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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Gayle C. Avery and Harald Bergsteiner

This BMW case aims to show how many of the company's practices that accord with principles espoused in the authors' sustainable leadership model contributed to its

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13324

Abstract

Purpose

This BMW case aims to show how many of the company's practices that accord with principles espoused in the authors' sustainable leadership model contributed to its recovery after the global financial crisis (GFC).

Design/methodology/approach

This case illustrates how BMW institutes the 23 honeybee leadership principles and practices described in the authors' 2011 article “Sustainable leadership: practices for enhancing business resilience and performance” in Strategy & Leadership.

Findings

The examples provide a glimpse into the honeybee practices that enabled one firm to emerge successfully from the GFC. Regarding the five performance outcomes on the sustainable leadership pyramid, BMW clearly exceeded expectations in 2010 on financial returns and shareholder value.

Practical implications

Clearly BMW provides long‐term value for all its stakeholders – suppliers, shareholders, employees and customers – as is expected of a sustainable enterprise. BMW's business model, innovative approach to problem‐solving and adherence to sustainable leadership practices underpin a capacity to survive crises such as the GFC.

Originality/value

This is a rare case study of corporate‐wide sustainability practices and principles in operation. Informed by the examples of best practices at BMW, managers at other companies can envision how honeybee management might be implemented at their firm.

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2014

Ludger Pries and Martin Seeliger

Make a contribution on company business models and typical reactions to economic crises.

Abstract

Purpose

Make a contribution on company business models and typical reactions to economic crises.

Design/methodology/approach

Media-analysis-based case study.

Findings

Crisis is handled through drawing on a strategy deriving from the typical features of the company; through the crisis these features are even intensified.

Research limitations/implications

Multinational companies are complex and only transparent to a small degree; the empirical data therefore rests on a database with articles.

Social implications

Social implications can be seen at the BMW as a functioning example for social partnership as a form of economic embeddedness at the societal level.

Details

Production, Consumption, Business and the Economy: Structural Ideals and Moral Realities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-055-1

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Javeed Ahamed Golandaj and Karabasappa Gadigeppa Kallihal

Enormous amount of biomedical wastes (BMW) produced everyday across the world. Management of BMW depends on adherence to protocol. BMW management at generation point…

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1129

Abstract

Purpose

Enormous amount of biomedical wastes (BMW) produced everyday across the world. Management of BMW depends on adherence to protocol. BMW management at generation point, definitely, depends upon the awareness, attitudes and practises of health-care staff, the purpose of this study will assess the awareness, attitude and practise regarding different aspects of BMW.

Design/methodology/approach

An observational with appropriate checklists, and a cross-sectional study, involving questionnaires, was conducted during 7-24 January 2016. The existing system of BMW management, funds, resources, etc., knowledge, attitude and practises about BMW were assessed amongst 273 health-care workers in selected public health-care institutes of Karnataka.

Findings

Of 273 study participants, majority (54%) of them have not received any training pertaining to BMW. The results showed a poor level of knowledge and awareness of BMW management amongst health-care personnel. Merely, 43% of the participants correctly knew the categorization of BMW and its disposal in proper colour-coded bins/bags. Awareness is very poor amongst the lower age group, male participants, lab-technicians/pharmacists and supporting staff. Doctors were good at theoretical knowledge such as rules, legislation and public-health importance of BMW management than the practical aspects such as categorization and colour-coding. Further, the attitude of health-care staff is favourable about BMW. Immunization for hepatitis-B was very poor amongst waste handlers (43%).

Originality/value

As the awareness and practise regarding BMW management were poor across different health-care staff there is a need to conduct periodic training and regular monitoring with special focus on the proper use of personal protective equipment. Further, precautionary immunization should be provided, especially waste handlers and sanitary workers.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2632-279X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2020

Prasanna Kumar Kukkamalla, Andrea Bikfalvi and Anna Arbussa

The car no longer serves simply as a means of transport but is at the core of a new concept of mobility. Car manufacturers are seizing opportunities to change the…

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10510

Abstract

Purpose

The car no longer serves simply as a means of transport but is at the core of a new concept of mobility. Car manufacturers are seizing opportunities to change the traditional business model of the auto business. Innovation in this business model has become vital to survival in today’s dynamic market conditions. This paper aims to find out what factors motivate and drive business model change and what the resulting business model innovation is.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study is based on a single case, namely, BMW as an illustrative example of an advanced, highly innovative customer-centric service business model (BM). The study adopts a document analysis method to reveal the firm’s BMI process.

