typical feature of the balloon periods, were modeled with big five personality traits and motivation variables (pleasure-seeking and loss aversion) and the equation was formed. As a result, high accuracy classification success was obtained.

Originality/value

The study is unique owing to its findings. In addition, general risk aversion and risky investment intention were investigated simultaneously to explain the different findings in the literature regarding the attitude of big five personality traits to risk and personality traits that show consistent approach were identified.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 50 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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