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Book part
Publication date: 24 August 2016

Shaminder Takhar

This chapter addresses Bangladeshi female students’ experiences of higher education in the United Kingdom through the race/gender trajectory. Research shows that although…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter addresses Bangladeshi female students’ experiences of higher education in the United Kingdom through the race/gender trajectory. Research shows that although minority ethnic women invest heavily in education, they go on to face obstacles in the labour market. However, there is a strong desire to study which is evident in the increasing numbers of Bangladeshi women applying to university since 1994. The chapter draws on empirical research with women who have claimed a kind of ‘agentic autonomy’ to pursue education in the face of structural inequalities.

Design/methodology/approach

The chapter is based on research conducted with a sample of Bangladeshi women studying at or recently graduated from university. Qualitative research was carried out in the form of semi-structured interviews with 13 participants.

Findings

The study finds that Bangladeshi women are undeterred by structural inequalities in higher education and employment. Although they expect to face some difficulty finding suitable employment, they are optimistic about the future. They represent a group of women who have been able to achieve their objectives to study at degree level and show aspirations towards achieving similar objectives after graduation.

Originality/value

Bangladeshi women show agency and agentic behaviour to negotiate access to higher education institutions. This will, in the future have a knock-on effect in employment.

Details

Gender and Race Matter: Global Perspectives on Being a Woman
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-037-4

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Roberta Adami, Andrea Carosi and Anita Sharma

This paper aims to study long-term savings accumulation in the UK. The authors use cross-sectional information from the extensive data set of the Family Resources Survey…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study long-term savings accumulation in the UK. The authors use cross-sectional information from the extensive data set of the Family Resources Survey to compare long-term saving amongst different ethnic groups with the control group, the native population. The paper reflects on whether different groups are more likely to suffer poverty in retirement.

Design/methodology/approach

In this analysis, the authors apply the life-cycle framework to explain saving profiles. This theoretical model has been used extensively in the field of economics and can be applied to empirical studies to examine changes in income and saving patterns over the life-course. The framework contends that individuals make savings decisions to smooth consumption over different phases of their life-cycle.

Findings

The findings indicate that socio-economic factors are key elements in determining whether individuals plan for retirement if factors are controlled for the differences in saving behaviours between ethnic minorities and the control population decrease considerably. Asian women, with good education and social standing, display greater saving rates than the control group, while the socio-economic disadvantage suffered especially by Pakistani and Bangladeshi women is key to their inability to save long-term. High levels of poverty in retirement are more likely to be caused by the interaction of low levels of education, part-time work and long spells of unemployment than by ethnicity.

Originality/value

The important contribution to the debate on savings by ethnic minorities is the extension of the life-cycle model to specific sections of the population and to proffer new insights into their saving/dis-saving patterns and ultimately their welfare in retirement.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2019

Samina Saifuddin, Lorraine Dyke and Md Sajjad Hossain

The purpose of this paper is to create a nuanced understanding of the barriers women high-tech professionals face in Bangladesh. The main aim is to identify the extent to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to create a nuanced understanding of the barriers women high-tech professionals face in Bangladesh. The main aim is to identify the extent to which these barriers are common across different contexts and to explore the barriers that are unique and situated in the local socio-cultural context.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews with high-tech professionals were conducted to identify and explore the barriers.

Findings

Although some of the barriers are common across different contexts, most of the barriers women professionals face arise due to the interaction between situated socio-cultural practices and gender. The dynamics of socio-cultural and patriarchal norms reinforce gender biases and gendered practices that afford men with greater control over resources and systematically limit women’s access to opportunities.

Research limitations/implications

The study recruited 35 participants using snowball sampling. From a methodological perspective, future research could benefit from recruiting a larger, more varied sample using random sampling.

Practical implications

Women experience barriers due to both internal organizational features and external contextual barriers. The findings suggest that some of these barriers can be removed through governmental and organizational policies and through appropriate intervention strategies delivered in partnership with governmental and non-governmental organizations.

