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1 – 10 of over 4000
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Jackie Brander Brown and Brenda McDonnell

One recently developed performance measurement method which mayprove more effective for hotel management is that of the “balancedscorecard” – which aims to give…

9595

Abstract

One recently developed performance measurement method which may prove more effective for hotel management is that of the “balanced scorecard” – which aims to give management a “comprehensive but quick” view of their organization′s performance. Investigates whether the “scorecard” may represent a long‐term solution to the “superior performance measurement method” the hotel sector is apparently looking for – or whether it is more likely to be just a short‐term, passing fad?

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 7 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

M. Punniyamoorthy and R. Murali

The purpose of this paper is to create a model called “Balanced score for the balanced score card” and to provide an objective benchmarking indicator for evaluating the…

17051

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to create a model called “Balanced score for the balanced score card” and to provide an objective benchmarking indicator for evaluating the achievement of the strategic goals of the company.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the concepts of “Balanced scorecard” proposed by Robert. S. Kaplan and David P. Norton. This paper also adopts the model given by Brown P.A. and Gibson D.F. and the extension to the model provided by P.V. Raghavan and M. Punniyamoorthy. Preference theory is used to calculate the relative weightage for each factor, using the process of pair wise comparison. The balanced score for balanced scorecard provides a single value by taking into account all the essential objective and subjective factors – be it financial or non‐financial. It also provides a suitable weightages for those parameters. The target performance and the actual performance are compared and the analysis is made.

Findings

Information from a leading organization was obtained and the balanced score for a balance scorecard was calculated for that organization. The variations were analyzed through this model. The depth and objectivity in the analysis is highlighted.

Research limitations/implications

This provides a single bench marking measure to evaluate how far the firm had been successful in achieving the strategies. The paper has adopted the preference theory which limits the weightage to be accorded to the factors concerned. However, further refinement can be provided by the usage of analytic hierarchy process for arriving suitable weightages.

Practical implications

The organization can calculate the balanced score by themselves, by assigning appropriate importance to the activities – as they deem fit. It is a tailor made benchmarking information system created by the firm for itself.

Originality/value

This is of value to the top management to identify the important activities and setting suitable target measures to be achieved in those activities. The variations are arrived by comparing the targeted performance with the actual. This will help the firm to take suitable actions under those parameters where there are significant deviations.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

Bernhard Smandek, Andreas Barthel, Jens Winkler and Peter Ulbig

There is a growing awareness of intellectual property (IP) rights in European public research institutes. Since 2008 a non‐binding recommendation of the European

2569

Abstract

Purpose

There is a growing awareness of intellectual property (IP) rights in European public research institutes. Since 2008 a non‐binding recommendation of the European Commission has been, in effect, proposing a consistent policy for IP in research and development (R&D). While there is a broad consensus on the overall goal – achieving a higher competitiveness of European industry in the international market place – there are, however, conflicting expectations on the micro‐management: are technology transfer agencies to be considered as profit‐centers, cost‐centers, mediators or all of the above? This paper seeks to provide an answer

Design/methodology/approach

The Physikalisch‐Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is the national metrology institute of Germany with 1,900 employees and an annual budget of €145 million. It has established a micro‐management policy for IP rights, which is successfully fostering the development of modern instrumentation for metrology and may serve as an example for other public institutions as well. While it is obliged by law to operate as a regular market participant when licensing patents, there are additional conditions, some with the status of a law or a binding government decision as well.

Findings

The BSC approach, implemented at PTB, provides guidelines to reconcile seemingly conflicting requirements for a public entity while at the same time generating economic benefits in terms of additional income from licensing. In the authors' opinion this approach keeps costs at a reasonable level, fosters inventors' motivation and furnishes data for decisions for the technology transfer office as well as for the leadership of the institution.

Originality/value

To manage this conflict of goals the authors developed and implemented a balanced score card (BSC) system for IP management in order to optimize licensing income generation, cut costs, keep the inventor's motivation high and simultaneously realize macro‐economic technology transfer tasks. The BSC was originally introduced for the private sector by Norton and Kaplan in 1992, in response to a failure of purely monitoring financial indicators. The balanced score card considers economic and non‐economic factors, often denoted as “soft”. It is balanced with respect to result‐oriented indicators, like licensing income, and with respect to process‐oriented indicators, like the acceptance rate of inventions for patenting. And it tries to deduce from a trend of an indicator in the past a prediction of future development, associated with recommendations for actions to influence the ongoing process. The paper discusses the issues.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Ibrahim M. Awad and Alaa A. Amro

The purpose of this paper is to map the cluster in the leather and shoes sector for improving the competitiveness of the firms. Toward this end, the study is organized to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to map the cluster in the leather and shoes sector for improving the competitiveness of the firms. Toward this end, the study is organized to examine the impact of clustering on competitiveness improvement. The influence of competitive elements and performance (Porter’s diamond) and balanced score card was utilized.

