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Abstract

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Panel Data Econometrics Theoretical Contributions and Empirical Applications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-836-0

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2020

Parisa Kamyab, Mohammad Reza Mozaffari, Javad Gerami and Peter F. Wankei

It is always of great importance for managers in organizations to evaluate their staff members and create incentive systems, using instruments such as Data Envelopment…

Abstract

Purpose

It is always of great importance for managers in organizations to evaluate their staff members and create incentive systems, using instruments such as Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) and DEA-R (DEA models based on ratio analysis). The purpose of this paper is to propose a two-stage network incentives system for commercial banks.

Design/methodology/approach

Centralized Resource Allocation (CRA) models make it possible to project all decision-making units (DMUs) onto the efficient frontier by solving a single linear programming model. In this paper, we use our proposed DEA-R-based CRA models to evaluate commercial banks in a two-stage case when the only ratios available are the assets-to-costs and income-to-assets vectors.

Findings

Thirteen commercial banks modeled as two-stage networks were evaluated by the models proposed in two different cases of ratio data. Results suggest that the proposed methodology yields more accurate efficiency scores, thus allowing better discrimination among DMUs. Furthermore, evaluating the DMUs when they are structured as two-stage (or even three-stage) networks makes it possible to examine the incentives system in more detail. Therefore, the use of incentive systems by managers would allow a better focus on the priority activities of commercial banks and a faster movement toward the frontier of best practices.

Originality/value

The super-efficiency scores of a number of commercial banks are evaluated based on the CRA model, as a cornerstone criterion for the two-stage evaluation in DEA-R, thus allowing the rank of each commercial bank in terms of the incentives system rather on the performance of the productive process.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 70 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2019

Nishant Agrawal

The purpose of this paper is to examine Philip B. Crosby’s 14 quality principles and analyze the interaction between them. Hitherto no research has been published on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine Philip B. Crosby’s 14 quality principles and analyze the interaction between them. Hitherto no research has been published on the implementation of total quality management (TQM) using Crosby’s 14 principles. To fill this gap, interpretive structural modeling (ISM) and Matrix Impact Cross-Reference Multiplication Applied to a Classification (MICMAC) analysis have been designed to prioritize, sequence and categorize variables to find both the dependence and driving power of these variables.

Design/methodology/approach

At the initial stage experts from industry as well as from academia were contacted to provide an input for ISM methodology and examine interactions between identified variables. In this approach, interpretations of the interrelationships among variables have been discussed, whereas MICMAC analysis is used to discover dependence and driving power.

Findings

The results of the investigation revealed that “Management Commitment,” “Quality Improvement Team,” “Quality Awareness,” “Supervisor Training,” “Goal Setting” and “Cost of Quality Evaluation” are strategic requirements; “Corrective Action,” “Zero Defects Day” and “Error Cause Removal” are tactical requirements. “Recognition,” “Quality Measurement,” “Quality Councils” and “Do It Over Again” are operational requirements for TQM applications.

Originality/value

ISM is used as a part of this research to provide valuable insights into interrelationships among Crosby’s quality principles through a systematic framework. The research opens up a new focus area on the implementation of TQM for services as well as for the manufacturing industry.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Abstract

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Urban Dynamics and Growth: Advances in Urban Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44451-481-3

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Piyush Jaiswal, Amit Singh, Subhas C. Misra and Amaresh Kumar

This study aims to investigate the interrelationships among the Lean manufacturing (LM) adoption barriers in Indian SMEs. This issue has its own importance as LM has…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the interrelationships among the Lean manufacturing (LM) adoption barriers in Indian SMEs. This issue has its own importance as LM has become the inescapable requirement for small- and medium-scale enterprises (SMEs) because of the increased concerns about quality, cost, delivery time and rapidly growing competition in the manufacturing sector and in India it is opposed by many factors/barriers. To act for the eradication of these barriers, we need to systematically analyze them.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the available literature and consultation with the experts, the authors identified 16 LM barriers for Indian SMEs. The authors analyzed the interdependencies among the barriers and prioritized them using integrated Grey-decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (grey-DEMATEL) approach.

