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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Chun Wang, Baiyi Li, Baizhan Li and Andrew Baldwin

The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed case study on the methods and organisational structure used for controlling the time schedule for a large and complex…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed case study on the methods and organisational structure used for controlling the time schedule for a large and complex project. The paper discusses the use of “project controlling”, a term used to describe project control by a third-party organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers used action research to collect data for the case study. A member of the research team was a “participant-observer” on the project on a day-to-day basis for a period of 18 months collecting and analysing data which were subsequently analysed by a mixed methods approach.

Findings

The use of a “Project Controlling Unit” operated by an independent adviser organisation has significant advantages over traditional methods. It can provide timely, consolidated, independent guidance to the client and assistance to other participating organisations.

Research limitations/implications

The research has confirmed the effectiveness of the method on the project under study.

Practical implications

The findings provide guidance for enhanced project control on large complex infrastructural projects that will be of interest to other researchers, other clients and other construction organisations both within China and internationally.

Social implications

Organisations that seek to develop Project Controlling Units to implement the methods described in this paper will need to review their recruitment and training strategies to ensure that appropriate and experienced staffs are engaged.

Originality/value

The paper extends the knowledge relating to “project controlling” method. The findings provide additional insights to progress reporting and the management of construction production on HOPSCA and other large infrastructural projects.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Paul Roelofsen

One of the fundamental human requirements is a working environment that allows people to perform their work optimally under comfortable conditions. Given that buildings…

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9790

Abstract

One of the fundamental human requirements is a working environment that allows people to perform their work optimally under comfortable conditions. Given that buildings and air conditioning systems are designed on the basis of a certain level of discomfort, this raises the key question ‘What is the effect of the level of comfort on the productivity of people working in office environments?’ The purpose of this paper is to quantify this relationship as an aid to making choices regarding the working environment at strategic level within the facilities management process, with particular emphasis on thermal conditions.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Baizhan Li, Meng Liu and Keith McKinnell

The purpose of this paper is to trace the heavy reliance of coal as an energy source in the city of Chongqing and the serious impact this has had on the air quality…

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1360

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to trace the heavy reliance of coal as an energy source in the city of Chongqing and the serious impact this has had on the air quality together with the municipal authority's responses.

Design/methodology/approach

It provides a factual description of the coal centred strategy and the heavy reliance on secondary industry output to fuel Chongqing's growth which has in turn brought about air pollution and acid rain.

Findings

The authorities are now responding through a number of new policies targeting the use of clean energy and renewable energy resources and improving energy efficiency which has already started to have positive results.

Originality/value

The paper provides a good practical guide to the current situation of energy consumption and policy implications for combating serious air quality issues in one of China's major urban centres.

Details

Property Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Baizhan Li, Meng Liu and K.G. McKinnell

The purpose of this paper is to trace the connection between China's growth and urbanization processes and the amount of building space that is being constructed.

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1545

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to trace the connection between China's growth and urbanization processes and the amount of building space that is being constructed.

Design/methodology/approach

Buildings consume energy and are not always built with subsequent efficient use of energy in mind. China's building industry is estimated to account for over a quarter of the total energy consumed in China.

Findings

Such a massive use of the energy resource has prompted China's authorities to consider policies that will promote greater building energy efficiency.

Originality/value

The paper provides an important update as to how China is addressing energy efficiency in one of its key industrial sectors.

Details

Property Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Andrew Smith and Michael Pitt

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the indoor environmental quality benefits of plants in offices by undertaking trials using live plants.

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2800

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the indoor environmental quality benefits of plants in offices by undertaking trials using live plants.

Design/methodology/approach

Using two offices in the same building, one with plants and one as a control, daily tests were undertaken for relative humidity, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Results were analysed to identify any differences between the office with plants and the one without.

Findings

Relative humidity increased following the introduction of plants and more significantly following additional hydroculture plants being installed, taking it to within the recommended range. Carbon dioxide was slightly higher in the planted office for the majority of the trial, although there was an overall reduction in both offices. Carbon monoxide levels reduced with the introduction of plants and again with the additional plants. VOC levels were consistently lower in the non‐planted office.

Research limitations/implications

It would be useful to extend this research in a greater range of buildings and with more flexible VOC‐monitoring equipment.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that plants may provide an effective method of regulating the indoor environmental conditions within buildings. This can potentially lead to performance gains for the organisation and a reduction in instances of ill health among the workforce.

Originality/value

The majority of previous studies have relied on laboratory work and experimental chambers. This research aims to apply previous findings to a real working environment to determine whether the air‐purifying abilities of plants have practical relevance in the workplace.

Details

Facilities, vol. 29 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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