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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Barry Lynch

Part 1 of this paper answered in the affirmative that the capital budgeting process for fixed assets can be improved (see Journal of Facilities Management, Volume One…

Abstract

Part 1 of this paper answered in the affirmative that the capital budgeting process for fixed assets can be improved (see Journal of Facilities Management, Volume One, Number One). In part 2 more than 20 improvement tactics are identified and explained. Tactics range from the simple (identifying assets that need to be written off) to the complex (tax segregation strategies). Some can be implemented by individuals (sensitivity analysis), while others (budgeting and planning software) impact all areas of an organisation. In addition to improvement tactics, a framework for improvement is outlined and potential benefits are identified.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Barry Lynch

Planning and implemating fixed asset capital projects that increase shareholder value is problematic because the process spans the entire enterprise and requires the…

Abstract

Planning and implemating fixed asset capital projects that increase shareholder value is problematic because the process spans the entire enterprise and requires the coordinated efforts of professionals in the areas of accounting, finance, real estate, facility management, tax, engineering and project management. In many respects the process is only as strong as its weakest link. Initiatives to improve the process must start with an understanding of capital budgeting, and require executive sponsorship and vision as well as a functioning capital budgeting system. This paper is the first of a two part series that provides an overview of the importance of capital budgeting and explains the four types of capital budgeting decisions that most executives face. Part II builds upon the basics covered in Part I and lists more than twenty improvement tactics that can be implemented by organisations and individuals.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Kathleen Seiders, Constantine Simonides and Douglas J. Tigert

Focuses on the impact of supercenters on traditional food retailers in four markets, including two small cities (Victoria, Texas; Gainesville, Georgia) and two large…

Abstract

Focuses on the impact of supercenters on traditional food retailers in four markets, including two small cities (Victoria, Texas; Gainesville, Georgia) and two large cities (Columbus, Ohio; Omaha, Nebraska). Consumer surveys were conducted in order to assess the effects of the entry of Meijer, Wal‐Mart, Kmart, and Target supercenters. The results show supercenters can gain from 15 to 20 percent of primary shoppers and an even greater proportion of secondary shoppers. Furthermore, the supercenter primary shoppers, and especially those of Wal‐Mart and Meijer, identified low price and assortment more often as the reason for store choice. In comparison, traditional supermarket primary shoppers were less willing to trade off locational convenience or, in some cases, quality and assortment. Wal‐Mart is predicted to continue to rapidly gain share at the expense of competitors who do not differentiate themselves in some significant way.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 28 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Catherine Murray-Rust

Library storage is traditionally viewed as a space management strategy, a way of dealing with overcrowded buildings and growing collections. Storage also is implicitly a…

Abstract

Library storage is traditionally viewed as a space management strategy, a way of dealing with overcrowded buildings and growing collections. Storage also is implicitly a preservation strategy: an alternative to weeding, cramming books tightly on shelves, stacking them on the floor, or not purchasing them in the first place. Among its obvious preservation benefits, storage provides security from theft and vandalism, and protection from spills and pests caused by increasingly prevalent food and drink in library buildings. Although transfer to storage may be risky for fragile materials, leaving them in stacks that are constantly being shifted is likely to be more damaging. Many storage facilities provide better environmental conditions for collections than old or poorly maintained modern library buildings.

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12-024627-4

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Book part
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Damian Tago, Henrik Andersson and Nicolas Treich

This study contributes to the understanding of the health effects of pesticides exposure and of how pesticides have been and should be regulated.

Abstract

Purpose

This study contributes to the understanding of the health effects of pesticides exposure and of how pesticides have been and should be regulated.

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents literature reviews for the period 2000–2013 on (i) the health effects of pesticides and on (ii) preference valuation of health risks related to pesticides, as well as a discussion of the role of benefit-cost analysis applied to pesticide regulatory measures.

Findings

This study indicates that the health literature has focused on individuals with direct exposure to pesticides, i.e. farmers, while the literature on preference valuation has focused on those with indirect exposure, i.e. consumers. The discussion highlights the need to clarify the rationale for regulating pesticides, the role of risk perceptions in benefit-cost analysis, and the importance of inter-disciplinary research in this area.

Originality/value

This study relates findings of different disciplines (health, economics, public policy) regarding pesticides, and identifies gaps for future research.

Details

Preference Measurement in Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-029-2

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Book part
Publication date: 26 March 2020

Abstract

Details

From Blofeld to Moneypenny: Gender in James Bond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-163-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and…

Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Barry O'Mahony

The purpose of this paper is to reveal insights into the relationship between migrant communities and the hospitality industry by examining the case study of Irish…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal insights into the relationship between migrant communities and the hospitality industry by examining the case study of Irish migrants into nineteenth century Victoria in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides examples of the pattern of engagement with the hospitality industry as well as individual and family stories that highlight how hotel‐keeping and the service of alcohol in Melbourne and regional Victoria in the mid‐to‐late 1800s, was a key element in social improvement and mobility of Irish migrants at that time.

Findings

Although the relationship between the English and the Irish in the nineteenth century could be classified as difficult, the tensions that characterised Anglo‐Irish relations in a European context were remarkably absent in colonial Australia. This paper describes how conditions in the colonies when the majority of Irish migrants arrived allowed them to use the hospitality industry to improve their social standing and to consolidate their position in Australian society.

Research limitations/implications

Migration presents an interesting interface between host communities and guest migrants, which go to the heart of hospitality. In addition, this case study suggests there are some interesting avenues to be followed by exploring cases of other migrant communities both in their relationships with hosts, but also in the opportunities offered by the hospitality industry for opportunities denied to migrants in wider community.

Practical implications

The opportunities offered to migrants in the hospitality industry can provide a useful means of engagement for migrants into host communities through employment, and more importantly through the cultural interface allowed through hospitality enterprises whereby the migrant as guest acts as host to host community members in hospitality entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

The paper has value to both practitioners and academics because it provides an example of migrant experiences and the opportunities presented by the hospitality industry for employment, entrepreneurship and ultimately community integration.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1984

Melvin B. Taub

Despite the blurring of many distinctions among financial institutions, there are, in fact, financial services “industries” and sub‐industries. And there are also…

Abstract

Despite the blurring of many distinctions among financial institutions, there are, in fact, financial services “industries” and sub‐industries. And there are also important differences in operation, culture, risks and rewards, and regulation.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2021

Pam Kappelides, Shane Barry, Eunjung Kim, Liz Fredline and Graham Cuskelly

This article assesses how the human management practices of recruitment, selection, orientation, training and recognition enacted by the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games…

Abstract

Purpose

This article assesses how the human management practices of recruitment, selection, orientation, training and recognition enacted by the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games impacted volunteers' experiences and their likelihood of volunteering in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data from 30 volunteers, involved in various stages (including selected and not selected) of the selection process for the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games, was collected through focus group interviews.

Findings

The findings offer important insights for mega sport event managers and their organisations around utilising a traditional human resource management approach for their volunteer workforce.

Originality/value

The findings of the study point to a number of important opportunities for mega event organisers: ensuring there is a personal and consistent approach for all volunteers (even volunteers who are not successful in the application), flexibility in the way volunteers are provided training and support (online, self-paced and tailored to specific roles) and ensuring that organising committees have a strong strategy and direction for host cities to engage in a volunteer legacy.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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