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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Eric T. Anderson and Elizabeth Anderson

From 2002 to 2011, coffee-machine manufacturer Keurig Incorporated had grown from a privately held company with just over $20 million in revenues and a plan to enter the…

Abstract

From 2002 to 2011, coffee-machine manufacturer Keurig Incorporated had grown from a privately held company with just over $20 million in revenues and a plan to enter the single serve coffee arena for home consumers, to a wholly owned subsidiary of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc., a publicly traded company with net revenues of $1.36 billion and a market capitalization of between $8 and $9 billion. In 2003 Keurig had introduced its first At Home brewer. Now, approximately 25 percent of all coffee makers sold in the United States were Keurig-branded machines, and Keurig was recognized as among the leaders in the marketplace. The company had just concluded agreements with both Dunkin' Donuts and Starbucks that would make these retailers' coffee available for use with Keurig's specialized brewing system. The company faced far different challenges than when it was a small, unknown marketplace entrant. John Whoriskey, vice president and general manager of Keurig's At Home division, had to consider the impact that impending expiration of key technology patents and the perceived environmental impact of the K-Cup® portion packs would have on the company's growth. Whoriskey also wondered what Keurig's growth potential was, and how the new arrangements with Starbucks and Dunkin' Donuts could be leveraged to achieve it.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

P.R. Cowley

Some capital‐intensive manufacturing businesses pose particular problems to market planners because the profit margins are often highly cyclical as seller capacity…

Abstract

Some capital‐intensive manufacturing businesses pose particular problems to market planners because the profit margins are often highly cyclical as seller capacity utilisation changes through the four‐year business cycle and may also be heavily affected by new entrants on the seller side or the emergence of strong buyers. This article examines how margins are related to market structure for Strategic Business Units in the PIMS database. Having identified that margins are related to some descriptions of market structure, it explores how the margin behaviour of capital‐intensive businesses can be modelled as changes in the relative power of buyers and sellers as the capacity utilisation of the sellers changes.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Abstract

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 52 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Ismail Hakki Hakkı Akçay, Habib Gürbüz, Hüsameddin Akçay and Mustafa Aldemir

This study seeks the effect on static thrust, thrust specific energy consumption (TSEC) and exhaust emissions of euro diesel-hydrogen dual-fuel combustion in a small…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks the effect on static thrust, thrust specific energy consumption (TSEC) and exhaust emissions of euro diesel-hydrogen dual-fuel combustion in a small turbojet engine.

Design/methodology/approach

Experimental studies are performed in a JetCat P80-SE type small turbojet engine. Euro diesel and hydrogen is fed through two different inlets in a common rail distributing fuel to the nozzles. Euro diesel fuel is fed by a liquid fuel pump to the engine, while hydrogen is fed by a fuel-line with a pressure of 5 bars from a gas cylinder with a pressure of approximately 200 bars.

Findings

At different engine speeds, it is found that there is a decrease at the TSEC between a range of 1% and 4.8% by different hydrogen energy fractions (HEF).

Research limitations/implications

The amount of hydrogen is adjusted corresponding to a range of 0–20% of the total heat energy of the euro diesel and hydrogen fuels. The small turbojet engine is operated between a range of 35,000 and 95,000 rpm engine speeds.

Practical implications

On the other hand, remarkable improvements in exhaust emissions (i.e. CO, CO2, HC and NOx) are observed with HEFs.

Originality/value

This is through providing improvements in performance and exhaust emissions using hydrogen as an alternative to conventional jet fuel in gas turbine engines.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Abstract

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2020

Chiranjeeva Rao Seela and Ravi Sankar B.

The purpose of this paper is to assess the influence of blends of Jatropha methyl ester (JME) and its nano Al2O3 emulsion on variable compression ratio diesel engine. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the influence of blends of Jatropha methyl ester (JME) and its nano Al2O3 emulsion on variable compression ratio diesel engine. The oxygen in alumina contributed for the smooth burning and resulted in improved performance and emissions.

Design/Methodology/Approach

The biodiesel (methyl ester) is prepared from the raw Jatropha oil. The B10, B20 and B30 blends of and their nanoemulsions are prepared with the 25, 50, 75 and 100 ppm of nano Al2O3. The prepared JME blends and its nanoemulsions are tested in a variable compression ratio (VCR) diesel engine to evaluate the engine performance and emission characteristics.

Findings

The nanoemulsion B20 + 50 ppm has given maximum brake thermal efficiency (BTE), and with the increased proportion of nanoparticle, the BTE was reduced. Also, the specific fuel consumption is lowest (0.2826 kg/kWh) for B20 + 50 ppm at the compression ratio 16.5 and full load which is 4.10% lower than the diesel and 5.8% lower than the B20 blend. As the load increases, NOx emission increases owing to higher peak temperatures in the combustion chamber. The JME-nano Al2O3 emulsion reduces the HC and CO emission compared with all other fuels.