Design/methodology/approach

A random sample of 131 respondents was chosen during the period from May 2016 to July 2016. A structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis was applied to investigate the research model. This approach was chosen because of its ability to test casual relationships between constructs with multiple measurement items. Researchers proposed a two-stage model-building process for applying SEM. The measurement model was first examined for instrument validation, followed by an analysis of the structural model for testing associations hypothesized by the research model.

Findings

The main findings show that there is a unidirectional causal relationship between improvements of performance and achieve competitiveness and also reveal that the Palestinian shoes and leather cluster sector is vital and strong, and conclude that clustering can achieve competitiveness for small- and medium-sized enterprises.

Research limitations/implications

Future research can examine the relationship between clustering and innovation. The effect of clustering using other clustering models other than Porter’s model is advised to be used for future research.

Practical implications

The relationships among clustering and competitiveness may provide a practical clue to both, policymakers and researchers on how cluster enhances economic firms such as a skilled workforce, research, development capacity, and infrastructure. This is likely to create assets such as trust, synergy, collaboration and cooperation for improved competitiveness.

Originality/value

The findings of this study provide background information that can simultaneously be used to analyze relationships among factors of innovation, customer’s satisfaction, internal business and financial performance. This study also identified several essential factors in successful firms, and discussed the implications of these factors for developing organizational strategies to encourage and foster competitiveness.

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Dilanthi Amaratunga, Richard Haigh, Marjan Sarshar and David Baldry

This paper discusses the application of the balanced scorecard (BSC) concept as a widely used management framework for optimal measurement of organisational performance…

8282

Abstract

This paper discusses the application of the balanced scorecard (BSC) concept as a widely used management framework for optimal measurement of organisational performance within NHS facilities directorates and discusses the fundamental points to cover in its implementation. Thereby, the paper identifies this framework as a strategic measurement and management system for facilities management. BSC formulation within NHS estates and facilities is described as a case study based on a facilities directorate situated in the north west of England, and discussion covers its implementation procedures, evaluation standards and reporting process. The paper further establishes the conceptual framework for performance management for the facilities directorate, as well as consistent techniques useful in undertaking the performance management administration and system oversight functions.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 May 2009

Meena Chavan

The purpose of this paper is to focus on one strategy known as “The Balanced Scorecard”, discussing the growing importance of balanced scorecard performance systems…

45783

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on one strategy known as “The Balanced Scorecard”, discussing the growing importance of balanced scorecard performance systems, exploring issues that organizations face in building and implementing scorecard systems, and sharing lessons learned from Australian organizations that have taken the balanced scorecard journey.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken is the case study methodology to depict the real world examples of organisations that have confidence in the “Balanced scorecard performance system“ so that other organisations can follow suit.

Findings

The paper concludes that the balanced scorecard approach may require some substantial changes in culture within the organization.. The balanced scorecard requires understanding, commitment and support from the very top of the business down. The balanced scorecard will evolve. As culture changes and develops to accept the new approach and members of the organisation mature within the new culture, the organisation will find new things to measure, new goals in different areas, to make the balanced scorecard even more balanced and effective in supporting a living, growing, viable organisation. Different organisations have quite different needs, market areas, people, products and services, and will end up with significantly different balanced scorecards.

Research limitations/implications

The outcomes were based on two multinational corporations and may differ with small and medium enterprises.

Practical implications

The balanced scorecard is balanced in another dimension – not just a balance of measures of essential areas of the business, but also a balance of goals versus accountability. If people do not accept accountability for achievement of the balanced measures and goals of the balanced scorecard, there is no balanced scorecard. The people of the organisation are the key to the success of the balanced scorecard system.

