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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2020

Mohamed Ahmed Kaaroud, Noraini Mohd Ariffin and Maslina Ahmad

The purpose of this study is to examine the extent of audit report lag and its association with governance mechanisms in the Islamic banking institutions in Malaysia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the extent of audit report lag and its association with governance mechanisms in the Islamic banking institutions in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The extent of audit report lag is defined by the number of days from a company’s financial year-end to the signature date on its audit report. The sample of the study comprises 112 observations of Islamic banking institutions’ financial reports for the period 2008-2014. A balanced panel data analysis is performed to analyse the association between the extent of audit report lag and governance mechanisms.

Findings

The findings show that the extent of audit report lag for the sample selected ranges from a minimum period of 7 days to a maximum period of 161 days, and the extent of audit report lag is approximately two months on average. A fixed effects analysis indicates that audit committee expertise and audit committee meeting have significant association with the extent of audit report lag. On the other hand, board independence, audit committee size and Shari’ah board expertise have insignificant association with the extent of audit report lag. In addition, one control variable (Islamic bank size) is found to be significantly associated with longer audit report lag.

Practical implications

The findings provide useful feedback for Malaysian policymakers on the past and current practices of financial reports and of governance mechanisms. The findings of the study would help the policymakers in monitoring the Islamic banking institutions’ compliance with financial reports submission requirements. The policymakers perhaps could relook into governance mechanisms that reduce the extent of audit report lag in the Islamic banking institutions and implement regulations to strengthen them.

Originality/value

Unlike the majority of prior studies that investigated the association between the extent of audit report lag and governance mechanisms, this study provides two contributions. First, to the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first piece of research that examined the association between governance mechanisms and the extent of audit report lag in Islamic banking institutions. Second, the study examined the association of new governance variable, namely, Shari’ah committee expertise which has not been previously examined in the literature of audit report lag.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

James A. Wilcox

Deregulation and other factors permit and encourage financial institutions to become more integrated, both within their own (financial) industries, such as banking and…

Abstract

Deregulation and other factors permit and encourage financial institutions to become more integrated, both within their own (financial) industries, such as banking and insurance, and across these industries. Financial regulators have responded with like integration. As financial institutions increasingly compete with firms from other industries and areas, financial regulators similarly compete more across borders. The resulting competition in financial regulation enhances innovation, choice, and efficiency. The advent of home-run regulation, which in general allows financial institutions to adhere only to the financial regulations of their home area and is spreading across the US and Europe, may allow numerous regulatory regimes within a given market.

Details

Research in Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-277-1

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Sulaiman Lujja, Mustafa Omar Mohammad, Rusni Bt. Hassan and Umar A. Oseni

In 2014, Islamic finance assets are estimated to have exceeded US$2 trillion with over 100 products and an annual growth of over 20.7 per cent, across more than 76…

Abstract

Purpose

In 2014, Islamic finance assets are estimated to have exceeded US$2 trillion with over 100 products and an annual growth of over 20.7 per cent, across more than 76 countries, most of which are members of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC). Despite this remarkable market expansion, numerous OIC members such as Uganda are yet to fully adopt this unique financial system because of regulatory constraints. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which Uganda can benchmark the Malaysian experience and best practices to overcome the regulatory challenges in introducing Islamic Banking.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study adopts qualitative research methods through documentary review to elicit relevant information from the existing laws in Uganda that would accommodate the Islamic Banking system. Interpretive analysis and analytical methods are used to analyze data.

Findings

The Malaysian experience and best practices of Islamic Banking regulation need to be benchmarked by regulators. Relevant laws which require some amendments include section 37(a) and 38(1) of the Financial Institutions Act 2004 and section 29(3)(a) of the Bank of Uganda Act 2000. Similarly, tax legislation needs amendments to ensure a level playing field for Islamic finance and conventional finance products.

Originality/value

This is one of the earliest studies on models of Islamic Banking regulation suitable for adoption in Uganda. This study contributes to literature on how other jurisdictions (especially those with less regulatory prudence) could regulate Islamic Banking in a dual banking system jurisdiction.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2021

Yaoteng Zhao, Supat Chupradit, Marria Hassan, Sadaf Soudagar, Alaa Mohamd Shoukry and Jameel Khader

Recently, the financial sector has faced significant challenges regarding the market competition, its technical efficiency and risk factors around the globe and gain…

Abstract

Purpose

Recently, the financial sector has faced significant challenges regarding the market competition, its technical efficiency and risk factors around the globe and gain recent researchers' intentions. Thus, the present study aims to examine the impact of technical efficiency, market competition and risk in banking performance in Group of Twenty (G20) countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Data have been obtained from the World Development Indicator from 2008 to 2019. For analysis purpose, random effect model and generalized method of moments (GMMs) have been executed using Stata.

Findings

The results revealed that market competition and banks' capital efficiency have a positive impact on banking performance, while banks' lending efficiency and non-performing loans have a negative association with the banking sector performance of G20 countries. These outcomes provide the guidelines to the regulators that they should formulate the effective policies related to the lending practices and non-performing loans that could improve the banking sector performance worldwide.