Originality/Value

Novel nano emulsions are prepared, characterized and tested on VCR engine.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Neal D. Lawson

The physical and chemical properties of a new class of synthetic lubricants, the perfluoroalkylpolyether oils and the polytetrufluoroethylene‐thickened greases made from…

Abstract

The physical and chemical properties of a new class of synthetic lubricants, the perfluoroalkylpolyether oils and the polytetrufluoroethylene‐thickened greases made from these oils, are described in some detail. The properties which make these products of interest as lubricants for use under severe conditions are shown to be I) excellent thermal and oxidative stability, 2) extreme inertness to many reactive chemicals, 3) broad liquid range and good viscosity‐temperature characteristics, 4) complete nonflammability, 5) good lubricating qualities, 6) compatibility with most elastomers and metals at suitable operating temperatures and 7) insolubility in most common solvents. The commercial process used in the production of these lubricants is described. The oils are disclosed to be fluorine end capped polymers of hexafluoropropylene epoxide having number average molecular weights of from 2000 to 7500, and the preferred thickener for the greases is disclosed to be a telomer of tetrafluoroethylene having a molecular weight of 20,000 to 30,000. A number of the commercial uses of these oils and greases, sold by Du Pont under the trade‐name Krytox®, are described including specific examples of instances where their performance far exceeded that of other available lubricants. Some uses in the space and aircraft industries are also discussed.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 58 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Graeme Atherton

Higher education (HE) should be at the forefront of attempts to navigate a route through the confluence of disruptive forces affecting the world in the early twenty-fist…

Abstract

Higher education (HE) should be at the forefront of attempts to navigate a route through the confluence of disruptive forces affecting the world in the early twenty-fist century. The early part of the century has seen inequality, in particular, return to the fore. In its survey of over 200 global experts worldwide, the World Economic Forum (2017) stated that:

Growing income and wealth disparity is seen by respondents as the trend most likely to determine global developments over the next 10 years. (p. 11)

Growing income and wealth disparity is seen by respondents as the trend most likely to determine global developments over the next 10 years. (p. 11)

Yet, HE remains a bastion of inequality increasingly obsessed with rankings, which openly celebrate elitism in an era where elites are increasingly derided. Fostering inequality and celebrating elitism are becoming high-risk strategies in the midst of the post-crash populism of the 2010s. There are other routes open to what HE can be; safer and better ones for HE itself. However, it will take global advocacy and action if they are to be followed. This chapter presents the key evidence for, and a model, for such advocacy.

Details

Access to Success and Social Mobility through Higher Education: A Curate's Egg?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-836-1

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Gerasimos T. Soldatos and Erotokritos Varelas

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the factor of emotional intelligence (EI) into the calculus of neoclassical analysis under precautionary saving aiming at…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the factor of emotional intelligence (EI) into the calculus of neoclassical analysis under precautionary saving aiming at stabilizing consumption in the case of an exogenous output shock.

Design/methodology/approach

The introduction of EI differentiates individual firms in handling production uncertainty and individual consumers in coping with consumption uncertainty, but the source of uncertainty is exogenous and affects all the same; there are no idiosyncratic risks and uncertainties. This in conjunction with the median-voter-theory like approach to agent heterogeneity prompted by EI, replicates the result that aggregates quantitative predictions are almost indistinguishable from their representative agent counterpart in life cycle models of precautionary saving.

Findings

EI corroborates stabilization greatly but only the introduction of a monetary authority would fully stabilize the system by injecting or withdrawing money depending on the state of the economy. Money becomes centrally issued and it would be destabilizing if it was accompanied by central and/or commercial bank seigniorage. Median EI is found to coincide with homo economicus' rationality. These results point to the importance of preserving the institutional character of capitalism as a free enterprise but also a competitive system under a government in the service of the private sector.

Originality/value

Methodologically, this paper acknowledges the mutual interdependence between human action and social structure in the liberal setting in which free enterprise is a socioeconomic process that identifies value through exchange under the sociopolitical process of democracy.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Hokyung Shim, Jihyun Kim and Jungpyo Hong

The purpose of this paper is to study the electric vehicle (EV) drive efficiency of a traction motor considering regenerative braking according to various motor cores.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the electric vehicle (EV) drive efficiency of a traction motor considering regenerative braking according to various motor cores.

Design/methodology/approach

A software program was developed to predict the driving performance of an EV. It determines the driving mileage, the required power of the traction motor, and the operation points on a torque-speed map when drive cycles are given. The driving performance is calculated from the battery capacity, vehicle specification, and efficiency map of the traction motor computed using the finite element analysis.

Findings

As a result, the motor core is a significant design variable for raising the driving mileage of an EV. It is noted that the change of electrical steels used for the motor core is the lowest priced method of increasing the driving range by 2 km.

Originality/value

The comparative analysis of motor core by replacing 35PN250 to 25PNX1250F results in improvement effects traveling 4.62 and 5.16 km farther in the Simplified Federal Urban Driving Schedule (SFUDS) and Highway Fuel Economy Driving Schedule (HWFET), respectively. It was also verified that regenerative braking system is able to enhance drive efficiency by 29-31.3 km in the SFUDS and 6.5-7.3 km in the HWFET. From comparison of price rise for increasing driving mileage by 2 km, it is noted that the change of electrical steels used for the motor core is the lowest priced method.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

Keywords

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