Search results

1 – 10 of 318
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Barry Quinn and Nicholas Alexander

Franchising has become a major driving force in the globalisation of service businesses. Likewise, international retailing has become an important feature of global…

Abstract

Franchising has become a major driving force in the globalisation of service businesses. Likewise, international retailing has become an important feature of global distribution systems. This has been brought about through changing socio‐economic patterns, favourable political and cultural environments, and a shift from manufacturing to service based economies. Both developments have contributed to the globalisation of marketing activity. However, there remain fundamental conceptual inconsistencies in the literatures that explain the development of international retailing and the internationalisation of franchise operations. This paper considers the use of franchising in the internationalisation of retail operations and places the experience of retail operations that use the market entry strategy within the context of other franchising activity. The paper evaluates the literature on the internationalisation of retailing alongside the literature on franchising. It identifies the different perspectives that have emerged within the two literatures and conceptually reconciles the contradictions that exist.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Anne Marie Doherty and Barry Quinn

International retailers are increasingly using franchising as a means of entering foreign markets. However, international retail franchising lacks a conceptual basis from…

Abstract

International retailers are increasingly using franchising as a means of entering foreign markets. However, international retail franchising lacks a conceptual basis from which an explanation of the major elements of this activity can be generated. Agency theory and its major premises of information asymmetry, monitoring costs, moral hazard and opportunism, are introduced in an attempt to provide an initial effort at bridging this conceptual gap. The paper reviews international retailing and franchise research before explaining agency theory. A discussion follows on how agency theory can explain major elements of international franchise activity of retail firms such as the international retail franchise process and the operationalisation of the international retail franchise system.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Nicholas Alexander and Barry Quinn

The divestment of international retail operations is an under‐explored area of research. Conceptual and theoretical developments within retailing have tended to focus on…

Abstract

The divestment of international retail operations is an under‐explored area of research. Conceptual and theoretical developments within retailing have tended to focus on those organisations that have sustained international development rather than on those organisations who have experienced market failure and strategic withdrawals from international markets. The paper discusses two prominent UK cases where market withdrawal has been a feature of international activity. A cross‐case analysis is then used to identify issues for further research activity. In particular, the cross‐case analysis uses the existing constructs that have emerged from the general literature to explain divestment activity while highlighting the limitations of using these constructs within the retail sector. The paper concludes by noting the limitations of existing frameworks that seek to explain the internationalisation process without due consideration of the divestment process.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Barry Quinn and Anne Marie Doherty

Franchising is fast becoming one of the most popular entry mode strategies for international retail companies when moving into international markets. Academic research…

Abstract

Franchising is fast becoming one of the most popular entry mode strategies for international retail companies when moving into international markets. Academic research, however, has only recently begun to examine international franchising within the context of retailer internationalisation. A major gap in the literature is the nature of the international retail franchise relationship and, in particular, the mechanisms used to control and co‐ordinate the international franchise network. This paper reports the findings from an in‐depth, ethnographic study of the internationalisation activity of one retail franchise company and examines the extent to which the marketing channels and agency theory literatures can, in practice, explain power and control in international retail franchising.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 17 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Nicholas Alexander, Barry Quinn and Patricia Cairns

The research presented here initiates the process of the detailed analysis of international retail divestment activity through the identification of the volume of global…

Abstract

Purpose

The research presented here initiates the process of the detailed analysis of international retail divestment activity through the identification of the volume of global divestment activity and the characteristics of that activity during the timeframe of 1987‐2003.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology followed here is essentially historical in nature and draws on a wide range of contemporary periodicals, reports and other sources.

Findings

The paper reports findings on: the form and extent of divestment activity; the year of divestment; divestment by retail sub‐sector; divested chain size; length of time spent in the market of divestment; divestment by retail sub‐sector; and the market of origin of divesting retailer.

Originality/value

This paper provides an initial indication of the volume and nature of international retail divestment in the period considered. Such material has not been available previously. International retailing research has primarily focused on the internationalisation process rather than retail divestment from international markets. However, divestment from international markets is an issue of increasing importance within the competitive global environment. Previously research into retail divestment has focused on individual company experience. For the first time, the research presented here attempts to build a picture of the scale and dimensions of international retail withdrawal. The paper shows that patterns of international divestment are discernible.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

Mark Palmer and Barry Quinn

This paper aims to explore the nature of divestment within the context of retailer internationalisation.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the nature of divestment within the context of retailer internationalisation.

