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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Muhammad Basir, Samnan Ali and Stephen R. Gulliver

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has had global repercussions on use of e-learning solutions. In order to maximise the promise of e-learning, it is necessary for…

Abstract

Purpose

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has had global repercussions on use of e-learning solutions. In order to maximise the promise of e-learning, it is necessary for managers to understand, control and avoid barriers that impact learner continuance of e-learning systems. The technology, individual, pedagogy and enabling conditions (TIPEC) framework identified theoretical barriers to e-learning implementation, i.e. grouped into four theoretical concepts (7 technology, 26 individual, 28 pedagogy and 7 enabling conditions). This study validates the 26 theoretical individual barriers. Appreciating individual barriers will help the e-learning implementation team to better scope system requirements and help achieve better student engagement, continuation and ultimately success.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 344 e-learning students and corporate trainees, across a range of degree programs. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis was used to define and validate barrier themes. Comparison of results against the findings of Ali et al. (2018) allows comparison of theoretical and validated compound factors.

Findings

Results of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis combined several factors and defined 16 significant categories of barriers instead of the 26 mentioned in the TIPEC framework.

Originality/value

Individual learner barriers, unlike technology and pedagogy barriers which can be directly identified and managed, appear abstract and unmanageable. This paper, considering implementation from the learner perspective, not only suggests a more simplified ontology of individual barriers but presents empirically validated questionnaire items (see Appendix) that can be used by implementation managers and practitioners as an instrument to highlight the barriers that impact individuals using e-learning factors. Awareness of individual barriers can help the content provider to adapt system design and/or use conditions to maximize the benefits of e-learning users.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 29 September 2020

Kirsti Melesk

While women in most European societies still carry the largest burden in caring for the family, there is also an important unrealised learning interest among women. This…

Abstract

Purpose

While women in most European societies still carry the largest burden in caring for the family, there is also an important unrealised learning interest among women. This has an impact on women's labour market and career opportunities. This paper aims at analysing empirically the role of family obligations in women's ability to realise their learning interests and how this differs across societal and institutional contexts across Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper makes use of the second wave of Adult Education Survey from 2011, including data from 22 European countries. The article focuses on women aged 25–55 – an age group most affected by parental obligations. Logistic regression models are used to compare the effect that children in the household have on women's learning barriers across country groups of different family policy arrangements.

Findings

The results confirm empirically the situational nature of family barriers to learning as they grow and decline depending on the age of children. However, the level of intensity and the period when family-related barriers remain relevant for women vary across European countries.

Originality/value

This paper provides new insights into how women's caring obligations shape their labour market and career opportunities, focussing on the ability to take up adult learning. Involving data from 22 countries, including Eastern European countries, provides a broad look into the differing contexts shaping women's opportunities across Europe.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 41 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Samnan Ali, M. Amaad Uppal and Stephen R. Gulliver

E-learning has gained much focus from educators and researchers, with many extolling e-learning over traditional learning. Despite this focus, implementation of e-learning

Abstract

Purpose

E-learning has gained much focus from educators and researchers, with many extolling e-learning over traditional learning. Despite this focus, implementation of e-learning systems often fails. The purpose of this paper is to consider a range of barriers, impacting the success of e-learning implementations, yet to the best of the authors’ knowledge no conceptual framework is able to consolidate existing research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper undertook an in-depth review of literature concerning e-learning implementation barriers. Papers were extracted from established peer-reviewed journals and open sources. Articles not related to e-learning implementation barriers were discarded. A total of 259 papers were identified, published between 1990 and 2016. Hermeneutics and data-driven qualitative content analysis was used to define 68 unique barriers.

Findings

The 68 unique barriers were thematically grouped into four conceptual categories, i.e. Technology (T), Individual (I), Pedagogy (P), and Enabling Conditions (EC). These four categories led to the conceptualization of “TIPEC” framework, which highlights the key concepts hindering e-learning implementation and delivery. Results show that most articles only consider a narrow range of success barriers.

