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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Meisam Modarresi, Zahra Arasti, Kambiz Talebi and Maghsoud Farasatkhah

The purpose of this paper is to identify the growth barriers of women’s home-based businesses (HBBs) in Iran.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the growth barriers of women’s home-based businesses (HBBs) in Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative approach was used by 22 in-depth interviews with Iranian female HBBs owners/mangers.

Findings

Business growth barriers of women were categorized in a multi-level framework of individual barriers (micro), business-related barriers (medium) and environmental barriers (macro). The most important micro-level barrier is lack of skills and experience, while the financial barriers identified as the most business-related one and, finally, the problems of having work interactions with men is the most important environmental barrier women-owned HBBs mentioned.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this paper can help policy-makers better understand growth barriers for women-owned HBB and attenuate these barriers by developing purposeful supportive growth policies that are commensurate with the barriers. Also, HBB women owners themselves could better concentrate on removing barriers by deepening their understanding of their business growth barriers.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the scarce knowledge about women-owned HBBs in Iran, a rapidly growing, developing country, which can provide better insights from a less explored context. Moreover, as there is only a limited understanding of HBB growth, especially in relation to women business owners, the paper results can prove helpful for researchers in the domain of female entrepreneurs.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2019

Carianne M. Hunt, Sandra Fielden and Helen M. Woolnough

The purpose of this study is to explore the potential of coaching to develop female entrepreneurship by overcoming potential barriers. It sought to understand how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the potential of coaching to develop female entrepreneurship by overcoming potential barriers. It sought to understand how entrepreneurial self-efficacy can be applied to development relationships, through on-line coaching, examining changes in the four key elements of entrepreneurial self-efficacy enactive mastery, vicarious experiences, social persuasion and psychological arousal. The study examines the impact of coaching relationships on female entrepreneurial self-efficacy compared to a control group. The participant group was matched with coaches and undertook a structured six months’ coaching programme.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a longitudinal study using a mixed methods approach. Questionnaires investigating entrepreneurial self-efficacy were collected at two time points for both the coaching and control group. After the first time point, the coaching group was supported through a six months coaching development programme. At the second time point, questionnaires were again completed by both groups and qualitative data gather via interviews with the coaching group.

Findings

The findings from this study showed that coaching relationships had a positive impact on coachees’ entrepreneurial self-efficacy, compared to the control group in terms of enactive mastery, vicarious experience, social persuasion and psychological arousal. This suggests that coaching is a development intervention which can be used to enhance self-efficacy beliefs of female entrepreneurs, thereby increasing their chances of engaging in successful business creation and operation.

Research limitations/implications

The group size was a problem, with four of the coaching group and ten of the control group dropping out. The coaching participants left the intervention due to personal reasons but no reason could be established for the control group participants leaving the study. The problem of ‘Type II’ was considered and in an attempt to overcome this problem, data were shown at below 10% (p < 0.10). It would also have been useful to collect more qualitative data from the control group.

Practical implications

An online coaching programme provided by women for women, which is tailored to the individual, can support female entrepreneurs through the difficult stages of start-up and development phases of business development. Creating more successful women owned businesses will not only provide financial benefits, but should help provide additional entrepreneurial networks for women, as well as more positive female role models. Exposure to positive role models has been found to have a direct effect on entrepreneurial self-efficacy. This circular affect should in theory keep on increasing, if female entrepreneurs have access to the tailored support provided by coaching programmes such as the one used here.

Social implications

Considering the current global economic climate, it is increasingly important for women to be supported in small business ownership (Denis, 2012). Countries which actively promote women entering into business ownership will ultimately share the gains in terms of wider issues, i.e. improving education and health, and economic growth (Harding, 2007). If female entrepreneurship is to be encouraged and supported, provision needs to be designed and developed based on female entrepreneurs’ needs and requirements, rather than simply conforming to traditional business support models.

Originality/value

This study contributes to learning and theoretical debates by providing an understanding of female entrepreneurs' needs with regard to business support and how this can be related to and supported by coaching. It also adds to the literature on entrepreneurial self-efficacy, coaching and learning by providing empirical evidence to illustrate how coaching interventions, including the use of online methods, can have a positive impact on female entrepreneurial self-efficacy.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2015

Natalia A Kravchenko, Svetlana A Kuznetsova, Almira Yusupova, Thadavillil Jithendranathan, Lorman L Lundsten and Arkady Shemyakin

– The purpose of this paper is to conduct comparative research of small innovative entrepreneurship under different types of institutional environment in Russia and the USA.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct comparative research of small innovative entrepreneurship under different types of institutional environment in Russia and the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered among small innovative firms in the State of Minnesota (USA) and Novosibirsk Oblast (Russia). Mann-Whitney test for median differences adjusted for multiple comparisons using Benjamini-Hochberg procedure is used to establish statistically significant dissimilarities between Siberian and Minnesotan populations.