Originality/value

The study makes a unique contribution by using a macro-social lens to analyze the meso-organizational practices and micro-individual phenomena thereby providing a holistic view of the barriers faced by women professionals in Bangladesh.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Roiyah Saltus and Christalla Pithara

Research evidence indicates the need for studies that explore the salience of dignity from the perspective of older people from a range of ethno-linguistic and cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

Research evidence indicates the need for studies that explore the salience of dignity from the perspective of older people from a range of ethno-linguistic and cultural backgrounds. Drawing findings from a mixed-methods study on social-care expectations of community-dwelling older women from black and minority-ethnic backgrounds, the purpose of this paper is to explore the interrelationships between life-course events (such as migration) and the roles adopted by the women throughout their lives, which shaped their understanding of dignity.

Design/methodology/approach

Face-to-face, semi-structured interviews with 32 older women in Wales were conducted in the participants’ first languages. The interview schedule was developed, piloted and peer-reviewed; it covered the themes of migration, perceptions of dignity, dignity in later life, perceptions of care and care with dignity. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. This paper focuses on what dignity meant to older women and how a sense of dignity was fostered in later life.

Findings

For the participants, a sense of dignity in later life was shaped by migration to the UK, and their shifting, transnational understanding of growing old in the UK and of the perceived worth and value of the roles they played. Although some women also saw other platforms (such as work and their status as professionals) as being of importance, a sense of purpose fostered in their roles as wives, mothers and grandmothers, and as mentors and guardians of cultural knowledge, underpinned their understanding of dignity, and reinforced their sense of acknowledgement and worth. Fostered from an early age through interactions with the family and close community (religious, cultural or ethnic), respect for older people was revealed to remain a key element of the participants’ personal and cultural value systems, as were the ways in which respect should be both earned and manifested. The sense of heightened vulnerability, because of advancing age, and the impact of cumulative negative encounters and racialised micro-aggressions, were real and pressing.

Practical implications

Given the changing demographic of the older population throughout Europe and the world, there is a need to raise awareness among policy makers and practitioners of the importance of dignity from a range of perspectives – providing first-hand accounts that bring these to life, and data that can be used to help develop effective interventions.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the understanding of dignity from a transnational, multi-ethnic perspective; the potential impact of multiple social positions (being old, being a woman, being a migrant and being from a minority-ethnic group) on the perception of being treated and regarded as important and valuable; and the need to raise awareness among policy makers and practitioners of the importance of dignity from a range of perspectives, providing first-hand accounts that bring these to life and that can be used to help develop effective social-care interventions.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1981

S. Akhtar

Though female labour force participation (FLFP) rates have been widely analysed across countries, the analysis of migrant women's participation has been consistently…

Abstract

Though female labour force participation (FLFP) rates have been widely analysed across countries, the analysis of migrant women's participation has been consistently ignored in the literature. The few studies that have been conducted concentrate largely on sociological and anthropological aspects of migrant women (see Foner (1976)). This article will investigate immigrant FLFP rates, which are generally found to be different from their counterparts in the immigrants' country of origin. To evaluate the immigrant FLFP rate we analyse and quantify the nature and significance of its various demographic, socio‐economic and cultural determinants.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Shehla Riza Arifeen and Caroline Gatrell

The purpose of this paper is to make a case for empirical research for British Pakistani managerial and professional women, a group who have remained invisible in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to make a case for empirical research for British Pakistani managerial and professional women, a group who have remained invisible in organization studies; to give voice to their experiences, to highlight the issues and challenges they are facing as women who have careers, their perceptions of what they are and how they have reached where they are and where do they think they would be going while taking an all‐inclusive view of the historical/social/culture/religious context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper undertakes a comprehensive re‐examination of the intersectional approach. An approach of gender with ethnicity and with religion and nationality or diaspora is suggested, in order to capture identities and focuses on relationship between gender and other categories of difference, in particular gender.

Findings

A review of race/ethnicity in organization studies in the UK reveals the homogenizing of ethnicities and a gap, as there is a lack of focused research on a large ethnic group in the United Kingdom. The paper then argues for intersectionality as being the most valid method as a means of analysis of a complex phenomenon, as it bridges partly the theoretical gap between critical theory and liberalism or deconstructionist tradition.

