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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Keith Blois, Rujirutana Mandhachitara and Tasman Smith

Retailing organizations in Bangkok range in type from the traditional through to the most modern. Also, while there are agglomerations of small stores selling similar…

Abstract

Retailing organizations in Bangkok range in type from the traditional through to the most modern. Also, while there are agglomerations of small stores selling similar ranges of goods, there are also some of the most up‐to‐date large shopping malls in the world. Although such agglomerations of retailing activity are not unique to Bangkok, Bangkok’s development is arguably unusual in three ways: the number of agglomerations continues to grow; these new agglomerations are dealing in a wide range of goods and not just electronic gadgets; and one particular agglomeration dominates the Bangkok market for its range of goods. A survey was carried out in 1999 of a sample of the stores in Pantip Plaza, a mall that is in an agglomeration. The results show the need to improve our understanding of the factors leading to agglomeration.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 29 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2004

Kamol Chumrusphonlert, John P. Formby and John A. Bishop

Dominance techniques are used to analyze and rank inequality, welfare, and poverty across regions in Thailand in the 1990s. Inference-based dominance methods are applied…

Abstract

Dominance techniques are used to analyze and rank inequality, welfare, and poverty across regions in Thailand in the 1990s. Inference-based dominance methods are applied to consumption expenditure microdata from the Household Socio-Economic Surveys (SES) of 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998 and 2000. Attention is focused on the period immediately before and after the economic contraction of 1996–1997. Lorenz dominance is employed to assess inequality, while first-order Engel food share dominance is applied to rank welfare across time and among regions. Poverty is evaluated by comparing truncated food-share quantile functions. The evidence reveals that the economic crisis in 1997 seems to affect inequality in Bangkok (the richest region) more than the Northeast (the poorest region), and most dramatic changes occur in the North and South. Welfare in Bangkok is unambiguously higher than in other regions before and after economic contraction. In fact, the great economic contraction changes the rankings of economic well-being and poverty only in the North, South, and Northeast.

Details

Studies on Economic Well-Being: Essays in the Honor of John P. Formby
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-136-1

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2018

Veerachai Gosasang, Tsz Leung Yip and Watcharavee Chandraprakaikul

This paper aims to forecast inbound and outbound container throughput for Bangkok Port to 2041 and uses the results to inform the future planning and management of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to forecast inbound and outbound container throughput for Bangkok Port to 2041 and uses the results to inform the future planning and management of the port’s container terminal.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used cover a period of 16 years (192 months of observations). Data sources include the Bank of Thailand and the Energy Policy and Planning Office. Cause-and-effect forecasting is adopted for predicting future container throughput by using a vector error correction model (VECM).

Findings

Forecasting future container throughput in Bangkok Port will benefit port planning. Various economic factors affect the volume of both inbound and outbound containers through the port. Three cases (scenarios) of container terminal expansion are analyzed and assessed, on the basis of which an optimal scenario is identified.

Research limitations/implications

The economic characteristics of Thailand differ from those of other countries/jurisdictions, such as the USA, the EU, Japan, China, Malaysia and Indonesia, and optimal terminal expansion scenarios may therefore differ from that identified in this study. In addition, six particular countries/jurisdictions are the dominant trading partners of Thailand, but these main trading partners may change in the future.

Originality/value

There are only two major projects that have forecast container throughput volumes for Bangkok Port. The first project, by the Japan International Cooperation Agency, applied both the trend of cargo volumes and the relationship of volumes with economic indices such as population and gross domestic product. The second project, by the Port Authority of Thailand, applied a moving average method to forecast the number of containers. Other authors have used time-series forecasting. Here, the authors apply a VECM to forecast the future container throughput of Bangkok Port.

Details

Maritime Business Review, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-3757

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 27 June 2017

The political and economic consequences of flooding in Thailand.

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Nantaga Sawasdipanich, Supa Puektes, Supaporn Wannasuntad, Ankana Sriyaporn, Chulepon Chawmathagit, Jirapa Sintunava and Gamjad Paungsawad

The purpose of this paper is to develop and evaluate the Standards of Healthcare Facility for Thai Female Inmates (SHF-TFI) through healthcare service improvement.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and evaluate the Standards of Healthcare Facility for Thai Female Inmates (SHF-TFI) through healthcare service improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

This research and quality improvement project was comprised of three phases. Surveying healthcare facilities and in-depth interviews with female inmates as well as prison nurses were employed in Phase I. Expert reviews and public hearing meetings were used for developing the SHF-TFI in Phase II. Satisfaction questionnaires, focus group interviews of the female inmates, and in-depth interviews with nurses and prison wardens were utilized to evaluate feasibility and effectiveness of SHF-TFI implementation in Phase III.

Findings

The SHF-TFI was elaborated in order to be more specific to the context of the correctional institutes and correspond with healthcare as to the needs of female inmates. It was divided into three main aspects: administrative standards, health service standards and outcome standards. After implementation, nurses reflected on the feasibility and benefits of the SHF-TFI on the organizations, inmates and nurses. The female inmates perceived remarkable improvement in the healthcare services including physical activity promotion and screening programs for non-communicable diseases, the physical environment and sufficiency of medical equipment. Moreover, the pregnant inmates and incarcerated mothers with children shared their views on better antenatal and child developmental care, as well as availability of baby supplies.

