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Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Barry J. Babin and Kevin W. James

This chapter focuses on how retailers can do the right thing and be successful at the same time, particularly in the light of technological innovation. Service dominant…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on how retailers can do the right thing and be successful at the same time, particularly in the light of technological innovation. Service dominant logic (SDL), with the notion of operant and operand resources as a means to connect the retailer to the customer, provides a framework for the chapter. Normative decision making is presented as a necessary ethical and practical mindset to solve problems, and we illustrate the relationship between normative decision making and value. Value becomes the ultimate outcome to the customer that will allow for sustainable retailing into the future. Utilitarian value and hedonic value are presented and elaborated upon to show how companies and consumers come together to transform resources into value through service. Sections are included showing how value delivery will evolve into the future and what mix of value will be necessary so that retailing can see continued success.

Details

Food Retailing and Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-554-2

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2019

Weiling Zhuang, Barry J. Babin and Adilson Borges

The purpose of this study is to address the following research questions: How do customer input and service provider (in this study, the terms firm and service provider…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to address the following research questions: How do customer input and service provider (in this study, the terms firm and service provider are used interchangeably) input coproduce customer experience and response? Do different components of customer input influence customer experience differently?

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling (SEM) was adopted to conduct tests of the measurement model and the main hypotheses represented in Figure 1. LISREL 8.80 (Jöreskog and Sörbom, 1993) was applied for data analysis in the current study. A survey instrument was designed and used to gather data for use in this study. Data were collected using an online survey administration tool (www.qualtrics.com).

Findings

The results indicate that two dimensions of customer participation – information resource and codeveloper activities – demonstrate distinct impacts on customers’ responses. Specifically, customer participation (information resource) is negatively related to customer shopping values and satisfaction. However, another dimension of customer participation (codeveloper activities) is positively related to the same outcomes.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is among the first to integrate customer participation and customer orientation to understand the phenomenon of customer co-creation. The study applies for a two-dimensional customer input construct and empirically tests their impacts on customer experience. Both utilitarian value and hedonic value are included in the research framework to assess customer value experience.

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Nathalie Spielmann, Barry J. Babin and Caroline Verghote

This paper aims to propose a personality-based approach to measure Millennial consumers’ wine evaluations. Past personality-based measures (brand personality, country…

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1257

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a personality-based approach to measure Millennial consumers’ wine evaluations. Past personality-based measures (brand personality, country personality and product personality) each presents their own issues when it comes to measuring wine perceptions, especially those of neophyte wine consumers. This paper proposes a new, holistic and tailored measure to gauge the personality dimensions Millennials perceive in wine.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple studies were conducted in France. Items from former personality scales were combined and condensed. An exploratory factor analysis (n = 318) followed by a confirmatory factor analysis (n = 236) across wines from different regions were conducted. Predictive validity tests relating the dimensions of wine personality to key consumer outcomes were also conducted. Finally, face validity tests with real wines were conducted (n = 190).

Findings

The results suggest two dimensions of wine personality for Millennial consumers: a social and a philosophical dimension. The nine-trait structure is stable across origins and each dimension can be related to quality and value perceptions, attitudes and purchase intent. The findings suggest a new way for managers to gauge the way their wine offering is received by Millennial wine consumers.

Originality/value

The initial personality structure, uncovered across the multiple studies, suggests a parsimonious way to understand how an important wine segment, Millennials, perceives wines. The measure includes brand, product and origin perceptions and thus proposes a holistic way of understanding young consumers’ perception of wine personality.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Barry J. Babin and Christian Bushardt

This paper aims to provide insight into the three most prevalent expert wine rater sources and how they separately affect retail prices post-release across a sample of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide insight into the three most prevalent expert wine rater sources and how they separately affect retail prices post-release across a sample of French and US wines from the 2012 vintage.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical research using regression models built on data scraped from Web sources provides the source for the substance of the paper.

Findings

The findings suggest that all rating sources affect release price (approximately $3-4 per point), but more indicative of market performance, only Wine Advocate ratings significantly influence price change in the market post-release. Other results suggest some, but far from complete, consistency among raters. Red wines and French wines typically fetch better scores from the raters, and they are less subject to price drops in the marketplace.

