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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Chamila Subasinghe

While some people are mindful of what a personal space that also belongs to a common façade portrays to outsiders, why other people treat this personal space as a mere…

Abstract

Purpose

While some people are mindful of what a personal space that also belongs to a common façade portrays to outsiders, why other people treat this personal space as a mere utility space invisible to the public eye must be determined. International students who live in single-bedroom apartments with balconies and were mostly married were investigated regarding the meaning they attach to their balcony spaces. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This work also hypothesized that residents of these units perceived their balconies as a liminal space that oscillates between a spatial repertoire for familiar memories and a versatile, utilitarian device for temporary storage. A naturalistic inquiry was then conducted among purposefully sampled apartment dwellers via in-depth, open-ended and semi-structured interviews.

Findings

While offering much needed spatial economy to dwellers, the cues and codes revealed that the balcony space could furnish a sense of membership to established social cohorts. The balcony space further brings an element of escape and ease into impecunious student life by means of its ability to offer a broad spectrum of spatial-aspatial needs that manifested in forms of personalizations and exploitations.

Originality/value

A knowledge gap in socio-cultural appropriation of on-campus apartments for sustainable redevelopment where the majority of consumers were married/partnered, international students has been investigated.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 December 2020

Dicle Aydin and Gevher Sayar

The purpose of this paper is to assess using of balconies in apartment buildings. In the research, by questioning the use of balconies as to the coronavirus disease 2019…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess using of balconies in apartment buildings. In the research, by questioning the use of balconies as to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) process and before, the place and importance of the balcony in the apartment house were questioned.

Design/methodology/approach

Balcony performance dimensions and components, which were revealed based on the studies conducted, were analyzed with questions directed to the individuals living in the apartment (one person every flat). In the research in which behavioral and functional performance is questioned through users, the survey method was used and the data were analyzed in the Statistical Product and Service Solutions (SPSS) program. Apart from the performance dimensions, data on the characteristics of the balconies were also obtained from the answers of the users.

Findings

The use of balconies has increased during the pandemic process and has become more important in apartments. The size of the balcony is related to the size of the house. The functional performance of the balcony is linked to the size of the balcony, behavioral and environmental values. The balcony should be large enough to accommodate equipment for daily activities, the proximity to the surrounding buildings, view, noise affect the performance of the balcony.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to the questionnaire applied to apartment users in Konya (Turkey) city center. Male and female users participated in the study, and the use of the balcony was questioned.

Practical implications

Apartment design includes results that contribute to architects regarding the location and use of the balcony. It also includes the results that can be evaluated by local governments in terms of binding rules on balconies in zoning regulations.

Social implications

The balcony is one of the rooms of the house, which is mainly designed in connection with the kitchen and living room / living room and shared by the household. The balcony is used as a socializing place for the common actions of the house users. This space that opens to the outside is valuable in terms of providing communication with people outside.

Originality/value

The fact that no study has been conducted to question the use of the balcony over the user makes this study valuable. In addition, questioning the use of the balcony during the pandemic process is important in terms of revealing the importance of the need for open space in an apartment. The results will contribute to architects and local administrations in terms of binding rules in design regarding the location of the balcony in the house.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2020

Stephen Agyefi-Mensah, Zoya Evans Kpamma and Daniel Ebo Hagan

Knowing and understanding the spatial needs of users is imperative for the design of livable and sustainable houses. However, the practical and theoretical difficulties…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowing and understanding the spatial needs of users is imperative for the design of livable and sustainable houses. However, the practical and theoretical difficulties associated with this, especially in social housing, create a shortfall in design knowledge known as user needs gap. To bridge this gap, design researchers over the years, have sought to provide feedback for design decision-making through post-occupancy evaluation studies using preferences and residential satisfaction as constructs. In view of their limitations, this study aims to explore residential adaptations as residents’ tacit means of communicating their spatial needs, and a pathway to understanding residents’ housing requirements.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was exploratory in nature and a case study by design using a convergent parallel design within the mixed methods tradition. Activity Theory as used as a conceptual framework. The study involved three strands of research as follows: estimation of the floor areas of the rooms and spaces of the case study designs using the International Standards Organisation intramuros method; a survey of households and their activities using questionnaires; and observation of residents’ adaptations captured photographs and drawings. In all, 43 households out of the 66 apartments in the two case designs were surveyed.

