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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2021

Bayu Rima Aditya, Ridi Ferdiana and Sri Suning Kusumawardani

Existing literature has reported a barrier list that could affect the implementation of digital transformation in higher education, yet the research question of how to…

Abstract

Purpose

Existing literature has reported a barrier list that could affect the implementation of digital transformation in higher education, yet the research question of how to identify barriers remained unanswered. Thus, this study intended to address this gap.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design adopted a mixed-methods approach based on the problem-centered design science research (DSR) process model for the development and evaluation of framework.

Findings

This study proposed a systematic framework of three sets of components: (1) the initial set of barriers; (2) the barrier rating scheme and (3) the barrier scoring matrix. The three-component of the framework is to identify and prioritize barriers to the successful implementation of digital transformation in higher education.

Research limitations/implications

The evaluation of the framework was only based on an expert opinion.

Practical implications

This study provided a direction to the policymakers for designing sensible strategies to increase the chances of a successful digital transformation in higher education.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the knowledge body by offering a more systematic understanding of barriers to digital transformation in higher education.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Bayu Rima Aditya, Ridi Ferdiana and Sri Suning Kusumawardani

This study aims to test a theoretical framework to identify and prioritize barriers in the implementation of digital transformation in higher education.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test a theoretical framework to identify and prioritize barriers in the implementation of digital transformation in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework was tested using the context of a particular nation: Indonesia. First, a survey questionnaire was conducted to identify the key barriers. Second, the contextual relationship between the key barriers was determined based on an expert’s input to find the importance level of barriers and the degree of difficulty to fix the barriers. Finally, a barrier priority matrix was developed to prioritize the barriers.

Findings

This study identified the key barriers in the implementation of digital transformation in higher education in Indonesia including eight contextual issues, one technical issue and two cultural issues with different levels of importance and difficulty. Based on the matrix constructed, this study also presented a list of the top 11 priorities of barriers.

Research limitations/implications

The results were based on a particular region context.

Practical implications

This study lays the foundation for the theoretical framework that is practically useful to perform the identification and prioritization of barriers. Besides, the result discussed in this study gives some direction for policymakers in designing sensible strategies to overcome the barriers.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this study is an empirical study that systematically identifies and prioritizes barriers to digital transformation in higher education.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Linda Banwell, Kathryn Ray, Graham Coulson, Christine Urquhart, Ray Lonsdale, Chris Armstrong, Rhian Thomas, Siân Spink, Alison Yeoman, Roger Fenton and Jennifer Rowley

Describes key aspects of the methodology and outcomes of the JISC User Behaviour Monitoring and Evaluation Framework in its first three annual cycles (1999‐2002). The…

Abstract

Describes key aspects of the methodology and outcomes of the JISC User Behaviour Monitoring and Evaluation Framework in its first three annual cycles (1999‐2002). The Framework was initiated to assure the JISC that their investment in digital content and network infrastructure facilitates use and learning, and to identify barriers and facilitators to the use of electronic information services (EIS). Key Framework outcomes are: a multi‐dimensional across sector methodology for the continued monitoring of user behaviour in respect of EIS and the factors that impact on that behaviour; a profile of user behaviour in respect of EIS over the three annual cycles of the Framework; the EIS Diagnostic Toolkit that can be used to benchmark development in the provision and use of EIS in specific disciplines or at specific institutions; a methodology for monitoring, and a profile of the EIS resources available to higher and further education users; and a summary of some of the key issues in their provision. The challenge for the future is the embedding of EIS in curricula and learning experiences.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 60 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Zahirul Hoque and Maybelle Chia

The purpose of this article is to explore how the strategic change following a corporate takeover impacted the nature and extent of use of the firm's management control…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explore how the strategic change following a corporate takeover impacted the nature and extent of use of the firm's management control systems (MCS), in particular its performance measurement system (PMS).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses Michael Porter's theory of competitive advantage and Robert Simons' levers of control framework to illustrate and interpret changes in the PMS within an Australian multinational subsidiary following its takeover by an overseas corporation. To provide empirical evidence on this issue, face‐to‐face interviews and archival data are used.

