Search results

1 – 10 of 851
Article
Publication date: 30 March 2021

Ting-Hsiang Tseng, Nga Cheng Chan, Matthew Tingchi Liu and Chieh-Yu Lin

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of brand origin (BO) misperception (hereafter BOM) or non-identification on brand equity. Besides, the current study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of brand origin (BO) misperception (hereafter BOM) or non-identification on brand equity. Besides, the current study investigates the moderating role of brand strength in the relationship between BOM and brand equity.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study adopted a 4 (BO identification: favorable BOM vs adverse BOM vs non-identification vs correct identification) × 2 (brand strength: strong vs weak) between-subjects design. A total number of 547 participants performed assessments on the automotive brand. The current study selected three strong brands and three weak brands for tests. In the experiment, respondents had to associate the brand with its country of origin. The assignment of BO conditions was based upon respondents' natural responses provided. ANOVA was used for data analysis.

Findings

The results indicate that as compared to correct BO identification, BOM (either adverse or favorable) or non-identification exerts a more negative impact on brand equity. Moreover, the study demonstrates that brand strength moderates the effect of perceived BO on brand equity.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical support to the notion that BOM is detrimental to brand equity. Specifically, when adverse BOM occurs, a strong brand suffers more from the negative consequences resulted than a weak brand does. Conversely, when consumers misattribute the BO to a country with a stronger image than its real origin (i.e. favorable BOM), the resulting negative effect is reversed. Moreover, the non-identification of BO hurts the brand equity of both strong and weak brands.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Kittipong Suweero, Wutthipong Moungnoi and Chotchai Charoenngam

Building operation and maintenance (BOM) services are important activities for highly competitive businesses. In addition, outsourcing decision factors are key to the…

Abstract

Purpose

Building operation and maintenance (BOM) services are important activities for highly competitive businesses. In addition, outsourcing decision factors are key to the effectiveness of BOM. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to identify and prioritize the decision factors that affect outsourcing decision factors for BOM services, to elicit the different perceptions of each managerial group (shopping centers, hotels, and hospitals), and to categorize the important outsourced BOM decision factors.

Design/methodology/approach

On the basis of the literature review, the authors observed that there are 56 outsourcing decision factors in six groups. The survey included 105 of the largest and most competitive companies in Bangkok, Thailand. The statistical methods applied were the relative importance index (RII), t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and factor analysis (FA).

Findings

The findings show that the three participant groups are different in some respects, as shown by their RII values. After ranking the RII values, the top 15 factors for each participant group were used to compare the participant groups using the t-test and one-way ANOVA, which confirmed their respective similarities and differences. Through an FA, the top reasons that each business outsourced BOM services were grouped into major categories.

Originality/value

The results of this research will not only facilitate an understanding of the related decision factors used by each particular business in the commercial sector but will also assist outsourcing companies in identifying and improving support services for businesses.

Details

Property Management, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Jun Du, Yuan‐Yuan Jiao and Jianxin Jiao

Traditional production management systems are often designed to support manufacturing based on a limited number of product variants. With the emerging trend of producing…

1766

Abstract

Purpose

Traditional production management systems are often designed to support manufacturing based on a limited number of product variants. With the emerging trend of producing customized products to meet diverse customer needs, the number of product variants increases exponentially in mass customization. In a situation of assembly‐to‐order production, production planning and control involve not only product variety, but also process variety. It is imperative to synchronize product and process variety in a coherent manner.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses integrated product and production data management for assembly‐to‐order production. An integrated BOM and routing generator is proposed for the purpose of unifying BOM and assembly‐planning data in order to accommodate a wide range of product variability and production variations.

Findings

An integrated BOM and routing generator excels in variety synchronization for assembly‐to‐order production planning.

Research limitations/implications

Variety synchronization opens many opportunities for research into mass customization production. It is important to deal with not only the results of high variety production but also the causes of process variations.

Practical implications

The proposed methodology is applicable to manage high variety production like mass customization.