Research limitations/implications

The nature of the data does not allow for consumers’ individual difference characteristics, such as wine knowledge, among others, to be included as potential factors explaining why and when expert ratings influence consumers.

Practical implications

Third-party wine ratings do indeed matter both in terms of release price and post-release price performance. In particular, following release, Wine Advocate ratings provide the most influential quality signal in the marketplace.

Social implications

Scrutiny on the manner in which ratings information is used by retailers is appropriate, given the influence such ratings have on consumers as demonstrated by their effects on market behaviors.

Originality/value

The research examines the top three US expert ratings and considers their consistency and impact, not just on release price but also on price following release, as a direct indicator of product performance in the marketplace.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Barry J. Babin and Julie Guidry Moulard

The purpose of this paper is to consider various strengths and weaknesses of the academic review process with an emphasis on the effect the process has on the relevance of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider various strengths and weaknesses of the academic review process with an emphasis on the effect the process has on the relevance of business journals, particularly in the marketing literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors not only highlight some of the literature addressing the review process but also present insight and opinion largely based on decades of experience editing, reviewing, writing and publishing.

Findings

Reviewers can help develop research papers, but reviewers remain gatekeepers who, theoretically, protect journals from publishing research that would diminish the truthful body of knowledge within a field. However, many inefficiencies, some of which involve volition, allow one to question whether the review process as we know it best accomplishes that purpose.

Practical implications

Recognizing that reviewers affect journal prestige, the paper concludes with a number of ideas for improving the gate-keeping and developmental functions for academic articles.

Social implications

Society should extract value from what appears in publicly circulated, academic, refereed journals. However, to the extent that the publication process interferes with objective dissemination of knowledge, that value is diminished and perhaps even absent.

Originality/value

The paper intends to stimulate frank conversation about the Academy’s refereed publication process and factors that tend to interfere with its function.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Johan Bruwer and Barry J. Babin

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146

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Barry J. Babin, Yong‐Ki Lee, Eun‐Ju Kim and Mitch Griffin

The research seeks to extend the notions of utilitarian and hedonic value to account for outcomes of consumer service encounters.

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18103

Abstract

Purpose

The research seeks to extend the notions of utilitarian and hedonic value to account for outcomes of consumer service encounters.

Design/methodology/approach

The research question is examined using a sample of Korean restaurant consumers who used a structured questionnaire to evaluate their dining experience. Structural equations analysis is used to test various research hypotheses and examine the extent to which consumer service value mediates the effect of the environment on customer satisfaction and future intentions.

Findings

Key findings include the ability of the consumer service value scale to account for utilitarian and hedonic value, the role of functional and affective service environment components in shaping consumer satisfaction and future patronage intentions and the relative diagnosticity of positive affect.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need to extend the results to a diverse range of cultures.

Practical implications

Restaurant managers should place increased emphasis on the physical environment as it clearly plays a role in creating positive consumer outcomes and building strong customer relationships.

Originality/value

The use of the consumer value scale (CSV) – particularly in a novel service context.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Yam B. Limbu, C. Jayachandran, Barry J. Babin and Robin T. Peterson

Previous studies that examined the role of empathy and nonverbal immediacy on business-to-business (B2B) salesperson performance is limited in scope and yielded…

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2420

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies that examined the role of empathy and nonverbal immediacy on business-to-business (B2B) salesperson performance is limited in scope and yielded inconclusive evidence. Grounded in Plank and Greene’s (1996) framework of salesperson effectiveness, this paper aims to empirically investigate the mediating role of adaptive selling behavior through which empathy and nonverbal immediacy influence sales force performance and the form of empathy (cognitive or affective) that has the most beneficial role in improving relationship (versus outcome) salesperson performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Using cross-sectional data that were collected from 422 pharmaceutical sales representatives, this study used structural equation modeling to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

Adaptive selling behavior mediates the effect of perspective taking empathy and empathic concern on relationship performance. However, the impact of empathy on outcome performance is not significant through adaptive selling behavior, but perspective taking empathy has a direct influence on outcome performance. Contrary to expectations, nonverbal immediacy is not mediated by adaptive selling behavior but has a direct and positive impact on relationship performance.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study have several implications for recruitment, training and assessment of salespeople in a B2B context. Based on the empirical evidence, it is highlighted that firms may use different forms of empathy and nonverbal cues to promote adaptive selling behavior that impact sales force performance (i.e. outcome or relationship).

