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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Barbara Rockenbach

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172

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Nisa Bakkalbasi, Damon Jaggars and Barbara Rockenbach

The purpose of this paper is to describe an assessment design for the Developing Librarian training program. The Developing Librarian training program created by and for…

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1721

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe an assessment design for the Developing Librarian training program. The Developing Librarian training program created by and for librarians and professional staff in the Humanities and History division is a two-year training program to acquire new skills and methodologies to support the digital humanities. The program is based on the assumption that learning must happen in context; therefore the training is project based with all participants engaged in building a digital humanities research site as a team. This approach enables participants to learn about new tools in a sustained manner that parallels the way humanities researchers are likely to use them.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to measure the success of achieving this goal, program designers defined three objectives: learn tools and methods that support the emerging research needs and trends in the humanities; create a more interesting and engaging work environment for librarians and professional staff; and engage effectively with the humanities research community across the University. Three methods/instruments were: Explicit Self-Reflections to assess what participants learned in each training unit; the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale to measure how participants feel about their work before and after the training program; and the Skill Set, Knowledge and Attitude Assessment to be administered at completion to measure the effectiveness of the training program as a whole.

Findings

At the time of writing, the Developing Librarian Project is mid-way to completion, and implementation of the assessment plan is ongoing. Based on these self-reports, there is evidence that the training program has been effective, and participants have been successful in meeting most of the learning objectives identified in the units completed. While self-assessment of knowledge and skills may have its limitations, this technique is proving adequate and efficient for achieving the program’s goals. This method encourages experimentation and establishes failure as an important aspect of the learning process.

Research limitations/implications

An assessment approach such as this does not measure the impact of training and development on digital humanities research, but initiates a valuable process, highlighting skills gaps at the individual, and organizational levels. These data are important for identifying and implementing appropriate training opportunities for librarians supporting emergent research activities and for understanding what skills and professional preparation are needed for new staff recruited into the organization.

Originality/value

A successful training program should be benchmarked, evaluated in a substantive and systematic way, and improved continuously. A formal assessment plan, directly tied to clearly articulated objectives, helps assure that such a program is effectively evaluated, iteratively developed, and successfully implemented. The Developing Librarian Project provides a useful model of how an academic library can leverage assessment and evaluation processes to identify skills gaps and training needs and generate actionable data for improving staff learning.

Details

Library Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Barbara Rockenbach and William Ying

To describe new features in ARTstor.

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793

Abstract

Purpose

To describe new features in ARTstor.

Design/methodology/approach

The piece includes descriptions of the new functionality – an XML gateway that will enable federated searches initiated locally via a metasearch engine to include results from the ARTstor Digital Library; and the development of a standard application programming interface (API) that will allow content stored in local repositories or other licensed resources to be searchable and retrievable via the ARTstor software.

Findings

ARTstor Digital Library is a repository of hundreds of thousands of digital images and related data; the tools to use those images; and a usage environment that seeks to balance the rights of content providers with the needs and interests of content users.

Originality/value

Provides information of value to information management professionals.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 22 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2007

Barbara Elam

The purpose of this paper is to study the information‐seeking behaviors of art historians.

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1701

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the information‐seeking behaviors of art historians.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of art historians was done to ascertain their use of e‐resources. The paper discusses the impact of electronic resources and digital image databases on the research methodologies of today's art historians.

Findings

Although art historians depend on using the library for research, many have a rather limited awareness of electronic resources and have not fully developed the skills to utilize then to their fullest potential.

Originality/value

This follows up on Deirdre R. Stam's 1984 study of the information‐seeking behaviors of art historians.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Julia Gelfand, Colby Riggs and Philip Calvert

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194

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Abstract

Details

Challenging the “Jacks of All Trades but Masters of None” Librarian Syndrome
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-903-4

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2009

Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles and Latisha Reynolds

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

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4597

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces and annotates periodical articles, monographs, and audiovisual material examining library instruction and information literacy.

Findings

The findings provide information about each source, discusses the characteristics of current scholarship, and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Barbara J Stewart–Knox, Audrey Rankin, Brendan P Bunting, Lynn J Frewer, Carlos Celis-Morales, Katherine M Livingstone, Arnout R.H. Fischer, Rui Poínhos, Sharron Kuznesof, Mike J Gibney and John C. Mathers

Randomised controlled trials identify causal links between variables but not why an outcome has occurred. This analysis sought to determine how psychological factors…

Abstract

Purpose

Randomised controlled trials identify causal links between variables but not why an outcome has occurred. This analysis sought to determine how psychological factors assessed at baseline influenced response to personalised nutrition.

Design/methodology/approach

Web-based, randomised, controlled trial (RCT) was conducted across seven European countries. Volunteers, both male and female, aged over 18 years were randomised to either a non-personalised (control) or a personalised (treatment) dietary advice condition. Linear mixed model analysis with fixed effects was used to compare associations between internal and external health locus of control (HLoC), nutrition self-efficacy (NS-E) and self-report habit index (S-RHI) at baseline (N = 1444), with healthy eating index (HEI) and Mediterranean diet index (MDI) scores between conditions post-intervention (N = 763).

Findings

An increase in MDI scores was observed between baseline and six months in the treatment group which was associated with higher NS-E (p < 0.001), S-RHI (p < 0.001) and external HLoC (p < 0.001). Increase in HEI between baseline and six months in the treatment group was associated with higher NS-E (p < 0.001) and external HLoC (p = 0.009). Interaction between time and condition indicated increased HEI scores (p < 0.001), which were associated with higher S-RHI scores in the treatment than control group (p = 0.032). Internal HLoC had no effect on MDI or HEI.

Originality/value

Psychological factors associated with behaviour change need consideration when tailoring dietary advice. Those with weaker habit strength will require communication focussed upon establishing dietary habits and support in integrating advised changes into daily routine. Information on habit strength can also be used to inform how progress towards dietary goals is monitored and fed back to the individual. Those with stronger habit strength are more likely to benefit from personalised nutrition.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2009

Robb Willer

Here I present a theory of collective action that emphasizes the role of status. I argue that collective action contributions earn individuals improved status by signaling…

Abstract

Here I present a theory of collective action that emphasizes the role of status. I argue that collective action contributions earn individuals improved status by signaling their concern for the group's welfare relative to their own. Having received greater prestige for their contributions to group goals, individuals’ actual motivation to help the group is increased, leading to greater subsequent contributions to group efforts and greater feelings of group solidarity. This “virtuous cycle” of costly contributions to group efforts and enhanced standing in the group shows one way in which individuals’ prosocial behaviors are socially constructed, a consequence of individuals’ basic concern for what others think of them. I discuss a variety of issues related to the theory, including its scope of application, theoretical implications, relationship to alternative models of reputation and prosocial behavior, possible practical applications, and directions for future research.

Details

Altruism and Prosocial Behavior in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-573-0

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