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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2020

Mostafa Hasan, Dewan Rahman, Grantley Taylor and Barry Oliver

The purpose of this paper is to examine the association between debt maturity structure and stock price crash risk in Australia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the association between debt maturity structure and stock price crash risk in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ panel data estimation with industry and year fixed effects. The paper uses a sample of 1,548 publicly listed Australian firms (8,661 firm-year observations) covering the 2000–2015 period.

Findings

Stock price crash risk is positively and significantly associated with the long-term debt maturity structure of firms. In addition, this positive association is more pronounced for firms with a more opaque information environment.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine stock price crash risk in Australia. The findings are value relevant as it uncovers how debt maturity structure affects shareholders' wealth protection.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Barry Wilkinson and Nick Oliver

The issues and dilemmas facing companies, theirunions and their workers as they attempt toemulate Japanese‐style production practices arediscussed. Using the case of Ford…

Abstract

The issues and dilemmas facing companies, their unions and their workers as they attempt to emulate Japanese‐style production practices are discussed. Using the case of Ford UK as an example, the causes and effects of the 1988 strike and the withdrawal from the proposed electronics plant at Dundee are explored. Major obstacles to the successful introduction of practices such as just‐in‐time production are identified; however, once implemented these practices carry significant implications for unions and workers.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

John R. Ogilvie and Mary L. Carsky

With the increased emphasis on emotions in negotiation, an exercise is presented which can be used with a simulated negotiation to develop emotional skills. Linking…

1530

Abstract

With the increased emphasis on emotions in negotiation, an exercise is presented which can be used with a simulated negotiation to develop emotional skills. Linking research on the role of emotions in negotiation to emotional intelligence, we propose a set of activities to develop greater awareness, understanding, and ability to manage emotions while negotiating. The teaching note explains how to use two worksheets, one before and one during the simulation. Headings on the worksheets correspond to levels of emotional intelligence. Suggestions for debriefing along with supporting literature are provided.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Courtney Shelton Hunt and Mary C. Kernan

This paper reports the results of two studies that examined the impact of framing negotiations in affective terms. Pursuant to the recommendations made by Clyman and Tripp…

1851

Abstract

This paper reports the results of two studies that examined the impact of framing negotiations in affective terms. Pursuant to the recommendations made by Clyman and Tripp (2000) for reducing risks associated with discrepant values, the objective of the first study was to determine the optimal way of representing potential outcomes in affective terms in a negotiation payoff table. Results demonstrated the superiority of happy and unhappy face icons over other representations; it also revealed a slight advantage to varying the quantity of icons, rather than size, to reflect differences in the relative values of these outcomes. In the second study, the focus was on determining to what extent, if any, framing negotiations in affective terms would differentially affect negotiators' thoughts and feelings prior to engaging in a two‐party negotiation. Results indicated that when negotiations are affectively framed, negotiators report higher levels of negotiation involvement and positive emotion and lower levels of trust, as well as a decreased likelihood of employing cooperative negotiation tactics. The implications of the findings for future research are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

336

Abstract

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Carlos Montes, Dámaso Rodríguez and Gonzalo Serrano

The purpose of this paper is to identify the affective factors underlying conflict behavior. Traditional conflict research assumes that when individuals face conflicts…

9685

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the affective factors underlying conflict behavior. Traditional conflict research assumes that when individuals face conflicts they follow a rational process, thus denying the role of emotion‐relevant variables.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 358 undergraduate students from the University of Santiago de Compostela were classified into four different affective groups (happy, inactive, sad, and surprised) based on their actual emotional experience and asked to complete ROCI‐II. ANOVA were conducted to test hypotheses.

Findings

Results reveal that affective groups statistically differ in their self‐reported conflict management styles. Positive moods and feelings have been found to be related to the preference for more cooperative strategies.

Research limitations/implications

This study is exploratory in nature and since hypotheses were only partly supported, future research should address this topic in depth.

Practical implications

It has been suggested that, in order to handle conflicts properly, individuals should take into account both their cognition and emotion.