Findings

The findings reveal that the takeover resulted in changes in the firm's competitive forces (threat of potential entrants, bargaining power of buyers, threat of substitute products or services, bargaining power of suppliers, and rivalry among existing firms), and therefore the firm altered its strategy to change the rules of competition in its favor. Corresponding to the strategic change, the PMS was affected, with specific implications on Simons' four levers of control: interactive, diagnostic, beliefs, and boundary systems.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that a corporate takeover is an important phase for any organization, as it involves a change in the competitive environment and strategy, and needs to be facilitated by a change in the MCS to create and sustain superior performance.

Originality/value

This case study demonstrates how interactive and beliefs systems work together with diagnostic and boundary systems in the context of change in an organization. Past research devoted to strategic change and MCS has not documented this phenomenon.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2015

Lorella Cannavacciuolo, Maddalena Illario, Adelaide Ippolito and Cristina Ponsiglione

The purpose of this paper is to set out a methodological framework to investigate how the integration of an activity-based costing (ABC) logic into the pre-existent…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set out a methodological framework to investigate how the integration of an activity-based costing (ABC) logic into the pre-existent accounting system supports healthcare organizations in identifying the inefficiencies related to their diagnostic therapeutic pathways (DTP) and related reengineering interventions.

Design/methodology/approach

The BPM-ABC methodological framework has been applied to the case of a specific surgery pathway, at the Orthopaedic Division of a University Hospital in Italy.

Findings

The case-study described in the paper points out: first, how the Business Process Management (BPM)-ABC methodology is able to produce significant information about consumed resources and the costs of the activities, useful to highlight opportunities for DTPs improvement; second, the barriers related to a pre-existing accounting system based on cost centres that can hinder the implementation of the BPM-ABC model.

Practical implications

The case study points out the role of the ABC as a management tool for supporting decision-making processes. The ABC allows inferring information for two purposes. First, ABC supports a cost containment process as it allows highlighting the most cost-consuming activities and resources. Second, the ABC allows identifying reengineering paths, distinguishing between incremental and radical ones.

Originality/value

This study represents a remarkable reference raising the awareness of the pivotal role accounting systems play in the management of the organizational processes.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2018

Kerryn Bagley

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the experiences and practices of social and community service professionals working with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the experiences and practices of social and community service professionals working with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) or suspected FASD in New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

The research examined professionals’ empirical experience of working with FASD or suspected FASD. In total, 21 participants working in practice settings relevant to dual diagnosis were interviewed, with each interview being of 1–2 h duration. The interview data were transcribed and coded using the constant-comparative method in order to derive themes.

Findings

Participants identified a number of barriers to understanding or working with FASD: the limited knowledge of FASD and the absence of FASD from training contexts, difficulty obtaining institutional support and the challenge of working without a diagnosis. Participants also articulated a range of strategies for approaching FASD within the identified barriers of their practice contexts, specifically: working with alternative diagnoses, focussing on adjusting expectations, adopting a strengths-based approach, actively advocating for clients when working with other sectors and systems and focussing on prevention education.

Originality/value

This research expands the knowledge base for social and community service practice in contexts where FASD maybe a factor contributing to poor health and well-being outcomes for clients. It clarifies the challenges that professionals face when encountering FASD or suspected FASD in their work, reveals key gaps in individual and systemic knowledge about FASD and provides new insight into what professionals do to address these challenges. It also adds to the body of research concerning FASD in the Australasian context more broadly.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 12 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Nigel Wild and Li Zhou

The objective this paper is to develop and describe a conceptual framework for collaborative Ethical Procurement Due Diligence (EPDD) between International Aid…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective this paper is to develop and describe a conceptual framework for collaborative Ethical Procurement Due Diligence (EPDD) between International Aid Non‐Government Organisations (IANGOs) in Humanitarian Supply Chains (HSCs). Second, to explore EPDD relationships with IANGOs, IANGOs and their suppliers, IANGOs and their suppliers' suppliers, donors, IANGOs and IANGO suppliers.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of qualitative research in the shape of a number of in‐depth interviews, and the collection of secondary information across 11 IANGO organisations with senior logistics and purchasing managers.