Originality/value

The findings support the feasibility and effectiveness of the SHF-TFI for quality care improvement and applicability of the Bangkok Rules in women’s correctional institutes.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2009

Aurilla Aurelie Bechina Arntzen, Lugkana Worasinchai and Vincent M. Ribière

This paper aims to present how Bangkok University (BU) embarked on its knowledge management journey by examining how knowledge management processes could contribute to

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present how Bangkok University (BU) embarked on its knowledge management journey by examining how knowledge management processes could contribute to improve the educational environment by providing new styles of teaching and by increasing the relationships between faculty, students and staff.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the reasons why Bangkok University started its KM initiative. It presents the adopted KM approach, the tools developed as well at the KM action plan.

Findings

The initial overall benefits emerging from the early stage of KM at Bangkok University are encouraging. The educational community has improved not only through the communication and cooperation between students and staff, but also through creating an environment that supports efficiently the cross‐organizational learning and knowledge‐sharing processes.

Practical implications

The KM experience of Bangkok University could be used by other universities or educational institutions as one approach/strategy/guidelines to launch a KM initiative.

Originality/value

Few cases of KM implementations in the university environment have so far been published.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Case study
Publication date: 17 October 2012

Robert Alan Lewis and Ewa Maria Mottier

Human resources management, international human resources management.

Abstract

Subject area

Human resources management, international human resources management.

Study level/applicability

The case is suitable for undergraduate or graduate/training programmes specialised in international dimensions of HRM.

Case overview

The study aims to evaluate the experiences of hotel employees at the Mandarin Oriental Bangkok's new employee centre. This centre, called the “O-Zone”, is an example of the hotel's commitment to the well-being of its staff. On a larger scale, it is an illustration of a method to maintain employee motivation and commitment in the luxury hotel industry. The case is particularly useful to investigate as the hotel has created a unique approach to employee well-being in a large urban setting where employees experience a stressful living environment, including long commutes. This is supported by studies in the literature which reveal that burnout and stress are important factors to consider for hotel employees.

Expected learning outcomes

The case study allows students to discover the following key learning points: an example of a well-being initiative for employees of a luxury hotel in the Thai context; an investigation of the need for employers in luxury hotels in Thailand to attract and retain talent; and an understanding of the use of incentives at work for employee motivation in the Thai luxury hotel industry.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available; please consult your librarian for access.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 2 no. 8
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

Antony Feeny, Theera Vongpatanasin and Arphaporn Soonsatham

Explains that in under 40 years the retailing industry in Thailand has developed from a traditional and backward industry into one that by the turn of the century may be…

Abstract

Explains that in under 40 years the retailing industry in Thailand has developed from a traditional and backward industry into one that by the turn of the century may be as modern and vibrant as any in the world. However, uneven distribution of economic activity has meant that most of the major developments have taken place in Bangkok which accounts for 50 per cent of gross domestic product, but wealth and retailing activity are now spreading to the rest of the country where more than 80 per cent of the population live. Describes the diversity of Thai retailing. Explains its historical development, and outlines the differences between retailing in provincial Thailand and in Bangkok. Describes the different types of stores now being developed and the recent modernizing trends in the industry. Suggests the likely future trends in retailing over the next few years.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Jarrett D. Davis, Glenn Michael Miles and John H. Quinley III

This paper is a part of a series of papers seeking insight into a holistic perspective into the lives, experiences and vulnerabilities of male-to-female transgender…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is a part of a series of papers seeking insight into a holistic perspective into the lives, experiences and vulnerabilities of male-to-female transgender persons (from here on referred to as “transgender persons”/“Ladyboys”) within the sex industry in Southeast Asia. “Ladyboy” in Thai context specifically refers to the cultural subgroup, rather than the person’s gender identity and is not seen as an offensive term. Among the minimal studies that have been conducted, the majority have focused on sexual health and the likelihood of contracting or spreading HIV/AIDS, while often ignoring the possibility of other vulnerabilities. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The study interviews 60 transgender persons working within red light areas of Bangkok. The final research instrument was a questionnaire of 11 sub-themes, containing both multiple choice and open-ended questions.

Findings

This study found that 81 percent of participants had entered the sex industry due to financial necessity. There was also a high vulnerability among transgender sex workers to physical and sexual violence. This includes nearly a quarter (24 percent) who cite being forced to have sex and 26 percent who cite physical assault within the last 12 months.

Social implications

These findings can aid the development of programs and social services that address the needs of ladyboys, looking beyond gender expression and social identity to meet needs and vulnerabilities that often go overlooked.

Originality/value

This survey provides deeper understanding of the vulnerability of transgender sex workers, including their trajectory into sex work and potential alternatives.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 39 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Ruth Banomyong

Lao PDR, as the sole land‐locked country in South East Asia, is dependent upon available infrastructure in neighbouring countries for fast and efficient import of goods…

Abstract

Lao PDR, as the sole land‐locked country in South East Asia, is dependent upon available infrastructure in neighbouring countries for fast and efficient import of goods. The validity of a cost model for multimodal transport, which was originally proposed by Beresford and Dubey (1990) and developed by Beresford (1999), is tested against a real case in international logistics, namely the import of wine from Marseilles in France to Vientiane in Lao PDR. The main elements of the model are as follows: cost, time, distance, transport mode and intermodal transfer. The model is tested using real data over a series of alternative routes between Marseilles and Vientiane. The selection of appropriate international logistics system will have a direct impact on the efficiency of Lao PDR import channels. The research findings clearly demonstrate that the “sea‐road” combination via Danang Port in Vietnam is the most competitive in terms of costs while the “sea‐rail‐road” option via port Klang in Malaysia and through Thailand offers the fastest transit time.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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