Practical implications

The proposed TIPEC framework acts as a guide for education practitioners, system developers, policy makers, and researchers. It provides stakeholders with a summary of e-learning barriers.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need for a conceptual framework that consolidates all current research related to e-learning implementation barriers.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Martin McCracken

To contribute to the literature on managerial learning and illustrate the most important barriers to participation in learning for mid‐career managers. To provide…

Abstract

Purpose

To contribute to the literature on managerial learning and illustrate the most important barriers to participation in learning for mid‐career managers. To provide recommendations on how to eliminate such barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

From a larger sample of 61 managers, 22 were selected for further in‐depth analysis of their interview transcripts, due to the severity of barriers experienced. Using a grounded theory approach, they were categorised according to whether they had intrinsic (perceptual, emotional, motivational, cognitive) or extrinsic (organisational culture, management development culture or physical pressures) barriers to learning.

Findings

Three distinct groupings emerged when the managers were plotted on a chart according to the barriers experienced. Solutions were then proposed for eliminating barriers for each group of managers. The most important recommendations were that the support of top management was necessary to encourage continued development and that line managers had a critical role to play in developing tailored development packages.

Research limitations/implications

For future research, it would be useful to test whether or not these findings could be replicated across other sectors and managerial types. It is suggested that widening the sample would also be beneficial to eliminate issues inherent with a small population.

Practical implications

Leadership programmes for managers, focussing on understanding motivation at the individual level. In addition, top management should be involved in the evaluation of training and development so that they can lead their managerial teams effectively.

Originality/value

This paper is original in that it focuses on managers with severe barriers to learning and offers practical advice on what organisations should do in relation to these issues.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Junaidah Hashim

The purpose of this study is to identify learning barriers in information communication technology (ICT) adoption among working women in Malaysia. Regardless of gender, it…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify learning barriers in information communication technology (ICT) adoption among working women in Malaysia. Regardless of gender, it would be advantageous for all individuals in today's society to acquire basic ICT skills. Despite significant growth in ICT professionals during the last two decades, there remains a gender imbalance, particularly in developing countries such as Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a self‐developed questionnaire to measure the learning barriers and ICT adoption. The survey instrument was developed from the constructs used in the individual innovativeness theory and theory of perceived attributes. The questionnaires were administered face‐to‐face to a total of 315 working women, who participated as respondents in this study.

Findings

The findings revealed that the working women in Malaysia possess only average level of ICT skills. They seldom use the internet and e‐mail at their workplace or at home, they do not face serious learning barriers with respect to ICT, and they have complexity as their innovation characteristics. However, they are innovators in the adopters' categories. The combined variance in the characteristics of learning barriers, ICT skills, and ICT usage amounted to 70 per cent in innovation characteristics.

Practical implications

This study reduces the knowledge gap regarding the identification of learning barriers, ICT skills, and ICT usage as predictors of ICT adoption among working women in Malaysia. These factors have been overlooked by some previous researchers. This study also calls attention to the fact that employers and training agencies that are responsible to provide ICT training to women employees must understand and employ the proper learning approaches and methods that ought to be used in adult training and education. Malaysian women are able to adopt an innovation with a high degree of uncertainty at the time of adoption, and it is believed that with correct and suitable training schemes Malaysian working women can acquire appropriate ICT skills and become competent in using ICT at the workplace. With managerial skills and ICT‐based competencies, the working women would have a lot more knowledge seeking skills, increased access to up‐to‐date information, be effective in decision making, and establish networking and linkages. With this they will stand a better chance for promotion and advancement.