Findings

The findings show that limited financial resources, fear in adopting new technology, lack of top management commitment and poor leadership quality are the most critical barriers for LM diffusion in Indian SMEs.

Research limitations/implications

The present research is based on the experts’ inputs, which may be subject to individual biases. In developing countries, such as India, geographical influences are also possible, which are neglected in this study.

Practical implications

This study provides significant insights that can help SMEs to focus on critical cause group barriers to accelerate the LM penetration.

Originality/value

The authors have proposed a Grey-DEMATEL-based LM barrier evaluation framework. Here, the authors analyze the interrelationships among the barriers for LM and segregate them in cause and effect groups.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2019

Rahul Sindhwani, Varinder Kumar Mittal, Punj Lata Singh, Ankur Aggarwal and Nishant Gautam

Many types of research have already investigated the lean, green or agile manufacturing systems in a discrete manner or as combinations of two of them. In today’s…

Abstract

Purpose

Many types of research have already investigated the lean, green or agile manufacturing systems in a discrete manner or as combinations of two of them. In today’s competitive scenario, if industry wants to perpetuate its name in the market, then it has to supervene proper thinking and smart approach. Therefore, the combination of lean, green and agile manufacturing systems can provide better and beneficial results. The purpose of this paper is to discern the barriers to the combined lean green agile manufacturing system (LGAMS), understand their interdependence and develop a framework to enhance LGAMS by using total interpretive structural modeling (TISM) and MICMAC (Matriced’ Impacts Croise’s Multiplication Appliquée a UN Classement) Analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses TISM methodology and MICMAC analysis to deduce the interrelationships between the barriers and rank them accordingly. A total of 13 barriers have been identified through extensive literature review and discussion with experts.

Findings

An integrated LGAMS has been presented that balances the lean, green and agile paradigms and can help supply chains become more efficient, streamlined and sustainable. Barriers are identified while referring to all three strategies to showcase the clear relevance. TISM models the barriers in different levels showcasing direct and important transitive relations. Further, MICMAC analysis distributes the barriers in four clusters in accordance with their driving and dependence power.

Research limitations/implications

The inferences have been drawn from a model developed on the basis of inputs from a small fraction of the industry and academia and may show variations when considering the whole industry.

Practical implications

The outcome of this research can contribute to bringing the change to the manufacturing systems used in most developing nations. Also, top managers considering adoption of LGAMS can be cautious of the most influential barriers.

Originality/value

A TISM-based model of the barriers to an integrated LGAMS has been proposed with evaluation of the influence of the barriers.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2019

Rakesh Raut, Bhaskar B. Gardas and Balkrishna Narkhede

Textile and Apparel (T&A) sector significantly influences socio-economic and environmental dimensions of the sustainability. The purpose of this paper is proposed to…

Abstract

Purpose

Textile and Apparel (T&A) sector significantly influences socio-economic and environmental dimensions of the sustainability. The purpose of this paper is proposed to establish the interrelationship among the critical barriers to the sustainable development of T&A supply chains by using a multi-criteria decision-making approach and to obtain a ranking of the barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

In the present investigation through literature review and from expert opinions, 14 significant challenges to the sustainable growth of T&A sector have identified. For establishing the interrelationship and for developing a structural model of the identified challenges, interpretive structural modelling (ISM) methodology is employed.

Findings

The results of the investigation revealed that lack of effective governmental policies (B8), poor infrastructure (B4), lack of effective level of integration (B6), low foreign investment (B13) and demonetization (B12) are the top most significant challenges.

Research limitations/implications

The model development based on the expert inputs from the industry and academia, these inputs could be biased influencing the accuracy of the model. Also, inclusion more factors for the analysis will improve the reliability of the model.