Findings

The study found that while the units were theoretically large, they were practically inadequate when average household sizes were taken into account in a space per person analysis. In response, particularly to sleeping requirements of children, residents make different forms of adaptations – normative, such as house sharing, compositional and organizational, as well as add-ins and add-ons including and illegal alterations.

Originality/value

The paper presents residential adaptations as an empirically grounded, contextually embedded and practically useful means of exploring and understanding users’ spatial needs in housing design. Residential adaptations provide a means through which residents communicate their housing needs, albeit tacitly – a means for self-expression, self-extension and self-determination. To theory, the study shows that residential adaptations can be useful as a construct for understanding residents’ spatial needs, though fuzzy. It also helps understand how the tensions in an activity system, may result from contradictions produced by the lurking effect of contextual factors. This makes contextual knowledge, particularly cultural knowledge, critical to the design.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 December 2020

Terri Peters and Anna Halleran

The COVID-19 global health crisis is undeniably a global housing crisis. Our study focuses on quality of life in urban mid- and high-rise apartment housing, the fastest…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 global health crisis is undeniably a global housing crisis. Our study focuses on quality of life in urban mid- and high-rise apartment housing, the fastest growing housing types in many cities around the world. This housing typology presents unique challenges relating to connection to nature, daylight and fresh air.

Design/methodology/approach

This multi-disciplinary literature review analyzes more than 100 published papers from peer-reviewed sources from environmental psychology, building science and architecture relevant to quality of life in high-rise housing, as well as more than 40 recent newspaper and magazine articles about the possible impacts of COVID-19 on housing. We identify synergies between passive design strategies and health-promoting architecture or “restorative environmental design” principles.

Findings

Post-pandemic, health-promoting apartment housing design must prioritize (1) window placement and views that support stress recovery and restoration; (2) lighting levels based on spaces that can satisfy multiple uses and users; (3) bedrooms designed for restful sleep that contribute to circadian regulation; (4) living rooms with better indoor air quality, with a focus on natural ventilation; (5) access to nature, through the purposeful design of balconies and (6) unit sizes and layouts that enable physical distancing and prevent crowding.

Originality/value

We identify new social and environmental design priorities in the form of evidence-based design principles to inform and promote healthy and restorative living environments for residents in apartment housing.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Chihiro Shimizu, Koji Karato and Kiyohiko Nishimura

The purpose of this article, starting from linear regression, was to estimate a switching regression model, nonparametric model and generalized additive model as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article, starting from linear regression, was to estimate a switching regression model, nonparametric model and generalized additive model as a semi-parametric model, perform function estimation with multiple nonlinear estimation methods and conduct comparative analysis of their predictive accuracy. The theoretical importance of estimating hedonic functions using a nonlinear function form has been pointed out in ample previous research (e.g. Heckman et al. (2010).

Design/methodology/approach

The distinctive features of this study include not only our estimation of multiple nonlinear model function forms but also the method of verifying predictive accuracy. Using out-of-sample testing, we predicted and verified predictive accuracy by performing random sampling 500 times without replacement for 9,682 data items (the same number used in model estimation), based on data for the years before and after the year used for model estimation.

Findings

As a result of estimating multiple models, we believe that when it comes to hedonic function estimation, nonlinear models are superior based on the strength of predictive accuracy viewed in statistical terms and on graphic comparisons. However, when we examined predictive accuracy using out-of-sample testing, we found that the predictive accuracy was inferior to linear models for all nonlinear models.