Originality/value

The sample of this study is unique. This study was conducted in a multi‐ethnic, multi‐cultural and multi‐lingual society. Malaysia presents an interesting case study on working women because it is a society undergoing rapid changes from its strong traditional religious and cultural norms to modern values about women.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2014

Morteza Shokri-Ghasabeh and Nicholas Chileshe

A research study has been undertaken at the University of South Australia to introduce application of lessons learned process in construction contractors ' bidding…

Abstract

Purpose

A research study has been undertaken at the University of South Australia to introduce application of lessons learned process in construction contractors ' bidding process in the context of knowledge management. The study aims to identify barriers to effectively capture lessons learned in Australian construction industry and how knowledge management can benefit from lessons learned application.

Design/methodology/approach

The research study has been undertaken through conducting a “methodological triangulation” and “interdisciplinary triangulation”. This involved an extensive literature review of knowledge management, organisation learning, lessons learned and associated processes and administration of a questionnaire to a sample of construction contractors operating in Australia to elicit opinions on the main barriers to capturing lessons learned, practices such as existence and retention of documentation procedures. A total of 81 useable responses were received from 450 organisations. Response data were subjected to descriptive and inferential statistics with correlation analysis to examine the strength of relationship among the barriers.

Findings

The top-3 barriers to the effective capturing of lessons learned were “lack of employee time”, “lack of resources” and “lack of clear guidelines”, whereas, “lack of management support” was the least ranked barrier. The study established that despite the majority of the ACCs having formal procedures for recording the tenders submitted and their outcomes, only a minority actually retained the lessons learned documentation for each project. The larger contractors were found to be more aware of the importance of lessons learned documentation. A comparative analysis with previous studies also found a disparity in the ranking of the barriers.

Research limitations/implications

The majority of the participants were small construction contractors in Australia. The reason is that the researchers were not aware of the contractors ' size prior to inviting them for participation in the research study. Second the findings may not generalize to other industries or to organisations operating in other countries.

Originality/value

The findings of this survey help ACCs to understand the importance of lessons learned documentation as part of lessons learned implementation and identify the barriers to effectively document their lessons learned. The study provides insights on the barriers and proposes advocated solutions in form of drivers and enablers (critical success factors) of organisational learning capturing among the Australian construction contractors. By reviewing the current literature, “post-project reviews” and “lessons learned” as important elements of organisation learning knowledge transfer, are addressed. Finally, contribution of this study to knowledge and practice has been discussed in this paper.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Mina Ranjbarfard, Mohammad Aghdasi, Pedro López-Sáez and José Emilio Navas López

This paper aims to find and rank the barriers of the four knowledge management (KM) processes including generation, storage, distribution and application in the gas and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to find and rank the barriers of the four knowledge management (KM) processes including generation, storage, distribution and application in the gas and petroleum sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviewing the literature of KM and organizational learning, this paper extracted all of the barriers which impede KM processes. Then it designed a questionnaire for validating, ranking and categorizing barriers. Totally, 190 completed questionnaires were gathered from 26 gas and petroleum companies in Iran. Some statistical tests such as T, Friedman, Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney were used for analyzing data.

Findings

Findings reviewed the current literature of KM barriers, validated and ranked the barriers of knowledge generation, storage, distribution and application separately. The importance of knowledge generation and knowledge application barriers were significantly different between gas and petroleum companies. Hence they were disjointedly ranked for gas and petroleum. Finally, KM barriers were ranked according to their contribution to KM processes and the average mean of their importance in KM processes.

Practical implications

From the practical point of view, this paper suggests managers of gas and petroleum companies to emphasize solving high-priority barriers according to the KM process which they are focused on. Furthermore, the study provides a checklist that can be used as an assessment tool for evaluating KM processes considering barriers.

Originality/value

This paper finds the importance of each barrier for each of the four KM processes and ranks the “critical barriers” according to their contribution to four KM processes in the gas and petroleum sector.

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Rajasshrie Pillai and Brijesh Sivathanu

This study aims to use the novel approach of applying the behavioural reasoning theory (BRT) to understand the relative influence of reason for and reason against the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to use the novel approach of applying the behavioural reasoning theory (BRT) to understand the relative influence of reason for and reason against the adoption of mobile learning applications (M-learning apps) among information technology (IT) and information technology enabled services (ITeS) employees.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveys 680 employees of IT and ITeS companies in India to examine the adoption of M-learning apps for learning using the BRT and the primary data analysis was done using the partial least squares-structural equation modelling technique.

