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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Harold Lazarus and Yair Holtzman

Abstract

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 23 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Barbara T. Pace

This paper briefly provides some thoughts on forward planning in end‐of‐life care, noting that there are good reasons for taking action with regard to our own demise…

Abstract

This paper briefly provides some thoughts on forward planning in end‐of‐life care, noting that there are good reasons for taking action with regard to our own demise. Provides an example of living will.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 23 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Lluis Mas, Paul Bolls, Emma Rodero, Miguel Barreda-Ángeles and Ashley Churchill

The purpose of this study is to determine how sonic logo’s acoustic features (intensity, pitch and pace) based on melodic tunes with no voice orient the response of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine how sonic logo’s acoustic features (intensity, pitch and pace) based on melodic tunes with no voice orient the response of consumers, attract attention, elicit levels of pleasantness and calmness and transmit brand personality traits.

Design/methodology/approach

A within-subject experimental factorial design is applied to measure emotional arousal (indexed as electrodermal activity) and enhancement on perceptual processing (indexed as heart rate), as well as self-reported factors, namely, calmness/excitement, pleasantness and brand personality scales.

Findings

Results show a significant increase on electrodermal activity associated with fast-paced sonic logos and a decrease in heart rate in slow-paced long sonic logos. Also, fade-up, pitch-ascending fast sonic logos are defined as more exciting and descending-pitch sonic logos as more pleasant.

Research limitations/implications

The use of sonic logos with no voice does limit its implications. Besides, the use of three variables simultaneously with 18 versions of sonic logos in a laboratory setting may have driven participants to fatigue; hence, findings should be cautiously applied.

Practical implications

First, sonic logos are best processed in a fade-up form. Second, fast pace is recommended to orient response, whereas slow pace is recommended to transmit calmness. Practitioners may opt for fast-paced sonic logos if the design is new or played in a noisy environment and opt for slow-paced sonic logos in already highly recognized sound designs.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to combine psychophysiological measures and self-reported scales in a laboratory experiment on how sonic logo’s acoustic features orient response, transmit emotions and personality traits.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Stuart Hannabuss

The management of children′s literature is a search for value andsuitability. Effective policies in library and educational work arebased firmly on knowledge of materials…

Abstract

The management of children′s literature is a search for value and suitability. Effective policies in library and educational work are based firmly on knowledge of materials, and on the bibliographical and critical frame within which the materials appear and might best be selected. Boundaries, like those between quality and popular books, and between children′s and adult materials, present important challenges for selection, and implicit in this process are professional acumen and judgement. Yet also there are attitudes and systems of values, which can powerfully influence selection on grounds of morality and good taste. To guard against undue subjectivity, the knowledge frame should acknowledge the relevance of social and experiential context for all reading materials, how readers think as well as how they read, and what explicit and implicit agendas the authors have. The good professional takes all these factors on board.

Details

Library Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Barbara J. Jago

This autoethnography considers the role of human relationships in the educational process. Approaching learning as a transformational process rooted in human experience…

Abstract

This autoethnography considers the role of human relationships in the educational process. Approaching learning as a transformational process rooted in human experience and interaction, I explore the central role of emotion in learning relationships. Through an analysis of a learnable moment experienced in a relational communication course on language, I theorize new ways of “doing” learning relationships.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-931-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Barbara Kaufman

Fueled by the relentless pressures of the 24/7 work schedule, globalization, large‐scale initiatives and scarce resources, leaders today are experiencing more and more…

Abstract

Fueled by the relentless pressures of the 24/7 work schedule, globalization, large‐scale initiatives and scarce resources, leaders today are experiencing more and more stress, fatigue and total burnout. At the same time, few leaders have learned the important lessons about addressing inherent stressors. Instead, leaders often choose to continue pursuing a pace that ultimately negatively affects both their work and personal lives. In fact, it is rare for leaders to stop their fast‐paced cycles, reflect on the goals and strategies they are creating and recognize the need to step back and use their change agent skills to improve their own work environment. Leaders can harness their strengths as strategic thinkers and risk‐takers in an effort to create a healthier and more effective balance. This article discusses the ways to do that through recognizing the causes, unlearning bad habits and recommitting to a more balanced life for themselves and their co‐workers. Campbell Soups CEO, among others, is cited as one good example.

