Search results

1 – 2 of 2
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1976

B.M. Doouss and G.L. Collins

This monograph defines distributed intelligence and discusses the relationship of distributed intelligence to data base, justifications for using the technique, and the…

Downloads
62

Abstract

This monograph defines distributed intelligence and discusses the relationship of distributed intelligence to data base, justifications for using the technique, and the approach to successful implementation of the technique. The approach is then illustrated by reference to a case study of experience in Birds Eye Foods. The planning process by which computing strategy for the company was decided is described, and the planning conclusions reached to date are given. The current state of development in the company is outlined and the very real savings so far achieved are specified. Finally, the main conclusions of the monograph are brought together. In essence these conclusions are that major savings are achievable using distributed intelligence, and that the implementation of a company data processing plan can be made quicker and simpler by its use. However, careful central control must be maintained so as to avoid fragmentation of machine, language skills, and application taking place.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1977

Tage Skjoett‐Larsen

An essential part of any logistics system is the information flow related to the physical transactions. Without accurate and timely information the logistics system cannot…

Abstract

An essential part of any logistics system is the information flow related to the physical transactions. Without accurate and timely information the logistics system cannot respond efficiently and in a co‐ordinated way. Traditionally information systems in most companies have developed in a relatively unplanned, evolutionary way with little thought given to the inter‐relationships between the various subsystems. Manual systems have gradually been automated as the computer becomes more widespread, but the computerised operating units have normally been treated as independent subsystems. The next step in the development process is, however, to attempt to integrate all the inter‐related subsystems into an overall logistics information system. In this article we will focus on the general structure of the logistics information system (LIS), the interactions between the various subsystems, and the implications of integrating the system. The purpose is to present a conceptual framework around which an integrated logistics information system can be developed.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0020-7527

1 – 2 of 2