Findings

First, the study presents a conceptual framework for business model change with the factors –motivators and drivers – that impact on the process of change. BMW’s BMI and its impacting factors are discussed based on this model. The McKinsey 7 s Model framework, the elements of which are strategy, structure, systems, shared values, style, staff and skills is used as an analytical tool to discuss new business model implementation. The study highlights the BM configuration of a traditional car manufacturer, the car as a product and the new car as a service concept.

Originality/value

This study reveals the BMI of BMW’s digital services and its key motivators and drivers. BMW mostly innovates in three key dimensions of the Business model. These are value creation, value delivery and value capture. Most of the elements in these dimensions are innovated.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

D.J. Smith

Strategic alliances are an important feature of the aerospace industry and many studies have sought to evaluate their performance. Most have taken a policy perspective…

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6803

Abstract

Strategic alliances are an important feature of the aerospace industry and many studies have sought to evaluate their performance. Most have taken a policy perspective exploring the economic and political benefits claimed for collaboration of this type. The perspective is a reflection of the political origins of many aerospace alliances. This study seeks to evaluate, from a managerial perspective, one of the newer alliances established on a strictly commercial basis. It focuses on BMW Rolls‐Royce GmbH, one of a small number of truly European alliances. The study concludes that, although Rolls‐Royce bought out its German partner after a decade of operation, the alliance was a success. The two engines developed by the alliance over this period were a technical success, overall sales were well on target and the alliance was about to break even. In addition, the study concludes that the alliance formed a key element in Rolls‐Royce’s successful strategy to extend its product portfolio, a strategy that elevated the company to second place in the global aero engine market.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

John Mortimer

Describes how BMW is investing in new body‐in‐white capital equipment to make a new version of the Mini due out in 2007.

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3047

Abstract

Purpose

Describes how BMW is investing in new body‐in‐white capital equipment to make a new version of the Mini due out in 2007.

Design/methodology/approach

Describes the major production line technologies that are under close scrutiny to manufacture the body shell of the next generation Mini car at BMW Group's Oxford plant in the UK. Technologies to be implemented include a further 160 KUKA robots (most of which will be used for spot welding) and a new generation of control software.

Findings

BMW managers and engineers have decided to expand the present body‐in‐white facility at Oxford by a further 15,000m2. At the same time they are planning to move some of the present manufacture to the company's plant at Swindon, Wiltshire. This includes various cells to manufacture closures, including doors, tailgate and bonnet assemblies. Already the Cabriolet tailgate assembly has been moved to Swindon. At the same time, engineers plan to introduce a new control standard, product line 2 (PL2), which is already the standard used throughout BMW's manufacturing organization.

Research limitations/implications

Engineers BMW's oxford plant have been upgrading the present r50 control standard into a hybrid version that will be known as R50.1. This work is due to be complete by the end of this year. The new standard, PL2, will be introduced into the new facilities so there will in effect be two standards running in parallel in the works. At the same time the there will be a switch to Siemens S7 software, which will be faster and offer much increased processing power. Following development and work arising out of previous experience, BMW engineers have opted for KUKA KRC2 robots.

Practical implications

The practical implications of the new facilities will allow BMW engineers greater flexibility. Although it has not yet been made public, it is likely the company will introduce a special framing unit that will allow manufacturing engineers to produce more than one version of the mini on the body‐in‐white line.