Findings

The results indicate that there are significant differences in the challenges faced by the Russian and American firms. The most important among them are the lack of legal structure for innovation and availability of qualified staff in Russia.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to two regions with comparable economic and geographic environments.

Practical implications

It is indicated in the results that significant changes in institutional business environment are necessary for the future development of innovative entrepreneurship in Russia.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to compare the challenges facing small innovative entrepreneurship in Russia and the USA.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

David Smallbone, Marcello Bertotti and Ignatius Ekanem

To provide an initial assessment of the nature and extent of the involvement of Asian‐owned firms in the creative industries in London; to identify and assess any barriers

Abstract

Purpose

To provide an initial assessment of the nature and extent of the involvement of Asian‐owned firms in the creative industries in London; to identify and assess any barriers they face; and draw out the implications for policy.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study, undertaken in late 2002. Data sources included official statistical data and previous reports, as well as a programme of semi‐structured, in‐depth interviews with 23 Asian entrepreneurs spread across eight sub‐sectors.

Findings

Asians are making a significant contribution to London's creative sectors, although they do face a number of specific constraints. Some of these are specific to the creative industries but others are shared with other small firms. However, few of these constraints appear to be exclusively Asian.

Research limitations/implications

There are some limitations relating to the small scale of the study and its focus on a single geographical location.

Practical implications

The research shows how (cultural) diversity can contribute to creativity and the competitiveness of regional economies, as well as individual businesses. This particularly applies in the creative industries because of extensive interlinkage with firms in other sectors.

Originality/value

In creative activities, cultural diversity is a source of potential competitiveness, because of the positive relationships between diversity, creativity and innovation. Asian owned firms in the creative sectors contrast with the low value added nature of many traditional areas of Asian business activity in the UK.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Emma McClelland, Janine Swail, Jim Bell and Patrick Ibbotson

There has been increased policy and research interest in the growing number of female entrepreneurs and their potential contribution to both the local and global economy…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been increased policy and research interest in the growing number of female entrepreneurs and their potential contribution to both the local and global economy. Nevertheless, the extant literature on female entrepreneurship is often limited to the start‐up phase of business. An important gap in the literature is an enquiry into the development of these female‐owned organisations from inception to maturity, and their growth in domestic and/or international markets. This paper therefore aims to address key themes such as motivation to start‐up, growing the business, gender issues and the challenges faced by these women.

Design/methodology/approach

An innovative, internet‐based methodology was employed to collect the data in the chosen locations. Using internet resources such as online media, company web sites and other pertinent sites, a significant volume of information was gathered. Any information gaps or issues requiring further clarification were then addressed via e‐mail exchanges with the individual entrepreneur.

Findings

Initial findings demonstrate threads of commonality between female entrepreneurs in different countries. It also highlights differences in the experiences of these women, not only across countries but also within certain countries. A comprehensive discussion of these findings is contained in the paper.

Research limitations/implications

This research has highlighted a number of issues which merit further investigation; however, the issue of social responsibility within this sample of female entrepreneurs would indicate that women have much more socially‐oriented motives for starting and developing a business. The authors would like to investigate this further using qualitative investigation of a larger sample within one country before drawing any definitive conclusions.

Originality/value

Given a limited understanding of such issues mentioned above, this contribution seeks to provide an insight into the heterogeneous experiences of female entrepreneurs using cross‐national data rather than a one‐country study.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Glenice J. Wood and Marilyn J. Davidson

Research in indigenous small business entrepreneurship in Australia is sparse. This paper aims to provide a review of the available literature culminating in a…

Abstract

Purpose

Research in indigenous small business entrepreneurship in Australia is sparse. This paper aims to provide a review of the available literature culminating in a comprehensive model of characteristics, motivations and potential barriers to entrepreneurial activity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a literature review.

Findings

“Push” factors were predominant as motivators for setting up business ventures and were strongly linked to the desire to improve severe disadvantage through very poor economic situations and negative racial stereotyping, discrimination and prejudice as well as addressing the needs of their community. Potential barriers to business development included lack of formal education, prior work experience, language barriers, culture conflicts and problems attaining sufficient finance. Female indigenous entrepreneurs faced both gender and racial discrimination.

Practical implications

This paper concludes with some suggestions on future research and government and policy directions to encourage indigenous Australian entrepreneurship as a means of economic development for this population.