Originality/value

Empirical research on this marginalized group of women will highlight the structures and systems that are created and maintained. These may be self‐created and self‐perpetuated, but unless and until voice has been given to their experiences they will remain unknown.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Migration Practice as Creative Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-766-4

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Raisa Tasneem Zaman and Md.Fazla Mohiuddin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how menstruation specific stigma and behavior impacts female employee performance in Bangladesh. Besides, it aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how menstruation specific stigma and behavior impacts female employee performance in Bangladesh. Besides, it aims to investigate if nonwork-related stress has any mediating role in the menstruation-related stigma–employee performance and menstruation-related behavior–employee performance relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model is developed and tested using structural equation modeling (SEM) using Analysis of Moment Structures (AMOS) 25. A total of 400 respondents participated in a self-administered survey, of which 375 questionnaires were retained after discarding questionnaires with incomplete responses.

Findings

Stigma and behavior related to menstruation were found to have a significant negative effect on female employee performance. Menstruation specific nonwork-related stress was found to partially mediate between menstruation-related stigma–employee performance and menstruation-related behavior–employee performance relationship.

Originality/value

This is the first study to link menstruation specific stigma and behavior and female employee performance using SEM in the context of the Bangladeshi women employees. It is also the first study to investigate the mediating role of nonwork-related stress in the menstruation specific stigma–employee performance and menstruation specific behavior–employee performance relationship in the context of Bangladeshi women employees.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Roiyah Saltus and Christalla Pithara

Drawing findings from a large mixed-method study on perceptions of dignity, care expectations, and support in relation to older women from Black and minority-ethnic…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing findings from a large mixed-method study on perceptions of dignity, care expectations, and support in relation to older women from Black and minority-ethnic backgrounds, the purpose of this paper is to explore the interrelationships between life course events and the multiple roles adopted by women at different points in time that have shaped their perceptions of care and their care expectations in old age.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 32 semi-structured interviews were undertaken, allowing for the collection of data on the participants’ understanding of growing old, and the meaning and attributes of care and what care with dignity “looked and felt like”. The theoretical framework is guided by a life-course approach and grounded within an intersectionality perspective. The majority of the participants were migrants.

Findings

Social markers such as ethnicity and cultural identity were found to influence the participants’ understanding and expectations of care with factors such as gender identity and integration in the local community also of importance. How women felt they were perceived and “recognised” by others in their everyday lives with particular focus at the time of old age with the increased potential of loss of dignity due to declining capabilities, raised the importance of the family involvement in care provision, and perceived differences in the attributes of paid and non-paid care. The notion of “care from the heart” emerged as a key attribute of care with dignity. Care with dignity was understood as a purposeful activity, undertaken with intent to show respect and to acknowledge the participants’ sense of worth and value.

Practical implications

The implications of this study are relevant in the current debate taking place at the EU level about the lived experiences of ageing migrant groups and care expectations.

Originality/value

The study highlights the importance of the social nature of dignity, how wider societal structures can impact and shape how care is understood for older women of migrant and minoritised backgrounds, and the need to explore migration and care across the life course.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Peter J. Aspinall and Ferhana Hashem

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question: in the British state's relationship with its diverse minority ethnic communities, how have politics framed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question: in the British state's relationship with its diverse minority ethnic communities, how have politics framed administrative allocation of language support services? The dynamics of policy development are investigated, a tangible effect of the shift from unofficial pragmatic multiculturalism towards community cohesion/“Britishness” having been a government focus on English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) rather than translation/interpreting. This change has revealed a tension between the demands of identity and equality for minority ethnic people: respect for cultural identity requires provision of translation/interpreting while creating (political) equality between majority and minority communities entails the latter having access to the political language so placing an emphasis on ESOL.

Design/methodology/approach

An evidence synthesis is undertaken of policy documents relating to the British state's provision of language support services and data on the skill levels in English from government surveys.

Findings

The relative contribution of financial constraints and new policy/ideological positions to changes in the direction of policy and provision is assessed. With respect to the “new approach to ESOL”, this process of discretionary allocation that privileges policies of integration and community cohesion rather than language need itself is viewed against the inadequacies of the data currently available on levels of English language proficiency in providing the basis for making policy decisions and allocating resources.

Originality/value

The level of English language skills amongst Britain's minority ethnic groups and of government policy to address skill deficits has been substantially neglected. The paper provides a policy focus ahead of the release of the 2011 Census findings on language questions.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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