Originality/value

The work being done at Oxford for the 2007 Mini will incorporate technology and know‐how already developed within the BMW Group to manufacture the 1‐Series and the 3‐Series cars.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

D. Mark Austin and Patricia Gagné

Drawing on ethnographic data collected over a 9-year period, from 1998 through 2006, we examine the foundations of community among a non-geographic, mobile, identity-based…

Abstract

Drawing on ethnographic data collected over a 9-year period, from 1998 through 2006, we examine the foundations of community among a non-geographic, mobile, identity-based community of touring motorcyclists. Although traditionally oriented geographic communities continue to exist, the literature shows a growing trend toward non-geographic, identity-based communities, whose cohesiveness is based on collective identity, in-group/out-group boundaries, shared values, and symbols. Our focus on a mobile identity-based community contributes to this literature by examining a collectivity that is not only non-geographically situated, but is also based on a strong value placed on travel. Within the touring BMW motorcycling community, we found a strong collective identity that was founded on the shared values of adventure touring; long-distance, all weather endurance riding; proficient, and highly skilled riding; and safety. Our findings contribute to the literature on identity-based communities by demonstrating the salience of ritualized interaction that rewards those who conform to (or excel at) group values and reinforces the sense of collective identity that exists among this dispersed, mobile community. Additionally, our research demonstrates that a recreational subculture can provide some of the traditional benefits of community without many of the demands present in the more comprehensive forms of community.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-931-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

BMW’s training department, known as the Center for Development, has been undergoing a quiet revolution over the past three years. When the center bought a new…

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1481

Abstract

BMW’s training department, known as the Center for Development, has been undergoing a quiet revolution over the past three years. When the center bought a new training‐administration system in 1998, there were 90,000 records to be transferred. The system, John Matchett Ltd’s Registrar, has since grown to incorporate many parts of the business. With two BMW subsidiaries also buying the system and adopting the data dictionaries designed by BMW (GB), Registrar is now used by more than 50 people at BMW (GB) and is available on BMW’s InfoNet internet site. In total, more than 196,000 registration records are managed by these systems.

Details

Training Strategies for Tomorrow, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1369-7234

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

For many BMW drivers, owning a BMW is about much more than merely owning a form of transport. The BMW name has become a symbol of quality, efficiency and engineering…

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4321

Abstract

For many BMW drivers, owning a BMW is about much more than merely owning a form of transport. The BMW name has become a symbol of quality, efficiency and engineering expertise which has inspired a loyal customer base throughout the world. BMW’s long‐standing marketing message has been simply “the ultimate driving machine”.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2007

John Mortimer

The purpose of this paper is to describe how BMW in the UK has put together a production “triangle” that brings together three of its four manufacturing plants in Britain…

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16158

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how BMW in the UK has put together a production “triangle” that brings together three of its four manufacturing plants in Britain to produce the latest version of the Mini passenger car.

Design/methodology/approach

Describes the major production line techniques that are used in the manufacture of the body‐in‐white (BIW) structure as well as the functions of painting and final assembly of the vehicle. The BIW techniques include logistics, spot‐welding and adhesives, as well as optical and laser inspection.

Findings

Over the space of the last three or four years, the management of BMW Group has come to realize the importance of integrating three of its four manufacturing units in the UK with purpose of achieving greater utilization of its existing capacity, and improving productivity.

Research limitations/implications

The BMW Group continually assesses all of the functions involved in the manufacture of a motor vehicle, and in this context is working both with its own plants as well as with suppliers of equipment and components to enhance production and quality processes. This includes all of the processes of joining steel and other materials using spot welding and adhesives. There is also much to be gained from the interchange of information between the various plants in the group worldwide with a view to implementing continuous improvement. The benefits achieved from one process in one particular plant are quickly communicated to other facilities, again with the object of improving quality and productivity.

Practical implications

It is likely that arising out of greater plant integration and utilization, the management of BMW Group will be able to further increase the capacity of its Mini production units to be in a position to move to the next stage of expansion, namely to reach a target of 300,000 units a year.

Originality/value

This is the first time in the UK that BMW has integrated three of its production facilities with those of three major component suppliers to produce a finished vehicle. There is a heavy concentration of KUKA robots within the BIW and sub‐assembly manufacturing facilities.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000