Research limitations/implications

In terms of the reason why the predictive accuracy was inferior, it is possible that there was an overfitting in the function estimation. Because this research was conducted for a specific period of time, it needs to be developed by expanding it to multiple periods over which the market fluctuates dynamically and conducting further analysis.

Practical implications

Many studies compare predictive accuracy by separating the estimation model and verification model using data at the same point in time. However, when attempting practical application for auto-appraisal systems and the like, it is necessary to estimate a model using past data and make predictions with respect to current transactions. It is possible to apply this study to auto-appraisal systems.

Social implications

It is recognized that housing price fluctuations caused by the subprime crisis had a massive impact on the financial system. The findings of this study are expected to serve as a tool for measuring housing price fluctuation risks in the financial system.

Originality/value

While the importance of nonlinear estimation when estimating hedonic functions has been pointed out in theoretical terms, there is a noticeable lag when it comes to testing based on actual data. Given this, we believe that our verification of nonlinear estimation’s validity using multiple nonlinear models is significant not just from an academic perspective – it may also have practical applications.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2015

Jin-Ann Lin

The balcony, an integral element in modernist housing, can be found in almost every Taipei apartment building. Even so, in Taipei most balconies have been enclosed by…

Abstract

The balcony, an integral element in modernist housing, can be found in almost every Taipei apartment building. Even so, in Taipei most balconies have been enclosed by users of all social classes. This paper looks into the historical context of the enclosed balcony by arguing that the identity and origins of the Taipei balcony are inseparable from the 1960s birth of a modernist housing type—the Taipei walkup.

Balcony provision, governed by building codes inherited from a colonial past, has been incorporated into the system of speculative market housing. For builders, balconies are profitable floor areas that can be promoted as a symbol of modern living; for users, balconies are additional floor space that can be transformed into interior spaces. However, owing to the threefold combination of initial unfamiliarity of apartment buildings, underinvestment in the urban environment, and dire political circumstances, it is the balcony which has borne the brunt of the underdeveloped relationship between public and private life. In the context of this new housing type, the practice of enclosing balconies arose through the complicity of builders and users.

Details

Open House International, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2014

Mary Hardie, Melvyn Green and Yaping He

Heritage housing in inner city areas represents a valuable cultural asset that belongs, in part, to the community as a whole. Despite this, the risk of destruction by fire…

Abstract

Purpose

Heritage housing in inner city areas represents a valuable cultural asset that belongs, in part, to the community as a whole. Despite this, the risk of destruction by fire in closely spaced heritage housing has not received a great deal of research attention. The purpose of this paper is to identify potential faults in building fabric that may result in unacceptable fire safety risks to irreplaceable heritage streetscapes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines a sample of publically administered heritage houses in inner Sydney. A condition survey looks at the occurrence of noted defects, or non-compliances to the current building regulations, in fire separation between attached or closely spaced occupancies.

Findings

Fire spread between adjacent buildings is identified as a potential hazard which needs to be addressed in order to ensure both the sustainability of the remaining heritage housing stock and the safety of the occupants.

Research limitations/implications

While the survey is small, it represents a significant proportion of a dwindling stock of nineteenth century heritage housing in public ownership in Sydney.

Practical implications

Based on the results of the survey, a recommendation has been made in regard to improving building surveying practice when dealing with renovation of heritage housing.

Social implications

Concern over the diminishing availability of social housing in inner city locations indicates the need for more attention to the fire safety of the remaining stock.

