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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Jon D. Wisman

In the history of economic thought, a number of heterodox economic thinkers have focused upon the manner in which economic doctrines are built upon an essentially…

Abstract

In the history of economic thought, a number of heterodox economic thinkers have focused upon the manner in which economic doctrines are built upon an essentially unexamined vision of social reality. Karl Marx referred to this vision as an ideology generated in the interest of the ruling class. Thorstein Veblen saw it as a complex of preconceptions reflecting prevailing beliefs. Joseph Schumpeter saw these visions as providing the “raw material for the analytic effort” of economists. [Schumpeter, 1954:42] In all three instances the vision was understood as a complex of assumptions concerning social reality that economists accept uncritically, if not unconsciously, and upon which the science of economics is constructed.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1973

D.M.C. Jones

Accounting information is prepared and submitted to interested parties with the aim of influencing their behaviour and decisions. If an accounting system is to provide…

Abstract

Accounting information is prepared and submitted to interested parties with the aim of influencing their behaviour and decisions. If an accounting system is to provide information which can be used to help interested parties, such as managers, to control the future activities of the organisation and make well‐informed decisions, the system should record in money terms every financial or economic fact which affects the income or financial position of the organisation. The functions of management can be described briefly as forecasting, planning, organising, co‐ordinating and controlling the use of resources with a view to achieving the stated objectives of an undertaking. The resources available to management include physical resources such as plant and machinery, financial resources, patents, trade marks, the reputation the company has with customers and creditors, and the human resources within the organisation. To the extent that an accounting system fails to record and present relevant information on any of these resources it can be regarded as inadequate as a source of information for control and decision‐making.

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Management Decision, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1989

Roman A. Ohrenstein and Barry Gordon

Of any group of ancient or medieval thinkers it is the Talmudic writers who came closest to the thought world of the modern human capital theorists. The only other group…

Abstract

Of any group of ancient or medieval thinkers it is the Talmudic writers who came closest to the thought world of the modern human capital theorists. The only other group which might be considered in this regard is the one comprising the jurists of ancient Rome. However, the insights of the jurists were confined to the context of discussion of damages with respect to sales of slave capital. The rabbis, by contrast, ranged beyond the question of damages. Furthermore, they employed human capital concepts in the examination of issues relating to free persons as well as slaves. There were three main points of departure for Talmudic debate in the field of human capital analysis. One of these was the biblical account, in the book of Exodus, of the construction of the Tabernacle. Another was the problem of estimation of appropriate compensation in cases of physical and psychological injury. A third involved attempts at the valuation of human life, which were evoked by the section of the book of Leviticus which deals with the dedication of persons to the sanctuary.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

James H. Dulebohn, Brian Murray and Gerald R. Ferris

Interest in the nature of influence attempts in the performance evaluation process has increased in recent years. Researchers have conducted a number of important and…

Abstract

Interest in the nature of influence attempts in the performance evaluation process has increased in recent years. Researchers have conducted a number of important and revealing cross‐sectional investigations, but there remains virtually no longitudinal work in this area. The present study attempted to address this need by conducting a multi‐period investigation of influence tactics use and affect that addressed three questions: (1) Are individuals consistent in their use of influence tactics across evaluation periods? (2) Are prior‐period performance ratings reflected in subsequent influence tactic use? (3) What role does affect, both supervisor and subordinate, play in this process? A latent variable structural model was tested using longitudinal data from managers and employees of food services units. Our results indicated that there is a cycle of continued influence tactic use across time periods, performance ratings help to determine subsequent tactic use, and both supervisor and subordinate affect play a role in the influence‐evaluation process. Implications of these results and directions for future research are discussed.

Details

Organizational Analysis, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1551-7470

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1991

Roman A. Ohrenstein and Barry Gordon

In any environment which allows for individual and groupenterprise, some degree of risk as well as elements of uncertainty andexpectation will be features of virtually…