Originality/value

The paper proposes the variety synchronization issue in mass customization. An object‐oriented methodology is applied to manage variety of BOMs and variety of routings.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Surajit Ghosh Dastidar

The learning outcomes are as follows: to understand the different options available for funding; to illustrate the growth of the food services industry in India; and to…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes are as follows: to understand the different options available for funding; to illustrate the growth of the food services industry in India; and to understand a business model canvas.

Case overview/synopsis

Baromeeter (BOM), was a Delhi-based startup founded in the year 2016 by Rishabh Vyas, a 26-year-old MBA graduate. Currently, BOM has operations in Delhi-NCR with 50,000 monthly website visitors and 200-plus partner restaurants and cafes in Delhi-NCR with brands such as Imperfecto, Junkyard Café, Garam Dharam, Out of the Box, Boombox, Jungle Jamboree and many more. BOM also receives over 1,000 deal bookings and 200 plus party bookings monthly. Going forward, Rishabh has plans to expand to other cities such as Mumbai, Hyderabad, Pune and Bangalore. However, there are certain challenges. So far, the startup has raised funds from friends and families. He was confident that he had a compelling product. However, he knew he had to look for fresh investments to scale up. The existing funds may sustain the operations of the company for another six months. Rishabh was considering a number of options. However, whom to approach? Would banks be interested in lending money? How about participating in angel investor’s meet?

Complexity academic level

The case is suitable for a course in graduate and an undergraduate course in entrepreneurship. The case can be used to understand the business model canvas and to understand the funding options available for startups.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Chung‐Hsing Yeh

An effective production planning and control system requirescombining the bill of material (BOM) and routeing data to reflect thematerial flow through the production…

1126

Abstract

An effective production planning and control system requires combining the bill of material (BOM) and routeing data to reflect the material flow through the production process. Presents an integrated BOM and routeing data model which allows flexibility in handling relationships between materials and operations to suit specific needs. It can also be used as a standard data resource for creating production jobs. Maintaining job data independently of the BOM and routeing data allows the system to accommodate a wide range of production variations in practice. In a make‐to‐order environment, jobs are created for making line items on customer orders. To manage customer orders better, develops an extended job model to allow line items of a customer order to be made by one job. Perceives the concept of the extended job model as having considerable value in a wide range of production applications.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 15 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

409

Abstract

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 74 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 April 2003

Gil‐Sang Jang and Jung‐Sang Choi

This paper proposes an efficient and effective BOM management scheme for small and medium manufacturing (SME) companies that produce automobile parts. Automobile part’s…

Abstract

This paper proposes an efficient and effective BOM management scheme for small and medium manufacturing (SME) companies that produce automobile parts. Automobile part’s manufacturers produce very various products due to various automobile characteristics such as types, colors, and options of cars. These products are classified into product groups with common pars and like this product groups with commonality are regarded as product family. This paper proposes a BOM data model for product family structures and implements the practical EXCEL‐based BOM management system for real small and medium manufacturing (SME) companies that produces automobile parts.

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2012

Keryn Chalmers, Jayne M. Godfrey and Barbara Lynch

Accounting and water industry experts are developing general‐purpose water accounting (GPWA) to report information about water and rights to water. The system has the…

5573

Abstract

Purpose

Accounting and water industry experts are developing general‐purpose water accounting (GPWA) to report information about water and rights to water. The system has the potential to affect water policies, pricing and management, and investment and other decisions that are affected by GPWA report users' understanding of water risks faced by an entity. It may also affect financial returns to accounting and auditing firms and firms in water industries. In this paper the authors aim to examine the roles of the accounting profession, water industries and other stakeholders in governing GPWA. Recognising that the fate of GPWA depends partly upon regulatory power and economics, they seek to apply regulatory theories that explain financial accounting standards development to speculate about the national and international future of GPWA.

Design/methodology/approach

Official documents, internal Water Accounting Standards Board documents and unstructured interviews underpin the authors' analysis.

Findings

The authors speculate about the benefits that might accrue to various stakeholder groups from capturing the GPWA standard‐setting process. They also suggest that internationally, water industries may dominate early GPWA standards development in the public interest and that regulatory capture by accounting or water industry professionals will not necessarily conflict with public interest benefits.

