Search results

1 – 10 of 305
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

B.L. MacCarthy and W. Atthirawong

Only a limited amount of research has been reported on factors influencing international location decisions for contemporary manufacturing operations. In this paper a…

Downloads
16488

Abstract

Only a limited amount of research has been reported on factors influencing international location decisions for contemporary manufacturing operations. In this paper a comprehensive set of factors that may influence international location decisions is identified from an analysis of the existing literature. Results are presented from a Delphi study that used a worldwide panel of experts to investigate factors affecting international location decisions. Findings are reported on the motivations of firms in seeking to manufacture across national borders and the key steps that should be followed in making international location decisions. The top five major factors identified that may strongly influence international location decisions generally were: costs, infrastructure, labour characteristics, government and political factors and economic factors. Ten key sub‐factors identified were: quality of labour force, existence of modes of transportation, quality and reliability of modes of transportation, availability of labour force, quality and reliability of utilities, wage rates, motivation of workers, telecommunication systems, record of government stability and industrial relations laws. Additional sub‐factors of increasing importance include: protection of patents, availability of management resources and specific skills and system and integration costs. The factors identified have implications for management practice, for policy‐making by governments and other agencies and for academic research in international operations.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Bart L. MacCarthy, Constantin Blome, Jan Olhager, Jagjit Singh Srai and Xiande Zhao

Supply chains evolve and change in size, shape and configuration, and in how they are coordinated, controlled and managed. Some supply chains are mature and relatively…

Downloads
13540

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chains evolve and change in size, shape and configuration, and in how they are coordinated, controlled and managed. Some supply chains are mature and relatively unchanging. Some are subject to significant change. New supply chains may emerge and evolve for a variety of reasons. The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of supply chain evolution and address the question “What makes a supply chain like it is?”

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses and develops key aspects, concepts and principal themes concerning the emergence and evolution of supply chains over their lifecycle.

Findings

The paper defines the supply chain lifecycle and identifies six factors that interact and may affect a supply chain over its lifecycle – technology and innovation, economics, markets and competition, policy and regulation, procurement and sourcing, supply chain strategies and re-engineering. A number of emergent themes and propositions on factors affecting a supply chain’s characteristics over its lifecycle are presented. The paper argues that a new science is needed to investigate and understand the supply chain lifecycle.

Practical implications

Supply chains are critical for the world economy and essential for modern life. Understanding the supply chain lifecycle and how supply chains evolve provides new perspectives for contemporary supply chain design and management.

Originality/value

The paper presents detailed analysis, critique and reflections from leading researchers on emerging, evolving and mature supply chains.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 36 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Rupert Lawrence Matthews, Bart L. MacCarthy and Christos Braziotis

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how organisational learning (OL) can occur through process improvement (PI) activities, leading to sustained improvements over…

Downloads
2314

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how organisational learning (OL) can occur through process improvement (PI) activities, leading to sustained improvements over time in the context of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors study PI practices in six engineering-oriented SMEs via interview-based case studies. The authors draw from a range of literature and use an OL conceptual framework informed by Crossan et al.’s (1999) 4I framework as an analytical lens.

Findings

The OL perspective provides new insights to conceptualise the nature of PI as a multi-level practice in SMEs. Effective PI practices within SMEs are shown to be consistent with OL concepts, enabling firms to translate individually identified improvement opportunities into organisational-level changes that result in sustained benefits. A new conceptual model is presented that explains how SMEs can learn through improvement activities. The key role of management support, both operational and strategic, is highlighted. It is necessary for management to provide sufficient PI opportunities to enable and sustain beneficial learning.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on a sample of engineering-oriented SMEs located in the UK. Further case-based, longitudinal, and survey-based research studies with firms of different types will enhance the generalisability of the findings, allowing the confirmation and extension of the new conceptual model.

Practical implications

The findings provide a theoretically underpinned framework for achieving OL in engineering-oriented SMEs through PI activities. The new model highlights the key mechanisms that enable learning from improvement activities. The findings highlight the key role played by management in introducing additional learning opportunities in the form of new business that requires exploratory learning. Without this, the reduction in improvement opportunities reduces the benefits that can be realised from PI.

Originality/value

OL provides a multi-level perspective to understanding how smaller firms are able to undergo systematic improvements and the support required to continually improve.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

José Gomes Requeijo, Rogério Puga-Leal and Ana Sofia Matos

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the causes for the discrepancy between the utilization of statistical process control (SPC) in services and manufacturing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the causes for the discrepancy between the utilization of statistical process control (SPC) in services and manufacturing. Furthermore, an approach for integrating customer demands and technical aspects of a service is presented. Services are very often characterized by a large number of characteristics, with relatively few observations. This research addresses a methodology based on Z and W charts, proposing it for the control of service features. An example associated with service provision is presented to illustrate the computation of Z and W as well as its interpretation.