Research limitations/implications

The study has examined only three economic factors like the technical efficiency rate, market competition and risk element, and their influences on banking institutions' operational and economic performance. But the analysis has proved that except these factors, several factors affect banking institutions' operational and economic performance. Thus, future scholars recommend they analyze all the banking sector areas, pick more factors and enlighten their operational and economic performance influences. Moreover, the author of this article has chosen a particular source for collecting data to meet his study's objective. Only a single piece of software has been applied to analyze data; thus, the data collected for this paper may be incomplete, lack accuracy and reliability. Therefore, the future authors are recommended to use multiple sources to collect data and its analysis to ensure the comprehension, completeness and accuracy.

Originality/value

Last but not least, this study with the evidences from the banking sector of G20 countries tries to show on the banking management how the risk element matters in the banking sector in an economy. It makes it clear in which areas the banking institutions may be exposed to the risks, and how much sever different kinds of risks may be. Thus, it motivates the management to set a body of persons within the organization to monitor the risks, to try to avoid them and to overcome the problems created by these risks events.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Nabilah Rozzani, Intan Salwani Mohamed and Sharifah Norzehan Syed Yusuf

The purpose of this paper is to explore the implementation of a mobile network system for an Islamic microfinance institution, made in collaboration with a commercial bank

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the implementation of a mobile network system for an Islamic microfinance institution, made in collaboration with a commercial bank in Malaysia. It also intends to highlight any emerging issues pertaining to the implementation of technology into the disbursement and repayment system of an Islamic microfinance institution from their clients’ perspectives. As Islamic microfinance industry is still growing in Malaysia, findings gathered throughout the course of study are also intended to boost further knowledge relating to this area.

Design/methodology/approach

By using a case study method, interview sessions were conducted separately with clients of the Islamic microfinance institution. The purpose of interview sessions is to identify the benefits and problem that surrounds the usage of mobile banking into the repayment system for Islamic microfinance products. Data triangulation with various public documents was conducted to enhance the credibility and reliability of data, also to support the claims that were made by the respondents.

Findings

It was found that clients are quite satisfied with the disbursement process through a mobile solution. However, the same cannot be said with the repayment process. The difficulties in using the mobile solution pose a major threat to its success. As most clients are not born to be technological savvy, the lack of easiness in methods for the usage of a mobile solution for their transactions pushes them away from further exploring the benefits that can be brought in by the function. Other risks which were highlighted include concerns towards breach of trust and risks of robbery. Clients of the case study, on the other hand, are concerned that the transfer of cash between their meeting venues to the bank would expose them to the public who might try to take advantage from the situation.

Research limitations/implications

As the current study had only focusses on mobile banking aspect of the repayment system for one Islamic microfinance institution, a multiple case study could be adapted to investigate various banking channels being implemented by different Islamic microfinance institutions in Malaysia and their current success.

Practical implications

By highlighting several issues through this study, it is hoped that this Islamic microfinance institution would consider applying other means of payment that are available in the market that is not only cost-efficient, but also beneficial for clients of the institution.

Originality/value

This study highlights the setbacks in the usage of technology by clients of Islamic microfinance institution in Malaysia. Although many approved to the diffusion of innovation in Malaysian banking sector, the same has yet to be achieved in the Islamic microfinance industry, which clients are mostly technology illiterate.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 43 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Shatha Qamhieh Hashem and Islam Abdeljawad

This chapter investigates the presence of a difference in the systemic risk level between Islamic and conventional banks in Bangladesh. The authors compare systemic…

Abstract

This chapter investigates the presence of a difference in the systemic risk level between Islamic and conventional banks in Bangladesh. The authors compare systemic resilience of three types of banks: fully fledged Islamic banks, purely conventional banks (CB), and CB with Islamic windows. The authors use the market-based systemic risk measures of marginal expected shortfall and systemic risk to identify which type is more vulnerable to a systemic event. The authors also use ΔCoVaR to identify which type contributes more to a systemic event. Using a sample of observations on 27 publicly traded banks operating over the 2005–2014 period, the authors find that CB is the least resilient sector to a systemic event, and is the one that has the highest contribution to systemic risk during crisis times.

Details

Management of Islamic Finance: Principle, Practice, and Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-403-9

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Pauline W.J. van Esterik-Plasmeijer and W. Fred van Raaij

The purpose of this paper is to test a model of banking system trust as an antecedent of bank trust and bank loyalty. Six determinants of trust and loyalty are included…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test a model of banking system trust as an antecedent of bank trust and bank loyalty. Six determinants of trust and loyalty are included: competence, stability, integrity, customer orientation, transparency, and value congruence. The study provides insights which determinants are crucial for explaining bank trust and bank loyalty, and thus for rebuilding trust and loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey among 1,079 respondents of 18 years and older in The Netherlands on person trust, system trust, bank trust, and their scores on determinants of trust and loyalty. Structural equations modeling (AMOS) has been performed to provide insights into the relationships between concepts such as person trust, system trust, bank trust, and bank loyalty. The importance of determinants to explain bank trust and bank loyalty has been assessed as well.