Originality/value

The paper presents a unique comprehensive review and model of both male and female Australian indigenous entrepreneurs.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Robert Newbery and Gary Bosworth

The purpose of this paper is to challenge calls for a monolithic rural home‐based business (HBB) sector and instead propose meaningful sub‐sectors of HBB that fit within…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to challenge calls for a monolithic rural home‐based business (HBB) sector and instead propose meaningful sub‐sectors of HBB that fit within contemporary rural economic development theory. This informs business support and policy objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey analysis of rural microbusinesses in the North East of England compares home‐based and other rural microbusinesses to illustrate their defining characteristics. Case study interviews are then used to test theory development and provide greater understanding about the motivations and aspirations of HBB owners.

Findings

The research demonstrates that the rural HBB sector is not homogenous. For some, the home is the business, for others it is a convenient location and for others it is not the place of work, simply the registered business address. This has significant implications for the needs of each type of business and their prospects for growth.

Research limitations/implications

This paper introduces the concept of sub‐sectors of HBBs but more detailed survey work can establish whether these are fully inclusive. With a changing economic climate, further research might also examine the resilience of these businesses in recession and their ability to react to growth opportunities in a period of upturn.

Originality/value

As an emergent area of study in the fields of small business and rural economy, HBBs are potential vehicles for both social and economic development. With large numbers of HBBs in rural areas, this paper illustrates the need to understand both their potential and their limitations in order to maximise their contribution to vibrant and sustainable rural economy.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2021

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

This research paper concentrates on the benefits of online coaching for boosting the entrepreneurial self-efficacy of women with business aspirations in the UK. The coaching focused on mitigating business failure through efforts to elevate the female entrepreneurs' self-belief and focus on core goals. The results demonstrate that cultural barriers to entry into entrepreneurship can be overcome by women having access to tailored online coaching, since this can be flexibly arranged around other responsibilities.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Mirela Xheneti and Will Bartlett

This paper aims to investigate business growth in post‐communist Albania using an institutional perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate business growth in post‐communist Albania using an institutional perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes an institutional perspective, which emphasises the role of institutional change in enabling/constraining business growth whilst allowing for entrepreneurial objectives and motivations to be taken into account. The analysis is based on firm‐level data collected through a survey questionnaire in April‐July 2004. The paper uses principal components analysis and a regression model to explain the factors that determine the pace of business growth of small firms.

Findings

The analysis offers important insights into the nature of entrepreneurship in a post‐communist setting. The age of the firm, the age, education, qualifications and work orientation of the entrepreneur, insufficient information and corruption, explain the differential growth of firms. Older entrepreneurs grow faster suggesting unfulfilled aspirations during communism as well as their access to wider professional, social and possibly also political connections. The positive effect of corruption on business growth suggests that an ability to cope with a corrupt environment has been a necessary entrepreneurial skill during a period of chaotic change in social and formal institutions that has characterized transition in Albania.

Originality/value

This research can be of special interest to studies of entrepreneurship in institutional transformation contexts, and it contributes especially to the accumulation of knowledge on transition economies by looking at the little researched case of post communist Albania.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2008

Paul Westhead

This paper aims to identify four “types” of private small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) with regard to their “state” along the exporting experience spectrum.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify four “types” of private small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) with regard to their “state” along the exporting experience spectrum.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study explores survey information from a historic comparative static longitudinal database. Survey information was gathered in 1990/1991 from a stratified random sample of 621 manufacturing, construction and services businesses located in 12 contrasting environments in Great Britain. Surviving firms were re‐interviewed in 1997. The propensity to export was monitored at two points in real time. Information relating to actual behaviour rather than solely attitudes was gathered.

Findings

Strategic obstacles to exporting were not more likely to be cited by respondents in “disinterested exporter” rather than “disappointed exporter” firms. Also, a reactive exporting strategy was not more likely to be cited by respondents in “export capable” rather then “committed exporter” firms. Several statistically significant differences were detected with regard to the profiles of non‐exporting “disinterested exporter” and “disappointed exporter” firms, and exporting “export capable” and “committed exporter” firms.

Practical implications

Assuming an interventionist stance, this study suggests that practitioners need to consider the exporting experience profiles of SMEs. Practitioners seeking to increase the pool of exporting SMEs in local communities need to address an array of barriers, and not solely strategic barriers.

Originality/value

Guided by insights from traditional internationalization theory and international entrepreneurship theory, two hypotheses were derived relating to obstacles impeding export activity, and reasons cited for exporting. Evidence from a comparative statistic longitudinal base relating to firms scattered throughout Great Britain was explored. Multivariate logistic regression analysis detected differences with reference to firm export “type”.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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