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study which simultaneously examines the mediating role of adaptive selling behavior in the relationship between three antecedent variables that relate to sales force empathy and nonverbal communication (i.e. perspective taking empathy, empathic concern and nonverbal immediacy) and two aspects of B2B sales performance (relationship and outcome).

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Siddik Bozkurt, David Marius Gligor and Barry J. Babin

The purpose of this study is to examine how customers’ perceptions of brands’ social media interactivity impact customer engagement behaviors (CEBs) (e.g. customer…

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1223

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how customers’ perceptions of brands’ social media interactivity impact customer engagement behaviors (CEBs) (e.g. customer purchases, referrals, influence and knowledge) while accounting for the moderating role of brand type and social media platform.

Design/methodology/approach

Two separate online surveys (Study 1 (N1) = 341, Study 2 (N2) = 183) were conducted to measure the constructs of interest. Regression analyzes tests research hypotheses; PROCESS Model 1 was used to test the moderating roles of brand type and platform. Further, the pick-a-point approach (i.e. spotlight analysis) was used to probe the interaction terms.

Findings

The results indicate that when customers perceive a brand to be highly interactive on social media (vs inactive), they are more willing to buy brand offerings, refer the brand in exchange for monetary incentives, inform their family and friends about the brand on social media and provide feedback and suggestions for improving the brand. Furthermore, the positive impact of perceived social media interactivity on customer purchases, referrals, influence and knowledge varies across brand and social media platform types.

Research limitations/implications

Online surveys using convenience samples were conducted to assess the constructs of interest. Archival data may provide an avenue for further insight. Future research may be able to track actual online customer behavior using such data. Further, researchers are encouraged to corroborate the results found here over time as the winds of social media shift to new platforms.

Practical implications

The results suggest that interacting on social media encourages customers to contribute to brand value directly (through purchasing) and/or indirectly (through referring, influencing and suggesting). While all brands may leverage social media activity for success, the positive impact of perceived social media interactivity on CEBs is particularly impactful for non-global 500 brands. The results also indicate that customers are more willing to add value to the brand through purchases and suggestions when they perceive the brand to be highly interactive on both social media networking sites and the brand’s website. However, they are more willing to promote this brand and influence their social networks about it only when they perceive the brand to be highly (vs less) interactive on its own website.

Originality/value

This study examines the novel issue of the impact of perceived social media interactivity on different CEBs while accounting for the moderating role of the brand and platform used by customers. The results provide value in better understanding the levers through which social media affects performance.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Stephen Charters, Nathalie Spielmann and Barry J. Babin

The aim of this paper is to consider place as a value proposition, in the context of Resource-Advantage Theory, by analysing the concept of terroir, including its…

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1606

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to consider place as a value proposition, in the context of Resource-Advantage Theory, by analysing the concept of terroir, including its antecedents and consequences.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conceptually analyse the role of place in marketing by contrasting terroir to three other approaches: “in the style of […]”; “made in […]” and Protected Designations of Origin. They explore the impact of terroir on a range of products, offering a series of terroir value propositions.

Findings

Versus other place links, terroir offers a more specific Resource-Advantage, operating at environmental, philosophical and commercial levels. It offers a unique form of value to both consumers (e.g. identity, authenticity, cultural rootedness) and producers (e.g. irreproducibility, potential legal protection).

Research limitations/implications

Propositions address the antecedents and consequences of the terroir designation, the impact of consumer engagement, perceived authenticity and the added value offered to other regional goods. Additionally, how terroir may form a barrier to market entry, the relationship it has with the territorial brand, whether it offers greater product longevity and how it can be used as leverage for other related place-based brands and tourism are examined.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to address terroir as a marketing concept and to situate it within other forms of place marketing. It provides a definition, outlines the ways in which terroir creates value and provides a research agenda for future engagement with the concept.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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