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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

Dianne Dean

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the application of taxation legislation to a mythical character.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the application of taxation legislation to a mythical character.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of humorous fiction.

Findings

The paper suggests that different understanding of concepts can produce unexpected results.

Research limitations/implications

Taxation legislation is difficult to apply to mythical characters.

Originality/value

The paper is a humorous story designed for Christmas reading.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2004

Barry Down

The state of citizenship education in Australia continues to attract media attention as evidenced by two recent newspaper headlines, Students take apathetic view of…

Abstract

The state of citizenship education in Australia continues to attract media attention as evidenced by two recent newspaper headlines, Students take apathetic view of democracy and Teach young about democracy. These headlines were reporting on the latest findings of the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) on school students understanding of democracy. As a part of a 28‐nation civics survey, the ACER found half of Australian students had no grasp of democracy (ranking them behind countries like Poland, Cyprus and the Slovak Republic); lacked clarity about the Constitution, elections, voting systems or the role of groups like trade unions; were unwilling to engage in politics; and believed politics was relatively unimportant

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2007

Vicki Macknight

Barry Down describes curriculum design in much the same way when he claims that in the years following World War Two Australian civics education was planned under…

Abstract

Barry Down describes curriculum design in much the same way when he claims that in the years following World War Two Australian civics education was planned under ‘perpetual tension and conflict between the imperatives of capitalism and democracy’. The suggestion seems to be that an ideal democratic education is possible, if short‐term political and economic considerations had not prevented this. I argue that this suggestion is naive. The democratic idea is not static ‘short term prudential requirements of the moment’, whether concerned with war, imperialism, fear of communism, industrial development, or otherwise, create the conditions by which democratic society is defined. This definition is embedded in civics education with the hope that children might perfect that society in adulthood. But visions of the ideal society do not only concern civics education, lessons on right behaviour. Rather, the very world children are educated to see depends on the politics and economics at the time that curriculum is designed. The content of lessons, the way the lessons are taught, and the underlying assumptions about what the world is like ‐ all are constituted by politics. Therefore, to understand civics education it is important to delve deeper and locate the epistemological basis of social studies education in the political context of its time. What children are taught about the social world as a whole should be considered before civics education can make any sense. To make this argument I look at the two curricula used at Victorian primary schools in the mid twentieth century, put in place in 1934 and 1952

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Paul Waddington and Barry Downs

This article begins with a case study of the Sandwell Telecare Project, an innovatory venture to pioneer the introduction of electronic aids to enable vulnerable people to…

Abstract

This article begins with a case study of the Sandwell Telecare Project, an innovatory venture to pioneer the introduction of electronic aids to enable vulnerable people to live independently. The article concludes with an account of the evaluation, which was undertaken by an independent consultant.The publication of this article is particularly timely in view of the Department of Health's expressed intention to make a substantial national investment in assistive technology such as the Sandwell Telecare Project for the two years from 2006. The investment will be known as the Preventative Technology Grant.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

Ali Al‐Kazemi and Gary Zajac

This article re‐examines the theoretical foundation of self‐directed teamwork theory in light of current developments in organizational America, and suggests propositions…

Abstract

This article re‐examines the theoretical foundation of self‐directed teamwork theory in light of current developments in organizational America, and suggests propositions about the relationship between teamwork and organizational policies such as downsizing. Teamwork is the exercise of creativity and autonomy by employees in pursuit of organizational goals. Effective teamwork requires a sense of trust and inclusion on the part of these employees. Organizational practices such as downsizing and contingent labor can erode this trust. If organizations wish to avoid undermining the financial, productivity and morale gains of teamwork, while observing their broader social responsibilities, they should reconsider their reliance upon downsizing and contingent workforces as a quick and dirty means of achieving cost savings.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

ROBERT G. TOMPKINS

The depth and breadth of the market for contingent claims, including exotic options, has expanded dramatically. Regulators have expressed concern regarding the risks of…