Findings

Supply chain co‐opetition strategies are being enacted by IANGOs to explore the formulation of EPDD. Concerns surrounding ethical risk in HSCs differ from commercial supply chains (CSCs) in relation to NGO relationships with donors and supplier networks. EPDD by IANGOs beyond the first tier of suppliers in HSCs is limited to Lead IANGO(s).

Research limitations/implications

The case study approach adopted restricts the generality of findings; however, the research explores ethical behaviour in a new direction, that of IANGOs in HSCs, and their relationships with donors and supplier networks. This has implications for the management of ethical risk strategies in HSCs.

Practical implications

The paper determines barriers and enablers to collaboration between NGOs and as such assists in the process of developing risk‐rating systems for ethical procurement in NGO HSCs.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate the issues surrounding collaborative ethical procurement in IANGO HSCs, and associated ethical procurement risk management strategies in relation to donors and supplier networks.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Michael M. Kaye and Marilyn D. Dyason

The authors address the failure of companies to reach a sufficiently mature stage of quality required to be truly competitive and to exhibit the characteristics of…

Abstract

The authors address the failure of companies to reach a sufficiently mature stage of quality required to be truly competitive and to exhibit the characteristics of so‐called “excellent companies”. The authors set out to answer some hard questions identified during their research: for instance, why is it that companies know what they should be doing but fail to do it? Why is it that barriers to progress fail to be overcome? Why is there such a large gap between management theory and practice? Five themes emerge which offer a means of exploring these issues in greater depth in order to develop a way of resolving them: competitiveness ‐ the challenges faced by industry today; current “state of the art” strategic quality management ‐ where are we?; the learning organisation; the role of self‐assessment frameworks; performance management system approaches.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Paulo Amaral and Rui Sousa

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the identification of barriers to the implementation of benchmarking initiatives. Managers have little guidance on strategies for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the identification of barriers to the implementation of benchmarking initiatives. Managers have little guidance on strategies for successful implementation and face difficulties in anticipating problems. The main objective of this paper is to provide a better understanding of typical barriers that occur in a specific type of benchmarking: internal benchmarking.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper systematically develops a categorized list of barriers to internal benchmarking based on the literature; and validates and enriches them with an in‐depth case study of an internal benchmarking initiative.

Findings

Barriers to internal benchmarking initiatives of different types are found: organizational barriers (people, culture, and context), benchmarking project management barriers (planning and implementation, leadership, and business pressures) and benchmarking data barriers (difficulty to access/compare data). Future studies might take these categories as a solid starting point in furthering the understanding of barriers to benchmarking.

Research limitations/implications

The exploratory nature of the paper limits its generalizability.

Practical implications

The paper paves the way for the process of devising strategies to overcome the identified barriers. This is especially relevant because few studies to date have focused on these issues and benchmarking practitioners have insufficient knowledge to anticipate and overcome benchmarking‐related problems.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to theory building on the implementation of benchmarking in general; and on barriers to internal benchmarking initiatives in particular.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Michel Rod, Nicholas Ashill and Sarena Saunders

The purpose of this paper is to identify and illustrate those factors that influence successful implementation of major strategic change drawing on the example of a joint…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and illustrate those factors that influence successful implementation of major strategic change drawing on the example of a joint venture between two small firms in the health technology sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological approach involves a selective review of the strategic change implementation literature in conjunction with personal reflections on the part of the lead author regarding his involvement in the development and first year of operations of this joint venture.

Findings

The authors provide an illustration of the sorts of factors that influence major strategic change implementation from the literature integrated with the findings from the focal joint venture in developing a taxonomic framework and several propositions with accompanying managerial action points to help guide the development and management of a small joint venture as one example of major strategic change implementation.

Originality/value

The paper provides managers with a framework that identifies the sorts of issues that need to be considered when implementing this type of major strategic change.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

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