Practical implications

Accounting for water can affect allocations of environmental, economic, social and other resources; also, accounting and water industry professional standing and revenues. In this paper the authors identify factors influencing GPWA standards and standard‐setting institutional arrangements, and thereby these resource allocations. The paper generates an awareness of GPWA's emergence and practical implications.

Originality/value

This is an early study to investigate water accounting standard‐setting regulatory influences and their impact.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Salim Darmadi

The purpose of the present paper is to examine the influence of the educational qualifications of board members, including the CEO, on the financial performance of…

3076

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present paper is to examine the influence of the educational qualifications of board members, including the CEO, on the financial performance of Indonesian listed firms. Indonesia is a developing economy that adopts a two‐tier board system.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a sample comprising 160 firms listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX). Tobin's Q and return on assets (ROA) are used as measures of financial performance. It uses four proxies for board members' educational qualifications, namely postgraduate degrees, degrees obtained from prestigious universities, degrees obtained from developed countries, and degrees in financial disciplines. Regressions are performed separately for the supervisory board, management board, and CEO.

Findings

This study provides empirical evidence that the educational qualifications of board members and the CEO matter, to a particular extent, in explaining either ROA or Tobin's Q. For example, CEOs holding degrees from prestigious domestic universities perform significantly better than those without such qualifications.

Practical implications

Even though intellectual competence should appear to be one of the considerations in the appointment of board members, educational qualification is not always a good proxy for superior advising or managerial quality. There may be many other factors that need to be considered, such as experiences, managerial skills, networks, and other skills obtained outside schools. As such, the establishment of a nomination committee, which is expected to provide independent recommendations on qualified candidates to serve in the boardrooms, plays an important role.

Originality/value

Empirical studies focusing on the influence of the educational backgrounds of board members and the CEO on financial performance are still rare in the literature. This study is among the first to address such an issue in the context of a developing economy.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Maria Christofi, Miguel Nunes, Guo Chao Peng and Angela Lin

ERP systems are not the exclusive concern of large companies anymore. More and more small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) are now engaging with the implementation and…

1715

Abstract

Purpose

ERP systems are not the exclusive concern of large companies anymore. More and more small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) are now engaging with the implementation and exploitation of this type of system. However, reports of ERP failure are numerous and frequent. Very often, this failure results from technical and implementation problems. But even more frequently, it is due to lack of preparation, by the companies themselves, for the implementation process. The purpose of the study reported in this paper was to identify and explore ways in which SMEs may need to prepare themselves before implementing ERP systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The research took a Cypriot SME as a case study and adopted an inductive approach supported by in-depth interviews as the main method of data collection. The qualitative data collected were analysed by using a thematic analysis approach. Subsequently, a rich picture and concept maps were used to represent the findings generated.

Findings

The study identified that business deficiencies and problems, which can impact potential ERP adoption and usage in SMEs, can be localised across business processes boundaries, such as sales order processing, stock control, and bill of materials management, etc. These business problems were found to be attributed to a variety of organisational, technical and human-related reasons. Therefore, this study established that in order to implement ERPs successfully, organisations may require changes in people's work practices and understanding of technology, ownership and control of business processes, as well as organisational wide policies.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the knowledge of ERP preparation and business process improvement in SMEs.

Practical implications

The findings of the paper provide useful insights for both academic and practitioners who are thinking of implementing ERP systems. The paper contributes to the body of literature on issues that SMEs may need to reflect upon before embarking in a costly and resource intensive process of ERP implementation.

Originality/value

Business process improvement is traditionally considered as the result of an ERP project phase. This is how the large majority of the academic literature and the totality of marketing information by ERP vendors portray it. In fact, the reality of practice shows a different scenario with frequent reports of failure and inadequate ERP implementation. This paper aims at breaking with this myth, by proposing that ERPs cannot resolve the large variety of deficient business processes and internal problems that may exist in SMEs. Therefore, this study argues that SMEs need to prepare in advance by engaging in business process reviews prior to the ERP implementation that is engaging in a pre-implementation or preparation phase.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

1 – 10 of 851