Findings

It is found that the context-specific adoption factors for M-learning apps are hedonic motivation, self-efficacy, learning autonomy, ubiquitous and relative advantage, whereas the reasons against adoption of the M-learning apps are traditional barrier, usage barrier and image barrier. It is also found that values of openness to change positively affect the reasons for adoption and do not significantly affect reasons against adoption of M-learning. Values of openness to change affect the attitude towards M-learning apps and attitude affects the adoption intention of M-learning apps for learning.

Research/limitations/implications

This cross-sectional study was conducted only in the Indian IT/ITeS firms and future research can be conducted in other sectors and countries to generalize the results.

Practical implications

This research uniquely highlights the adoption factors both for and against, which should be considered while developing marketing strategies for M-learning apps’ adoption. It is imperative for training managers to consider these factors during the selection of M-learning apps and for designers while designing the M-learning apps.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights towards the use of mobile apps for learning with the employees’ perspective using the BRT theory and it highlights the reason for adoption and reason against adoption of M-learning apps.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Paulette Cormier-MacBurnie, Wendy Doyle, Peter Mombourquette and Jeffrey D. Young

This paper aims to examine the formal and informal workplace learning of professional chefs. In particular, it considers chefs’ learning strategies and outcomes as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the formal and informal workplace learning of professional chefs. In particular, it considers chefs’ learning strategies and outcomes as well as the barriers to and facilitators of their workplace learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is based on in-depth, face-to-face, semi-structured interviews with 12 executive chefs from a variety of restaurant types. Chefs were asked questions that focused on how they learned, the learning outcomes that they experienced and factors that inhibited or facilitated their learning.

Findings

Findings suggest that the strategies, outcomes, barriers and facilitators experienced by professional chefs are similar in many respects to those of other occupational/professional groups. However, there were some important differences that highlight the context of chefs’ workplace learning.

Research limitations/implications

The sample, which is relatively small and local, focuses on one city in Canada, and it is limited in its generalizability. Future research should include a national survey of professional chefs.

Originality/value

Using a qualitative approach, this in-depth study adds to the literature on workplace learning, strategies, outcomes, barriers, facilitators and context factors by addressing a relatively understudied profession.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2010

Gareth Veal and Stefanos Mouzas

This paper seeks to give empirical examples of the processes whereby networks learn to collaborate. Specifically, the authors aim to examine efforts to learn to

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to give empirical examples of the processes whereby networks learn to collaborate. Specifically, the authors aim to examine efforts to learn to collaborate in response to the challenge of climate change.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses case study research methods to examine concepts previously developed in the literature and propose a conceptual framework of barriers to learning to collaborate.

Findings

Existing research on collaboration over environmental issues highlights the prevalence of cognitive deficiencies, an abundance of conflicts and disputes and the ignorance of exchange opportunities among interdependent actors. Based on a theoretical review and an empirical case study, the authors put forward a framework that involves three stages. The paper proposes that networks learning to collaborate undergo a process of: framing the problem; negotiating; and achieving wise trades.

Practical implications

At all three of the stages given above, there are significant cognitive biases, which can lead to failure to learn to collaborate. The paper gives examples that should help businesses and regulators to understand and avoid in‐built barriers that could lead to a failure of the network to learn to collaborate.

Originality/value

The paper reviews a number of research disciplines linked to collaboration and gives an empirical case study that explores their links. The authors then propose a conceptual framework of barriers to learning to collaborate, which can be used to help guide practitioners. Failure to learn to collaborate can be found in the many contemporary cases of conflicts and disputes; such as in the areas of intellectual property rights, international trade, inter‐firm alliances and vertical marketing systems.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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