Originality/value

The paper specifically looks at the implementation of the “Balanced Score Card Performance Management System” in Australian corporations.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Ravi Arora

In today’s fast changing and non‐linear business environment the only way to gain competitive advantage is by managing intellectual capital, which is more commonly known…

11086

Abstract

In today’s fast changing and non‐linear business environment the only way to gain competitive advantage is by managing intellectual capital, which is more commonly known as knowledge management (KM). There are basically three broad objectives of KM: leveraging the organisation’s knowledge; creating new knowledge or promoting innovation; and increasing collaboration and hence enhancing the skill level of employees. The most common KM programme involves development of a knowledge repository, and forming and nurturing of the communities of practice. These two, jointly, address all the three objectives of KM. Many organisations are embracing KM but few of them are able to implement it successfully to see the benefits. Implementation of KM is a strategic process and needs careful target setting and review. Organisations, which use balanced scorecard for strategy deployment, can effectively implement KM in their organisation by developing and deploying a KM index.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 January 2014

Mike Perkins, Anna Grey and Helge Remmers

The balanced scorecard (BSC), first created by Kaplan and Norton in 1992, has been developed over the last 20 years, resulting in numerous iterations. There is currently…

13136

Abstract

Purpose

The balanced scorecard (BSC), first created by Kaplan and Norton in 1992, has been developed over the last 20 years, resulting in numerous iterations. There is currently no agreed taxonomy for these iterations, making comparison of research findings difficult. The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework for describing the different iterations.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to assist in understanding the numerous changes, the concept of revision control was introduced. A full review of the literature describing new iterations of the BSC was undertaken and these iterations were classified as minor developments or major generational evolution.

Findings

Eight subsets of the Balanced Score card are proposed, grouped into three generations; the first being the initial generation of score card, the second generation including strategy maps, and the final generation which includes destination statements.

Practical implications

It is planned that this simple classification will prove useful to practitioners, for describing which generation of the scorecard they propose to implement, and for academics to describe more precisely the scorecard that they are analysing.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to provide a taxonomy for the different versions of the BSC, through a process of identifying and labelling the major and minor changes that have occurred. This allows a more nuanced analysis of the BSC as a tool for managing performance and adding precision to any critique, in that it is clear which version has been used.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 63 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 June 2019

Shruti J. Raval, Ravi Kant and Ravi Shankar

The purpose of this paper is to develop the balance score card (BSC) approach based Lean Six Sigma (LSS) performance measurement system and investigate the critical…

2233

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop the balance score card (BSC) approach based Lean Six Sigma (LSS) performance measurement system and investigate the critical measures currently practiced by Indian manufacturing organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

This study offers insights of LSS performance measurement from manufacturing industry. Initially, the BSC-based framework is developed to recognize the adoption of LSS performance measures. Then, the framework is applied to nine Indian manufacturing organizations to assess the LSS performance measure practice.

Findings

The BSC-based framework of LSS performance evaluation for manufacturing industry is formulated. Then, adoption of these LSS performance measures is investigated with nine Indian manufacturing organizations. The result indicates significant variability in terms of practicing level of LSS measures. However, the majority of organizations are more sensitive to the customer perspectives.

Practical implications

This study reveals a background as to why the performance measurement is required for the success of LSS and for providing practical guidelines for designing performance metrics. The framework interrelates and captures various LSS perspectives and indicator measures, and furnishes a comprehensive outlook of the organization for strategic analysis. This study provides BSC-based template for performing the benchmarking study. This analysis may serve as a reference point for manufacturing organization to determine their system weaknesses, and assist them to concentrate on their most vital and suitable criteria and objectives. However, the analysis contributes to the knowledge on LSS performance measurement system and catches differences in theory and practice, paving the approach to newer research.

Originality/value

This study renders an industry-oriented LSS performance measurement practical approach and suggests the easily adopted vital performance measures for different manufacturing organizations.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Irena Rodov and Philippe Leliaert

Today’s measurement systems fail to adequately account for intellectual capital (IC) in a transparent yet comprehensive manner. In spite of many recent attempts to qualify…

8507

Abstract

Today’s measurement systems fail to adequately account for intellectual capital (IC) in a transparent yet comprehensive manner. In spite of many recent attempts to qualify and sometimes quantify intangibles, there exists as yet not one standardized system that is sufficiently developed and globally accepted. The aim of the present paper is to contribute towards the creation of such a system. The financial method of intangible assets measurement (FiMIAM) presented in this paper aims to overcome some of the weaknesses of recent methods of IC valuation, and contribute to the creation of complete balance‐sheets, reflecting both the tangible and intangible assets of a company.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 4000