Findings

Integrity is the most important determinant of bank trust. Transparency, customer orientation, and competence are also significant. Trust is a strong predictor of loyalty. Determinants explaining bank loyalty are: competence, stability, transparency, and value congruence. System trust is also a determinant of bank trust. The meaning of these results is discussed in the paper, as well as the managerial implications of these findings.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected in May 2014 with a large sample, when the financial crisis came to an end. Distrust still remained as a consequence of the crisis. Banks are now rebuilding trust and loyalty. This research provides indications which determinants of trust and loyalty are important in this process and should be focused upon. A longitudinal study how trust and loyalty are developing would give insights and feedback on managerial actions.

Practical implications

Results provide insights into the causes and reasons of (dis)trust. From this study, banks get insights with a priority matrix which determinants are below par but important for specific banks and should be focused on and improved at the short term.

Social implications

Trust in banks and other financial institutions is crucial for the functioning of the banking system and for society at large. Restoring trust is a matter of fundamental changes of the bank-customer relationships, not only by communication but by sincere behavior (integrity) and benevolence in the customer interest.

Originality/value

The authors are not aware of research using all six determinants (competence, stability, integrity, customer orientation, transparency, and value congruence) to explain and predict bank trust and bank loyalty, and their implications for trust and loyalty in banks.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

John Cheese, Abby Day and Gordon Wills

An updated version of the original (1985) text, the book covers all aspects of marketing and selling bank services: the role of marketing; behaviour of customers;…

Abstract

An updated version of the original (1985) text, the book covers all aspects of marketing and selling bank services: the role of marketing; behaviour of customers; intelligence, planning and organisation; product decisions; promotion decisions; place decisions; price decisions; achieving sales. Application questions help to focus the readers' minds on key issues affecting practice.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Nguyen Phuc Canh, Christophe Schinckus, Thanh Dinh Su and Felicia Hui Ling Chong

This paper aims to offer an empirical study of the impact of institutional quality on the banking system risk and credit risk.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer an empirical study of the impact of institutional quality on the banking system risk and credit risk.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying cross-sectional dependent tests and stationary tests to check the property of our sample, the panel corrected standard errors model is recruited as the main estimator, while feasible generalized least squares, pool ordinary least squares (OLS), robust pool OLS and other estimators are used as a robustness check for an unbalanced panel data for 56 economies divided into three subsamples between 2002 and 2015.

Findings

The empirical results show several significant contributions. First, an improvement in institutional quality is an important factor to reduce the banking system risk. This effect of the institutions is less important in well-capitalized, highly profitable and in high-economic growth countries. This effect is also stronger in highly liquid banking systems. Notably, a better institutional quality helps to reduce the banking system risk in the highly concentrated banking system. Second, institutional quality has a significant negative relationship with the banking credit risk, especially in highly concentrated banking systems and in high-growth countries. This influence is weaker in highly liquid and well-capitalized banking systems. Finally, better institutions reduce the positive effect of trade openness, but it induces a higher credit risk for the banking system from the trade openness. Notably, a better institutional quality enhances the negative effect of foreign direct investment (FDI) inflow on both banking system risk and credit risk. These findings are documented for a global sample and three subsamples: low and lower-middle-income economies, upper-middle-income economies and high-income economies.

Originality/value

This study provides some recommendations, for policymakers, on the roles of institutions in the banking system and financial stability.

Details

Journal of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science, vol. 26 no. 51
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-1886

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 August 2014

Fouad H. Beseiso

This chapter’s goal is to define the kind of seeds to be planted for moving forward in the safe and stable drive toward a leading central banking role directed at…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter’s goal is to define the kind of seeds to be planted for moving forward in the safe and stable drive toward a leading central banking role directed at achieving a sustained Islamic banking and finance development within the global financial system. The system witnessed the input of Islamic banking with its fruitful contribution as a feasible banking structure in both implementing agreed reforms and shaping the next steps directed toward crisis prevention and crisis resolution.

Approach and Methodology

The adopted approach is based upon scientific conceptual basis as well as the practical experience related to the central banking role and Islamic banking evolution. This chapter will define the strategic role of Central Banks and highlight the conceptual basis governing the leading role of central banks as well as the practical basis derived from our central banking and Islamic banking experience.

Contribution

In light of the conceptual and practical basis for enabling an efficient and effective role of Central Banks as a regulatory body in shaping the future of the Islamic Financial System. Legal, institutional and managerial strategic determinants for this role have been defined.

The analytical work of this chapter crystallises in a pioneering initiative the main determining factors governing the role of central banks as the main regulatory body for Islamic banking, and how this role could be effective in affecting the future role to be played by the Islamic banks in the global financial system. Also, to this end, the integrated required role by central banks, public policies, multilateral institutions and Islamic banks are illustrated.

Findings

Energy and cooperative hard work and commitment from all players, including the regulators of Islamic banks supported by public policies, international and multilateral institutions and members of the Islamic banking family is thought to be the main determining factor for transforming the Islamic banking family into one that will make the Islamic people and all humanity – through the global financial system – live with more stability, welfare and happiness.

Details

The Developing Role of Islamic Banking and Finance: From Local to Global Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-817-4

Keywords

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