Abstract

In any environment which allows for individual and group enterprise, some degree of risk as well as elements of uncertainty and expectation will be features of virtually every human endeavour. These three decision‐making categories are especially relevant where business enterprise is concerned. In modern economics those concepts have been subject to rigorous theoretical scrutiny as well as empirical investigation of their incidence and relevance in economic life. Analysis of risk, uncertainty and expectations is also a feature of Talmudic literature; this is explored in the light of modern economics. First, the Talmudic scholars showed considerable sophistication regarding the “risk” factor, called Zeyoona, as it is interrelated with the business phenomena of “profit” and “loss”. Second, their analysis of “uncertainty” displays an amazing degree of modernity in their approach to computation of uncertainties as well as in the methodology. Finally, there are points of contact between rational expectations theory and certain Talmudic emphasis in dealing with economic behaviour: management of the future through rational forecasting and awareness of the role of information in the formation of expectations.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 18 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

Roman A. Ohrenstein and Barry Gordon

Since the 1960s, the concept of “human capital” has become an increasingly familiar idea for modern economists. Analysis related to this concept has had significant…

Abstract

Since the 1960s, the concept of “human capital” has become an increasingly familiar idea for modern economists. Analysis related to this concept has had significant applications with respect to issues concerning the supply of labour and its remuneration. The applications have also gone further afield within contemporary thought[l].

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 14 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

John Hollis

Examines a re‐engineering programme undertaken by Littlewoods Stores Ltd in an attempt to improve the company’s image and financial results. Describes the problems faced…

749

Abstract

Examines a re‐engineering programme undertaken by Littlewoods Stores Ltd in an attempt to improve the company’s image and financial results. Describes the problems faced by the organization and the measures taken to improve the situation: key strategies were identified and senior staff were designated specific tasks. Outlines the key points in the process; the re‐engineering of the supply chain, the involvement of all staff and the two‐way communication system and openness of management.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

John Hollis

Examines a re‐engineering programme undertaken by Littlewoods chain stores in an attempt to improve the company’s image and financial results. Describes the problems faced…

2366

Abstract

Examines a re‐engineering programme undertaken by Littlewoods chain stores in an attempt to improve the company’s image and financial results. Describes the problems faced by the organization and the measures taken to improve the situation: key strategies were identified and senior staff were designated specific tasks. Outlines the key points in the process; the re‐engineering of the supply chain, the involvement of all staff and the two‐way communication system and openness of management.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2010

Andrew Penaluna, Jackie Coates and Kathryn Penaluna

Enabling entrepreneurial creativity is a key aim of UK Government; however, there is a dearth of constructively aligned models of teaching and assessment. This paper aims…

1578

Abstract

Purpose

Enabling entrepreneurial creativity is a key aim of UK Government; however, there is a dearth of constructively aligned models of teaching and assessment. This paper aims to introduce design‐based pedagogies and to highlight cognitive approaches that develop innovative mindsets; it seeks to indicate their propensity for adoption in entrepreneurship education.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review plus empirical evidence from pedagogical approaches developed through the extended collaboration of specialists in creative design, financial management and brain‐related occupational therapy inform this paper.

Findings

Neuroimaging studies challenge the thesis that learning for creative output is entirely algorithmic; diverse ideas occur when the brain's right cortex has opportunity to bring its findings to the fore, usually via “relaxed cognition”. Design‐based entrepreneurship pedagogies embed these concepts.

Research limitations/implications

The paper offers initial insights into how these understandings can be applied in transdisciplinary entrepreneurship‐education contexts.

Practical implications

Predicable assessment outcomes equal predictable students; which needs more working practices, behaviours and cultural environments that encourage innovation. Any educational environment that excludes these understandings is inherently flawed.

Social implications

The case study/project “Free time is thinking time” implies that traditional 9‐5 working practices are inappropriate for creative mindsets.

Originality/value

This paper links emerging bodies of evidence; it provides a first response to calls for a more creative enterprise curriculum and offers constructively aligned assessment.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 52 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 December 2009

Kanta Kumar, Deva Situnayake, Paul Bacon and Karim Raza

Rheumatoid arthritis is a common chronic disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. As with all chronic conditions, active participation by the patient…

118

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis is a common chronic disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. As with all chronic conditions, active participation by the patient, in areas ranging from accepting the diagnosis and its treatment to the implementation of coping strategies, is essential for effective management. Involving any patients in these process can be difficult; however patients of South Asian origin can present particular challenges. Many patients of South Asian origin have beliefs about disease causation and the utility of pharmacological and non‐pharmacological treatments that differ from those held by other patients. Communication difficulties can make it difficult for health care professionals to address these issues. We discuss strategies to support patients and encourage their involvement including linguistically appropriate educational material, peer support and telephone helplines.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

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