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

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Book part
Publication date: 25 April 2014

Oili-Helena Ylijoki

This chapter presents some basic concepts on time studies and discusses what a temporal approach can offer for higher education research. Being an invariable constituent…

Abstract

This chapter presents some basic concepts on time studies and discusses what a temporal approach can offer for higher education research. Being an invariable constituent of life, time structures and organizes activities and processes in higher education, covering all of its levels and functions. Furthermore, the current policy agenda that emphasizes the need for higher education to accelerate innovation flows, and to speed up the production of new knowledge and workers, accentuates the importance of the temporal perspective. The chapter examines the dominant, taken-for-granted conception of time – clock time – which involves a linear, quantitative, cumulative, homogenized, abstract and decontextualized conception of time. The core features of clock time are described by the four Cs put forward by Barbara Adam: creation, commodification, colonization and control of time. It is argued that, in the current digital, post-modern era, social acceleration reshapes and transforms the nature of clock time, which results in compression of time, shrinking future and extended present, all manifest in the overall speeding-up of life. In addition, a temporal lens for analysing higher education is presented, with examples from empirical studies on time and temporalities in academic work and identity building.

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Research II
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-823-5

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles, Robert Detmering and Jessica English

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces and annotates periodical articles, monographs, and audiovisual material examining library instruction and information literacy.

Findings

Information is provided about each source, and the paper discusses the characteristics of current scholarship, and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1937

SEPTEMBER sees most librarians again at the daily round, although some, including those of the universities and schools, are still scattered on mountains, golf‐courses…

Abstract

SEPTEMBER sees most librarians again at the daily round, although some, including those of the universities and schools, are still scattered on mountains, golf‐courses, beaches and oceans for a short while yet. To older men there is a curious feeling aroused by the knowledge that there is no Library Association Conference this month. They may, in a measure, find compensation in attending the annual meeting of the London and Home Counties Branch of the Association, which will be at St. Albans, or that of A.S.L.I.B., which has Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, as its venue. Both, by some lack of care which might have been avoided, occur on the same week‐end, September 24–26. Quite clearly the special problems of librarianship technique, such as processes, book‐selection and purchase, classification, catalogues, fines, publicity, salaries, hours, and so on almost infinitely, can no longer be discussed profitably at the Annual Meeting of the Library Association; smaller gatherings, such as these, are their fitting place. We make a suggestion to the L.A. Council, for what it is worth and without pretence to being original. It is that it should indicate to all its branches and sections the main questions to which they should devote attention, and that in due course they should produce their conclusions on them. These, being pooled, would form the basis of the L.A. Annual Meeting. This would make a purposeful programme for all, and the results of the Conference might then be considered definite and practical.

Details

New Library World, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

NAFTALY S. GLASMAN and PAULINE J. PAULIN

This paper summarizes two exploratory case studies of teachers' perceptions about their receptivity to evaluation and about possible determinants of this receptivity. The…

Abstract

This paper summarizes two exploratory case studies of teachers' perceptions about their receptivity to evaluation and about possible determinants of this receptivity. The first study explores relationships of receptivity to teacher controllability of evaluated behaviors. It surveys perceptions of elementary school teachers and suggests the existence of a strong positive relationship in activities associated with motivating students. The study also offers a discussion of the significance of controllability as a possible determinant of receptivity. The second study extends the investigation of the relationship between receptivity and controllability. It surveys perceptions of secondary school teachers. Specifically, it explores relationships between receptivity and controllability over two kinds of decision: those associated with teaching activities and those associated with evaluation of these activities. The study also explores the effect on the above relationships of trust and confidence which teachers have in the expertise of their evaluators. The former two relationships are found to be positive. The first, but not the second, is found to be affected by trust and confidence. Selected implications of the findings are offered.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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