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1 – 10 of 138

Abstract

Economists and sociologists have proposed arguments for why there can exist wage penalties for work involving helping and caring for others, penalties borne disproportionately by women. Evidence on wage penalties is neither abundant nor compelling. We examine wage differentials associated with caring jobs using multiple years of Current Population Survey (CPS) earnings files matched to O*NET job descriptors that provide continuous measures of “assisting & caring” and “concern” for others across all occupations. This approach differs from prior studies that assume occupations either do or do not require a high level of caring. Cross-section and longitudinal analyses are used to examine wage differences associated with the level of caring, conditioned on worker, location, and job attributes. Wage level estimates suggest substantive caring penalties, particularly among men. Longitudinal estimates based on wage changes among job switchers indicate smaller wage penalties, our preferred estimate being a 2% wage penalty resulting from a one standard deviation increase in our caring index. We find little difference in caring wage gaps across the earnings distribution. Measuring mean levels of caring across the U.S. labor market over nearly thirty years, we find a steady upward trend, but overall changes are small and there is no evidence of convergence between women and men.

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Gender Convergence in the Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-456-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

In the first, by David A. Macpherson and Barry T. Hirsch, entitled “Wages and Gender Composition: Why Do Women's Jobs Pay Less?” occupational sex segregation and its…

Abstract

In the first, by David A. Macpherson and Barry T. Hirsch, entitled “Wages and Gender Composition: Why Do Women's Jobs Pay Less?” occupational sex segregation and its relationship with wages during 1973–93 are examined. Wage level and wage change models are estimated using Current Population Survey data matched with measures of occupational skills and job disamenities. Standard analysis confirms that wage levels are substantially lower in predominantly female occupations. Gender composition effects are reduced by about a quarter for women and by over one‐half for men following control for skill‐related occupational characteristics. Longitudinal analysis indicates that two‐thirds or more of the standard gender composition effect is accounted for by occupational characteristics and unmeasured worker skill or taste differences.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Book part
Publication date: 20 May 2005

Warren J. Samuels

William Breit’s brilliant idea was to commission a Nobel Economists Lecture Series at Trinity University that induced recipients to write autobiographical essays on their…

Abstract

William Breit’s brilliant idea was to commission a Nobel Economists Lecture Series at Trinity University that induced recipients to write autobiographical essays on their individual evolution as an economist. This fourth edition presents eighteen such essays. Breit had two intellectual purposes in mind. One objective was to identify common themes in the laureates’ description of their development as economists. The second objective was to use the materials provided in the essays to examine the question of the role of biography in the development of modern economics as a contribution to a theory of scientific discovery.

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A Research Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-316-7

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Research in Labor Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-584-1

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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2001

James A. Freeman and Barry T. Hirsch

This study estimates earnings function parameters across alternative occupational paths, with an emphasis on identifying rates of return to post-school human capital…

Abstract

This study estimates earnings function parameters across alternative occupational paths, with an emphasis on identifying rates of return to post-school human capital investment. Based on cross-sectional and synthetic cohort analysis using the 1973–2000 Current Population Surveys, estimates are obtained for men and women on the returns to schooling and the investment intensity, length, and returns from post-school training. Although the shapes of wage-experience profiles differ substantially across occupations and skill groups, evidence supports the theoretical prediction that rates of return are equivalent across alternative investment paths. Little evidence is found for an increase in returns to post-school training over time. By the 1990s, returns to schooling had risen to a level similar to the returns from post-school training.

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Worker Wellbeing in a Changing Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-130-9

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Population Change, Labor Markets and Sustainable Growth: Towards a New Economic Paradigm
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44453-051-6

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The Creation and Analysis of Employer-Employee Matched Data
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44450-256-8

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The Creation and Analysis of Employer-Employee Matched Data
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44450-256-8

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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2001

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Worker Wellbeing in a Changing Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-130-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Don Bellante, Carl A. Kogut and Raul Moncarz

The effect of the relative supply of Hispanics onthe relative earnings of Blacks in US labourmarkets is examined. The data source for theempirical estimates is the March…

Abstract

The effect of the relative supply of Hispanics on the relative earnings of Blacks in US labour markets is examined. The data source for the empirical estimates is the March 1988 Current Population Survey. The results support one of the key features of the Becker model of discrimination, namely, that the extent of discrimination is affected by relative supply. Results also indicated that an increase in the number of Hispanics in a local labour market will reduce the income of otherwise comparable Blacks. However, if the Black labour supply in a local labour market is sufficiently large, a given percentage increase in the relative supply of Blacks will have a more negative impact on average Black earnings than would the same percentage increase in the number of Hispanics.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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1 – 10 of 138