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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Priscilla Burnham Riosa, Andrea Greenblatt and Barbara Muskat

Youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often have co-occurring health care needs and are likely to come into contact with several health care professionals over their…

Abstract

Purpose

Youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often have co-occurring health care needs and are likely to come into contact with several health care professionals over their lives. At the hospital, youth with ASD may require specialized supports to optimize health care experiences and for medical services to be delivered safely. At present, there is a limited understanding of how to best support this patient population. The purpose of this paper is to develop, implement, and evaluate an online training module for hospital staff about ASD.

Design/methodology/approach

To evaluate participants’ perceived utility of the learning tool, a post-module survey was administered.

Findings

In all, 102 health care professionals and other hospital staff completed the training and evaluation measure. Majority of participants had prior ASD-focused education (66 percent) and had experience working with at least 20 youths with ASD (57 percent). Majority of participants (88 percent) perceived the information from the module to be helpful in their daily work and reported that they learned something new (63 percent). Participants were interested in receiving additional ASD online module training opportunities on topics including: hands-on behavior management strategies, in-hospital resources, guidance on treatment adherence, and ASD training geared specifically to protection services staff.

Originality/value

The results from this evaluation have important practice implications for hospital staff working with patients with ASD and their families. Evidence-based strategies were easily accessible for staff and the module can be feasibly built upon and expanded as well as disseminated beyond the current hospital setting.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

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Abstract

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The Development of the Maltese Insurance Industry: A Comprehensive Study
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-978-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1969

THE idea of a central service and supplies organisation for libraries—a “Library Centre”— such as exist abroad and are described in Library Supply agencies in Europe, is…

Abstract

THE idea of a central service and supplies organisation for libraries—a “Library Centre”— such as exist abroad and are described in Library Supply agencies in Europe, is like most ideas in librarianship, not a new one, even taking into account the establishment of Norway's Biblioteksentralen over 60 years ago in 1902, which at that time was called Folkeboksamlingenes Ekspedisjon. This idea, like so so much else, seems to have originated in the fertile brain of Melvil Dewey, taking its final and lasting form as the Library Bureau, established by Dewey himself in 1882.

Details

New Library World, vol. 71 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Abstract

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Experiencing Persian Heritage
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-813-8

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Abstract

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Delivering Tourism Intelligence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-810-9

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

Ali H. Al‐Badi, Rafi Ashrafi, Ali O. Al‐Majeeni and Pam J. Mayhew

This paper aims to explore the issues of information technology (IT) disaster recovery (DR) and business continuity planning (BCP) in light of Cyclone Gonu in Oman.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the issues of information technology (IT) disaster recovery (DR) and business continuity planning (BCP) in light of Cyclone Gonu in Oman.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper includes a survey of the latest literature on the subject, then documents a study of public and private sector organizations together with their DR and BCP practices.

Findings

The paper investigates how public and private organizations in Oman plan to respond to disasters. It shows that while some organizations pay attention to the need for DR/BCP, many do not. A significant finding is that while organizations have disaster related plans, almost half of those surveyed do not rehearse them. Nevertheless, organizations surveyed indicate that they have learned valuable lessons from Gonu. It remains to be seen whether these lessons will be turned into effective and properly deployed DR/BCP plans.

Originality/value

This paper draws lessons from the experiences and challenges raised by Gonu, and concludes with a set of recommendations that organizations may adopt to ensure business continuity. It provides a useful evaluation of the preparedness of IT departments in both public and private sectors in Oman. The recommendations given at the end of the paper could be of a great value for many organizations and groups, spreading awareness of the importance of being prepared for such eventualities.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2012

Ali Saif Al‐Aufi and Peter Johan Lor

This paper aims to utilize Whitley's theory of the intellectual and social organization of the sciences and build on research carried on by Aarek et al., Vakkari…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to utilize Whitley's theory of the intellectual and social organization of the sciences and build on research carried on by Aarek et al., Vakkari, Rochester and Vakkari, and Åström, to analyze both intellectual and institutional characteristics of Arabic library and information science (LIS).

Design/methodology/approach

Data derived from a content analysis of sampled research articles published in seven core peer‐reviewed Arabic LIS journals and from an inventory of the currently identified Arabic LIS educational institutions, professional associations, and scholarly communication channels were analyzed in terms of Whitley's theory and relevant LIS research.