Originality/value

The research provides original data on the level of fire safety risk in a regional cluster of heritage housing.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

James A. Wall, Dong‐Won Sohn, Natalie Cleeton and Deng Jian Jin

This study investigated the mediations of 125 community mediators in the People's Republic of China. The mediators' reports on two mediations each—one in a community…

Abstract

This study investigated the mediations of 125 community mediators in the People's Republic of China. The mediators' reports on two mediations each—one in a community (inter‐family) and one in a family (intra‐family) dispute—indicated the frequency with which they used 33 mediation techniques. In family (versus community) mediations, Chinese mediators were found to rely more heavily upon the techniques of separating the parties, getting assistance from third parties, calling for empathy, stating the other side's point of view, and utilizing logic. As for the strategies (combinations of techniques) employed, we found three distinct ones—separate, analyze together, criticize—in the family mediations. Two sets—reason together and criticize—were detected in the community mediations.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2013

Alessandra De Cesaris and Domizia Mandolesi

The home is the place where the intimacy of living is manifested and where relationships with the outside world are formed. The truest sense of domestic space is expressed…

Abstract

The home is the place where the intimacy of living is manifested and where relationships with the outside world are formed. The truest sense of domestic space is expressed in the opposition between the interior dimension and collective aspirations. A society's needs and aspirations are reflected in the transformations of the dwelling, the city's basic unit and constituent element. The history of the dwelling can be read as the history of the relationship between the desire for the self-representation of an interior world and the desire for identification and recognition within a community. These considerations lie at the heart the research conducted by HousingLab - DiAP - Sapienza of Rome with the goal of developing low-cost residential projects that can be customized and tailored to individual needs. To meet the demands of a large and heterogeneous public, these projects must refer to industrial processes for the manufacturing of mass-produced goods. But how is it possible to reconcile industrialization and mass production with the need for individual expression or with the desire to freely give form to a home, modify it, and define its character according to individual tastes and its physical context? The goal is to create a catalogue of a system of a limited number of easy-to-assemble, standardized and prefabricated components that can generate controlled, but extremely varied and flexible, configurations of domestic space in order to accommodate different needs in relationship to individual taste and different locations. This article will present a series of projects designed by HousingLab - DiAP - Sapienza of Rome highlighting the relationship between architectural quality, energy use, environmental and economic sustainability, and innovation.

Details

Open House International, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Chihiro Shimizu, Hideoki Takatsuji, Hiroya Ono and Kiyohiko G. Nishimura

An economic indicator faces two requirements. It should be reported in a timely manner and should not be significantly altered afterward to avoid erroneous messages. At…

Abstract

Purpose

An economic indicator faces two requirements. It should be reported in a timely manner and should not be significantly altered afterward to avoid erroneous messages. At the same time, it should reflect changing market conditions constantly and appropriately. These requirements are particularly challenging for housing price indices, since housing markets are subject to large temporal/seasonal changes and occasional structural changes. The purpose of this paper is to estimate a hedonic price index of condominiums of Tokyo, taking account of seasonal sample selection biases and structural changes in a way it enables us to report the index in a manner which is timely and not subject to change after reporting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes an overlapping‐period hedonic model (OPHM), in which a hedonic price index is calculated every month based on data in the “window” of a year ending this month (this month and previous 11 months). It also estimates standard hedonic housing price indexes under alternative assumptions: no structural change (“structurally restricted”: restricted hedonic model) and different structure for every month (“structurally unrestricted”: unrestricted hedonic model).

Findings

Results suggest that the structure of the housing market, including seasonality, changes over time, and these changes occur continuously over time. It is also demonstrated that structurally restricted indices that do not account for structural changes involve a large time lag compared with indices that do account for structural changes during periods with significant price fluctuations.

Social implications

Following the financial crisis triggered by the US housing market, housing price index guidelines are currently being developed, with the United Nations, International Monetary Fund, and Organization for Economic Co‐operation and Development leading the way. These guidelines recommend that indices be estimated based on the hedonic method. We believe that the hedonic method proposed here will serve as a reference for countries that develop hedonic method‐based housing price indices in future.

Originality/value

In the many studies involving conventional housing price indices, whether those using the repeat‐sales method or hedonic method, there are few that have analyzed the problem of market structural changes. This paper is the first to construct a large database and systematically estimate the effect that changes in market structure have on housing price indices.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

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