Abstract

The depth and breadth of the market for contingent claims, including exotic options, has expanded dramatically. Regulators have expressed concern regarding the risks of exotics to the financial system, due to the difficulty of hedging these instruments. Recent literature focuses on the difficulties in hedging exotic options, e.g., liquidity risk and other violations of the standard Black‐Scholes model. This article provides insight into hedging problems associated with exotic options: 1) hedging in discrete versus continuous time, 2) transaction costs, 3) stochastic volatility, and 4) non‐constant correlation. The author applies simulation analysis of these problems to a variety of exotics, including Asian options, barrier options, look‐back options, and quanto options.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2019

Gustaf Kastberg and Cristian Lagström

The problematization indicates the need for enhancing the understanding of hybrid settings as potentially dynamic, changing and fragile. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The problematization indicates the need for enhancing the understanding of hybrid settings as potentially dynamic, changing and fragile. The purpose of this paper is to generate the knowledge through a conceptualization of the relationship between hybrid organizing and object, helping us understand how and why hybridization takes place or de-hybridizing occurs.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a longitudinal qualitative case study of an attempt to introduce cost-benefit calculations as a management initiative in the social sector. In total, 18 observations of meetings and 48 interviews were done.

Findings

The main contribution is the empirically detailed description of how hybridizing must be understood in connection to a complex task at hand. A core observation is how complexity is escaped by either an intensive framing or compartmentalization – the former either leading to a disciplined hybrid allowing efficient action or to a hot and contested situation characterized by inertia. The latter, compartmentalization, presupposes less complexity with the potential of full de-hybridization into single-purpose organizing, failing to deal with the complex task at hand.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation is the one case approach and further research could focus on other settings.

Practical implications

The paper provides concepts useful for analysis of specific cooperative arrangements.

Social implications

The authors believe that the findings can bring useful insights to professionals, policy makers and others who are engaging in and addressing complex societal issues, not least within the public sector, a matter all too often overlooked by the accounting research community.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper is the focus on the organization and control in relation to the task at hand.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

In their daily practice, criminal justice professionals tell stories about their ‘clientele’ and these narratives legitimise their roles and decision-making. My research…

Abstract

In their daily practice, criminal justice professionals tell stories about their ‘clientele’ and these narratives legitimise their roles and decision-making. My research underscores how narratives of crime inform the practice of youth justice. The research presented in this chapter is based on court case file analysis and interviews with youth justice practitioners, concentrating on how they ‘theorise’ the causes of crime of migrant youth and which interventions they deem appropriate.

The chapter raises a methodological discussion on whether narrative researchers can and should attempt to actively question research participants' accounts, which constitute (penal) harm, introducing an interviewing model that I call ‘light’ Socratic dialogues. The aim of this interviewing style is to gradually move the narrator from doxa (‘common’ knowledge and practice) to episteme and to actively question research participants' accounts. ‘Socrates light’ that I propose in this chapter draws on two bodies of methodological literature. On the one hand, I integrate some principles from ‘active’ interviewing styles, often used in ‘researching up’. On the other hand, I draw on feminist methodology, which offers important insights on how to counterbalance the confronting aspects of ‘active’ interviewing.

The chapter reflects on some of my research interactions and discusses the rationale and the implications of the proposed mode of interviewing. I make three points: first, extensively documenting the interview context and interactions helps us to reflect on the (shifting) narrative performance of those involved in research. Second, becoming ‘active’ as researchers during the interview can enhance the analysis. Third, narrative studies can potentially be transformative if we question the narratives.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Narrative Criminology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-006-6

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Howard Falk

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Tito Conti

In an independent view of the evolution of ISO 9000 and the quality award models, Tito Conti, one of the chief architects of the European model for business excellence…

Abstract

In an independent view of the evolution of ISO 9000 and the quality award models, Tito Conti, one of the chief architects of the European model for business excellence, warns of the the dangers of a developing hegemony.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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