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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Wolfgang Michalski, Riel Miller and Barrie Stevens

The prospects for prosperity and well‐being in the 21st century will depend on leveraging social diversity to encourage technological, economic and social dynamism. A striking…

Abstract

The prospects for prosperity and well‐being in the 21st century will depend on leveraging social diversity to encourage technological, economic and social dynamism. A striking confluence of forces over the next twenty years could drive a twofold convergence: first, towards more highly differentiated and complex societies, and second, towards the adoption of a common set of general policy goals that are conducive to both diversity and social sustainability. In the opening decades of the 21st century four simultaneous and powerful societal transformations will give rise to more variety and interdependence: from the uniformity and obedience of the mass‐era to the uniqueness and creativity of a knowledge economy and society; from rigid and isolated command planning to flexible, open and rule‐based markets; from predominantly agricultural structures to industrial urbanization; and lastly, from a relatively fragmented world of autonomous societies and regions to the dense and indispensable interdependencies of an integrated planet. In different ways and in different parts of the world, greater social complexity will in all likelihood accompany these wrenching shifts. Rather than fear this increase in social diversity we should welcome the opportunities for learning and sharing that could bring prosperity and well‐being. Nevertheless, there are risks of heightened conflict due to the possible polarization that frequently accompanies the passing of old social orders and the emergence of new ones. Policy choices will be the determining factor in minimizing this friction and encouraging the potential synergies.

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Foresight, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Wolfgang michalski, Riel Miller and Barrie Stevens

At the outset of the 21st century, confidence in the effectiveness and legitimacy of established forms of governance is ebbing. This article considers historical developments in…

Abstract

At the outset of the 21st century, confidence in the effectiveness and legitimacy of established forms of governance is ebbing. This article considers historical developments in governance, the driving forces likely to transform governance worldwide and the policies that might have the best chance of enhancing governance capacities in line with the desires and needs of the future. Challenges and propects are discussed which entail the dual policy of: encouraging a virtuous circle between governance and technological, economic and social dynamism; and targeting improvements in learning infrastructure, the frameworks for establishing confidence, and the standards (mission/values) within which society functions. By improving the capacity to make and implement decisions throughout society these policies are likely to provide one of the main stepping stones to the realization of people’s aspirations in the 21st century.

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Foresight, vol. 2 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Wolfgang Michalski, Riel Miller and Barrie Stevens

The world stands on the threshold of a tantalizing opportunity: the possibility of a sustained economic boom over the first decades of the next millennium. This article outlines…

Abstract

The world stands on the threshold of a tantalizing opportunity: the possibility of a sustained economic boom over the first decades of the next millennium. This article outlines the confluence of forces – particularly the transition to a knowledge society, the emergence of a global economy and the pursuit of environmental sustainability – which could come together to propel huge improvements in wealth‐creating capacity and wellbeing world‐wide. The transition to a knowledge economy and society over the next few decades opens up the possibility of massive productivity gains. Equally significant, stimulus for a long boom could emerge from the creation of much more deeply integrated global markets for goods, services, capital and technology. Finally, the long boom could be sustained by a cooperative push to redirect the path of humanity’s relationship to the environment – a change entailing massive investments in new, less resource‐intensive patterns of consumption and methods of production. The unleashing of these dynamic forces hinges on two basic policy thrusts. First, economic dynamism in general and a long boom in particular will demand exceptional efforts – nationally and internationally – to encourage continuous innovation and high levels of investment. Second, with the prospects for a long boom contingent on the realization of a leap in the levels of international cooperation, decision makers will have to consider bold new approaches to negotiating and reconciling conflicting interests and divergent needs.

Details

Foresight, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

65

Abstract

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Foresight, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Michel Andrieu

This article examines the future of e‐money as a payment instrument and some of the microeconomic policy issues it will raise. The paper is in two parts. This first part focuses…

2888

Abstract

This article examines the future of e‐money as a payment instrument and some of the microeconomic policy issues it will raise. The paper is in two parts. This first part focuses on the various forms which electronic money is likely to take in the future, and considers key technological and economic factors that will shape its evolution. Part 2, to be published in the next issue of foresight, examines some of the major regulatory and institutional issues that are likely to have a bearing on the adoption of e‐money, notably concerns related to the regulation of payment systems, security, privacy and consumer protection.

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Foresight, vol. 3 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Michel Andrieu

This is the second part of a two‐part paper on the future of electronic payments. Part 1, which was published in the last issue of this journal, examined the various electronic…

1077

Abstract

This is the second part of a two‐part paper on the future of electronic payments. Part 1, which was published in the last issue of this journal, examined the various electronic forms of payment that are likely to emerge in the future, and considered some of the main technological and economic factors that will shape this evolution. This second part focuses on major regulatory and institutional issues that will influence the wider acceptance of electronic payment.

Details

Foresight, vol. 3 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Gambling Advertising: Nature, Effects and Regulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-923-6

Article
Publication date: 22 August 2017

Nataliya Perevoshchikova, Jordan Rigaud, Yu Sha, Martin Heilmaier, Barrie Finnin, Elena Labelle and Xinhua Wu

The Ni-based superalloy IN-738 LC is known to be susceptible to porosity and different types of cracking during the build-up process and, thus, challenging to manufacture using…

1433

Abstract

Purpose

The Ni-based superalloy IN-738 LC is known to be susceptible to porosity and different types of cracking during the build-up process and, thus, challenging to manufacture using selective laser melting (SLM). Determining a feasible set of operating parameters for SLM of nickel-based superalloys involves new approach to experimental design based on the Doehlert method that assists in determining an optimal (feasible) set of operating parameters for SLM of IN-738 LC powder alloy.

Design/methodology/approach

The SLM parameters are evaluated in terms of their effectiveness in obtaining the microstructure with a porosity content of <0.5 per cent and without micro-cracking. The experimental approach is exemplified with the Doehlert matrix response variable, relative density, by comparing Archimedes method with microstructural assessments of pores and cracks from image analysis. The effect of heat treatment (HT) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) on the microstructure of the SLMed IN-738 LC powder alloy has been examined and the consequential tensile response characterised.

Findings

By using optimised process parameters (low heat input, medium scanning speed and small hatching distance) which provides medium energy density, samples of IN-738 LC with a macroscopic porosity <0.5 per cent and free of micro-cracks can be manufactured by SLM. The results indicate that HIP of SLMed material did not lead to a noticeable effect on mechanical properties compared to HT of SLMed material suggesting that the level of both porosity and crack density might be already below the detection limit for the mere heat-treated material.

Originality/value

SLM processing parameters (power, scan speed, hatching distance) for IN-738 LC were successfully optimised after only 14 experiments using Doehlert design. Two independent methods, Archimedes method and image analysis, were used in this study to assess relative density of SLM-produced samples with sets of processing parameters showing coherency in prediction with predicted response by Doehlert design.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Gambling Advertising: Nature, Effects and Regulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-923-6

Book part
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Barrie Gunter

Abstract

Details

Gambling Advertising: Nature, Effects and Regulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-923-6

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