Design/methodology/approach

It focuses on the activities of the Dutch food multinational retailer Royal Ahold (Ahold). Drawing on 37 in‐depth interviews with investment banks and executives, this paper provides a number of insights into Ahold's international retail divestment activities within the context of a broadly successful international investment strategy.

Findings

It offers some new insights into the multidimensional nature of international retail divestment construct in terms of the operational as well as more subtle and less visible non‐operational international retail divestments. It is concluded from this study that, rather than portraying strategic and opportunistic approaches as binary opposites, a retail firm may have varying degrees of approaches to international retail divestment, and these may not necessarily be isomorphic across different countries.

Research limitations/implications

The paper explores international retail divestment from a rather broad perspective, although it is hoped that these parameters can be used to raise a new set of more detailed priorities for future research on international retail divestment.

Practical implications

This paper raises a number of interesting issues such as whether retailers initially take divestment seriously and the degree to which this is actually possible during market entry.

Originality/value

As called for in the literature, this study examines divestment in the broadest possible fashion, thus addressing a major gap in our understanding of the whole internationalisation process.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 January 2010

Patricia Cairns, Barry Quinn, Nicholas Alexander and Anne Marie Doherty

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role played by leadership in divestment decision making and indeed during the corporate restructuring phase for retail…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role played by leadership in divestment decision making and indeed during the corporate restructuring phase for retail organisations. In doing so, the paper aims to contribute to a growing body of research that seeks to develop understanding of the factors leading to retail divestment and the nature of corporate response to divestment.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case approach is utilised. The cases are selected from a database of international retail divestment activity over a longitudinal period.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that divestment can be a response to “failure”, however, support is also provided for the assertion that divestment can be a strategic decision to devote resources more efficiently elsewhere, either at home or abroad. A key finding is the role of leadership and managerial stability in relation to divestment and restructuring at home and abroad.

Research limitations/implications

The themes presented in this paper are developed from observational data. The validity of the themes should be examined further through in‐depth, qualitative case studies of divestment activity. Future research could examine the role of new CEOs both in relation to the divestment itself and during the process of restructuring following divestment.

Practical implications

The role of leadership and managerial stability in divestment and corporate restructuring processes are highlighted. Insights are provided into the organisational response to divestment actions and the implications for further international strategies.

Originality/value

Academic debate on divestment has highlighted a wide range of reasons that lead to retailers divesting international operations and the strategic value of divestment. This paper adds to existing knowledge by examining the role of leadership within the divestment process.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Barry Quinn

Provides an ethnographic study of the internationalization process of a UK natural‐based bodycare products operation which expanded rapidly through franchising – with 249…

Abstract

Provides an ethnographic study of the internationalization process of a UK natural‐based bodycare products operation which expanded rapidly through franchising – with 249 franchised outlets operating in 31 countries by 1995. Recounts the first overseas market entry in 1987 into Sweden, which happened almost accidentally. Reports that the economic recession in the late 1980s in the UK focused the company’s attention on expanding overseas. Notes that the company preferred potential franchisees to contact them, rather than the other way round. Finds that a successful franchise operating in one country often led to expansion in neighbouring countries. Indicates that expansion overseas was an ad hoc affair but, in fact, when interviewing top management, an expansion plan becomes discernible. Explains how the company improved its performance by putting in place a better support package for franchisees, by more aggressively attracting potential franchisees, and by motivating existing franchisees. Concludes that ethnographic studies are valuable to find out what happens in practice as opposed to in theory.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Karise Hutchinson and Barry Quinn

The purpose of this paper is to examine the internationalisation process of small, specialist retailers with the aim of identifying the key characteristics that define…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the internationalisation process of small, specialist retailers with the aim of identifying the key characteristics that define this specific category of international retailer.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative case studies of nine UK‐based small international retailers, coupled with interviews with government and consultancy organisations, form the empirical basis of the work.

Findings

Findings highlight five characteristics of small specialist international retailers: possession of a strong company brand image/identity with luxury/middle market appeal; niche strategy; dual strategy of expansion; ownership characteristics defined either by the founder or parent company; and vertical integration from manufacturing to retailing.

Practical implications

With the increasing internationalisation of retail operations, the specialist sector comprises a significant number of retailers operating in international markets or contemplating the move into the international marketplace. The findings of the current work highlight the key factors that characterise those small specialist firms that operate outside their domestic market.

Originality/value

The paper identifies the key characteristics that define a significant category of international retailer, hitherto unexplored in the literature.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 318