Originality/value

This research is intended to guide the policy and decision makers for improving overall the growth of the T&A supply chain.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1970

AL Minkes

The Advanced Management Course held at the Graduate Centre for Management Studies in Birmingham and introduced in 1965 represented what was in several ways a novel step in…

Abstract

The Advanced Management Course held at the Graduate Centre for Management Studies in Birmingham and introduced in 1965 represented what was in several ways a novel step in post‐experience courses at University level. It takes place each year from approximately October to March, being of six months duration and full‐time; most of those attending live at the Centre during the period of the course (though generally free to go home at the weekend if they wish). The members are, primarily, managers sponsored by companies or other organizations, with a normal minimum age of 25, sometimes aged over 40 but typically in the late 20's or early to mid‐30's. Usually there are a few self‐sponsored participants. This course provides, therefore, for the younger and middle manager. During the six months, he follows an intensive programme in the management sciences. He deals with economics, especially the economics of the firm, and the tools of numeracy in management; mathematics, statistics and management accounting. He also studies basic ideas in sociology and social psychology which relate to the management of the human resource. However, he also devotes a good deal of time to the applications of those ideas to such functions as finance, marketing and personnel and to important areas such as operational research and industrial relations. At the end of the course the Diploma of the Graduate Centre is awarded by examination. The Graduate Centre for Management Studies is a jointly sponsored institution of the Universities of Aston and Birmingham. Full details of the Advanced Management Course and of other aspects of the Centre's work may be obtained from the Secretary, Graduate Centre for Management Studies, 36 Wake Green Road, Birmingham B13 9PD, telephone: 021–449 4137.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2021

Dheeraj Nimawat and B.D. Gidwani

Industry 4.0 is regarded as a modern industrial phase wherein convergence between horizontal and vertical production systems, along with their interactions, would enable…

Abstract

Purpose

Industry 4.0 is regarded as a modern industrial phase wherein convergence between horizontal and vertical production systems, along with their interactions, would enable industries to obtain excellent industrial efficiency. This research thus explores the barriers relevant to Industry 4.0 and their cause and effect relations using the decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL) technique, and this will assist in the implementation of Industry 4.0 in manufacturing industries.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature review is carried out to outline the barriers for the Industry 4.0 implementation. The investigative techniques used in this research were conducted utilizing a questionnaire as an instrument for collecting data. The data collected were analysed using the method DEMATEL.

Findings

The findings indicate that key barriers to implementing Industry 4.0 include their cause and effect relationships. Reported “implementation costs” have been a critical barrier for Industry 4.0 implementation. Prioritization of barriers and their cause and effect relationships was achieved so that decision-makers could concentrate on overcoming such barriers for Industry 4.0 implementation.

Practical implications

The research is intended to assist executives in recognizing the barriers to Industry 4.0 implementation in their manufacturing industries. Furthermore, the strong functional and empirical importance of emerging and digital manufacturing technologies ensures that understanding the necessary barriers to implementation is important.

Originality/value

This is one of the first few empirical studies in the field of Indian manufacturing industries that uses the DEMATEL method framework as a foundation for recognizing cause-effect interactions among the barriers that affect Industry 4.0.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Asit Bhattacharyya

The purpose of this paper is threefold; first, to examine the Australian and Indian managerial attitudes towards social responsibility (SR) and assess their support for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold; first, to examine the Australian and Indian managerial attitudes towards social responsibility (SR) and assess their support for SR; second, to explore the underlying factors that shape beliefs and attitudes; and third, to explore whether respondents from these countries, characterised by differing levels of development, differ in their attitudes towards SR.

Design/methodology/approach

It investigates attitudes and support for SR of 318 Australian and Indian managers drawn from three industries. Eighteen social issues, principal component analysis (PCA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) procedures were undertaken to explore and confirm the underlying factors of SR. The paper used legitimacy theory as theoretical framework.

Findings

An overall positive attitude towards SR is shown by the both groups. Indian respondents are concerned about a greater range of social issues than Australian respondents. Australian participants strongly supported a few issues surrounding SR, whereas Indian respondents strongly supported these and other issues. Significant (at 0.00 level) differences do exist between the two groups of managers on attitudes towards various social issues.

Research limitations/implications

The questions used in the survey do not represent the entire framework on which attitudes towards SR are formed. Moreover, culture was not explicitly explored as a possible factor in the study.

Originality/value

The study provides a comparative analysis of the SR from the developed and developing economy perspective. Using organisational legitimacy theory the study analyse managerial attitudes with regard to maintaining pragmatic and moral legitimacy.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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