Originality/value

This paper sheds light on current research in the prediction of conflict behavior by examining the impact of affect out from the lab.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Donald E. Conlon and Courtney Shelton Hunt

The present study extends recently‐acquired knowledge about the affective aspects of negotiations by examining the effects of defining negotiation outcomes in affective…

Abstract

The present study extends recently‐acquired knowledge about the affective aspects of negotiations by examining the effects of defining negotiation outcomes in affective terms rather than numeric terms. Using a 2 x 2 experimental design, the researchers represented the negotiation outcomes in four different ways: happy faces, unhappy faces, positive numbers, and negative numbers. The results indicate that representing outcomes in affective terms leads to longer negotiation times and higher impasse rates. In addition, participants whose outcomes were represented as happy faces reported the highest levels of emotional involvement, the lowest levels of cooperation and trust, and most frequently experienced negative emotions. Emotional involvement and negative emotions also helped explain differences in negotiation time and individual outcomes over and above the effects of the experimental manipulations. The implications of these results for negotiation research are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Barry Oliver, Blanca Pérez-Gladish and Paz Méndez-Rodríguez

The purpose of this paper is to identify whether the Spanish stock market experiences a negativity effect on the announcement of Spanish consumer sentiment information and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify whether the Spanish stock market experiences a negativity effect on the announcement of Spanish consumer sentiment information and if firms that are signatory to the UN Global Compact on corporate social responsibility are relatively more salient in the minds of investors.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use consumer sentiment announcements to show how the negativity effects on the Spanish stock market are significantly influenced by how salient the stock is in the minds of investors. If a firm’s stock exhibits negativity effects on the release of consumer sentiment information then this stock is salient to investors. If firms who are signatory to the UN Global Compact exhibit significant negativity effects, it could be concluded that these stocks are salient, particularly if firms that are not signatory to the Global Compact do not exhibit a similar negativity effect.

Findings

The IBEX35 index experiences significant negativity effects upon the release of Spanish consumer sentiment announcements. This is similar to that reported in other countries, notably Australia and the USA. Using the constituent firms in the IBEX35 index, the authors find that those firms that are signatory to the UN Global Compact are significantly more likely to experience negativity effects upon the release of Spanish consumer sentiment information than if they are not signatory to the Global Compact. This indicates that firms that are part of the UN Global Compact are more salient to investors.

Research limitations/implications

Available published Spanish data on consumer sentiment.

Practical implications

Little is understood of the impact that consumer sentiment announcements have on stock prices. Studies in USA and Australia have identified significant negativity effects in stock markets when consumer sentiment information is released. This research has found that a psychological negativity bias occurs in firms that are salient to investors. Salience has been found to be important in asset pricing.

Originality/value

This paper tries to find out which companies are more likely to sign the UN Global Compact. These companies are more sensitive to consumer sentiment, because they depend on the everyday decisions of the consumers. The more the companies depend on consumers, the more they care about them. And, when the consumer sentiment goes down, they are more affected by this sentiment. These firms are also more worried about the long term. They are not only thinking about the profits in the short term but also about maintaining the generation of profits in the long term.

Details

Review of Behavioral Finance, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1940-5979

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Andrea M. Bodtker and Jessica Katz Jameson

A growing body of research suggests that conflict can be beneficial for groups and organizations (e.g., De Dren & Van De Vliert, 1997). This paper articulates the argument…

3947

Abstract

A growing body of research suggests that conflict can be beneficial for groups and organizations (e.g., De Dren & Van De Vliert, 1997). This paper articulates the argument that to be in conflict is to be emotionally activated (Jones, 2000) and utilizes Galtung's (1996) triadic theory of conflict transformation to locate entry points for conflict generation. Application of these ideas is presented through exemplars that demonstrate the utility of addressing emotions directly in the management of organizational conflicts.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Jill M. Purdy, Pete Nye and P.V. (Sundar) Balakrishnan

Our need to understand the impact of communication media on negotiation is growing as technological advances offer negotiators more communication options. As access to…

3785

Abstract

Our need to understand the impact of communication media on negotiation is growing as technological advances offer negotiators more communication options. As access to technologies such as computer chat and videoconferencing increases, negotiators are choosing to use or to avoid these media without knowing the impact of their choices on negotiations. This research assesses objective and subjective negotiation outcomes, such as profit and outcome satisfaction, across four communication media with varying levels of media richness (face‐to‐face, videoconference, telephone, and computer‐mediated communication). A conceptual framework is offered to illustrate how media richness impacts objective and subjective outcomes. Results suggest that media richness affects required bargaining time, outcome satisfaction and the desire for future negotiation interaction. Thus, the communication media for negotiations should be chosen with care.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

1 – 10 of 590