Findings

The social organization of Arabic LIS has highly influenced its intellectual organization. An analysis of types and diversity of institutional affiliations, determination of terminology, resources and fund accessibility, scholarly communication of intellectual productivity, and research collaboration point to high levels of “tasks uncertainty”, low levels of “mutual dependency” and uncontrolled “reputational autonomy”.

Research limitations/implications

Because Arabic LIS institutions, associations, and research channels are poorly represented on the internet or in accessible literature, it was difficult to collect data comprehensively. While the findings are suggestive and are in agreement with views from the Arabic LIS literature, the results cannot be generalized to regions beyond the Arab world. This investigation is not primarily intended as a contribution to the philosophy of LIS, but to describe the development of LIS in the Arab States within a broad social and intellectual framework.

Originality/value

While there is a considerable body of theoretically‐oriented interpretations for bibliometric findings, no research has been conducted to analyze the social and intellectual dimensions of LIS in the Arab world. This paper also fills a gap for this type of the research in Arabic LIS and creates awareness of Arabic LIS for English‐speaking readers.

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Mark Wyatt and Ewen Arnold

The purpose of this paper is to explore the school‐based learning mentoring of a senior teacher of English in Oman, who was conducting action research into her mentoring…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the school‐based learning mentoring of a senior teacher of English in Oman, who was conducting action research into her mentoring practices while engaged in part‐time in‐service language teacher education. The senior teacher realized teachers in her school found post‐lesson discussions in English with inspectors challenging and, using video‐stimulated recall, tried to help them become more reflective.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative case study research methodology: semi‐structured interviews provide insights into the senior teacher's perceptions of her own development and professional knowledge of reflective practice and mentoring. They also provide oral accounts of her action research, written accounts of which are provided by reflective writing. Audio‐recordings and transcripts of post‐lesson discussions, triangulated with classroom observation, provide evidence of mentoring practices.

Findings

The senior teacher developed creative and flexible solutions to the challenges she faced, in the process gaining confidence and assuming mentor identity. Various factors helped, including a supportive environment, the in‐service teacher education course and engagement with video‐stimulated recall.

Research limitations/implications

Despite methodological limitations, including limited observational data and use of self‐report, there are implications for socio‐cultural contexts where English has a semi‐official role in mentoring discussions and where there are moves towards reflective models of teacher development.

Practical implications

Video‐stimulated recall may be a particularly effective tool for supporting learning mentoring in contexts where loyalty to the “in‐group” encourages sharing. To facilitate learning mentoring, the creation and maintenance of supportive environments appears crucial.

Originality/value

Learning mentors seeking fresh ideas, teacher educators and school managers will find this useful.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2020

José António C. Santos, Margarida Custódio Santos, Luis Nobre Pereira, Greg Richards and Luis Caiado

Little is known about how tourists’ eating habits change between everyday life and holidays. This study aims to identify market segments based on changes in food…

Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about how tourists’ eating habits change between everyday life and holidays. This study aims to identify market segments based on changes in food consumption and experiences of a sun-and-sea destination’s local food. The authors evaluate to what extent tourists consume local food and assess the contribution of local food experiences to the tourists’ overall experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The target population was all tourists visiting the Algarve in the Summer 2018 and included both domestic and international sun-and-sea tourists. A sample of 378 valid questionnaires was collected. Data analysis included descriptive analysis, statistical tests and cluster analysis.

Findings

Cluster analysis identified three segments: non-foodies, selective foodies and local gastronomy foodies. Results indicate that tourists change their eating habits during holidays, eating significantly more seafood and fish and less legumes, meat, fast food and cereals and their derivatives. International and domestic sun-and-sea tourists reported that eating local food contributes significantly to their overall tourism experience.

Practical implications

Sun-and-sea destinations should promote the offer of local dishes, especially those that include locally produced fish and seafood, to improve the tourist experience, differentiate the destination and increase sustainability.

Originality/value

The authors address three identified research gaps: a posteriori segmentation based on tourists’ food consumption behaviour; measurement of changes in eating practices between home and in a sun-and-sea destination; and assessment of the role of food experiences to overall tourism experience of tourists visiting a sun-and-sea destination.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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