Design/methodology/approach

The shortcomings of traditional control charts are stated and compared with the control charts for Z and W. An example illustrates how to utilize these charts, their ability to monitor several characteristics simultaneously, along with a continuous monitoring of process capability.

Findings

The proposed approach allowed the representation of several process characteristics in the same charts, even when those characteristics are not collected with the same periodicity. The Z and W charts are dimensionless and can be applied whenever it is possible to estimate process parameters, being an interesting approach to be utilized in Phase 2 of SPC. The difficulty for identifying the existence of non-random patterns emerges as the major shortcoming for these charts.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed approach is a contribute to overcoming the discrepancy that persists between the utilization of SPC in services and manufacturing. Nevertheless, service production and consumption are frequently simultaneous, which constitutes an issue hard to deal with that is not fully addressed in this piece of research. Furthermore, the Z charts also present some disadvantages, notably an increased difficulty for analyzing the existence of non-random patterns, which worsens as increases the number of products/quality characteristics to be checked.

Practical implications

The proposed charts are very flexible and provide a rational utilization of resources. In fact, the representation of several processes is possible, along with the traditional analysis of patterns, thus providing an effective approach for controlling services processes.

Social implications

Several quantitative approaches that have been utilized in manufacturing for a long time are still scarce in services. However, services play a major role in modern economies, being clear that improvements in service provision might have a direct impact on society.

Originality/value

The approach was based on the utilization of Z/W with samples, but it can be extended to individual observations or even to the control of discrete variables. Additionally, a methodology for process capability analysis in real-time is also proposed.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Bart L. MacCarthy, Michael Lewis, Chris Voss and Ram Narasimhan

The world is changing – economically, technologically, politically, and socially. As an academic discipline, operations management (OM) is, almost by definition, close to…

Downloads
2182

Abstract

Purpose

The world is changing – economically, technologically, politically, and socially. As an academic discipline, operations management (OM) is, almost by definition, close to practice. Are our OM research methods fit for purpose for the new age? This paper reflects on and develops the principal themes discussed in the “OM Methodology” Special Session at the 2011 EurOMA Conference in Cambridge, UK. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The emerging landscape in which future OM research will be conducted is discussed. The paper provides a range of perspectives on the research challenges facing the discipline with respect to what the authors research and how the authors research it. The range of methods open to us and their relative merits and challenges are debated.

Findings

The traditional research divide between quantitative modelling, often normative in outlook, and the more reflective modes of qualitative enquiry, with a wide spectrum of empirical work in between, is reflected in the different academic traditions, groupings, conferences, and publications across the discipline. Research should not be driven by methodological convenience but by the needs of a changing world. Rather than a sterile “quants versus qual” debate, the paper argues that a rich diversity of approaches can provide a reinforcing cycle to generate relevant, interesting and exciting research underpinned by robust and valid theory.

Originality/value

The paper presents detailed reflections from leading researchers on contemporary and future OM research, arguing that research approaches must evolve that reflect the new realities to further enhance OM as a theoretically sound and practically relevant discipline.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Duangpun Kritchanchai and B.L. MacCarthy

This paper discusses evidence from field studies undertaken to investigate the responsiveness of the order fulfilment process in a number of companies. The evidence is…

Downloads
4153

Abstract

This paper discusses evidence from field studies undertaken to investigate the responsiveness of the order fulfilment process in a number of companies. The evidence is analysed in the context of the literature on responsiveness and related areas such as time‐based competition. Similarities and differences are analysed across a number of industrial sectors with respect to order fulfilment processes and the interpretation and significance of responsiveness. Generic factors that influence different types of companies are identified. Four components of responsiveness – stimuli, awareness, capabilities and goals – emerge from an analysis of the literature. The field and case study evidence allows the development of more precise definitions and descriptions of each of these components. The study also allows a generic responsiveness framework to be developed that incorporates both strategic and operational viewpoints. The need for more field studies on responsiveness is noted. More work is advocated on the assessment and measurement of responsiveness and on developing appropriate responsiveness interventions, particularly with respect to the order fulfilment process.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 19 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 27 April 2020

Luiz Philipi Calegari, Marianne Costa Avalone and Diego Castro Fettermann

This study is to propose a procedure to support decisions on which enablers should be employed to minimize the impact of barriers to implementing mass customization…

Abstract

Purpose

This study is to propose a procedure to support decisions on which enablers should be employed to minimize the impact of barriers to implementing mass customization strategies in food companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Through interpretive structural modeling, the authors analyzed the relationships between barriers. Then, with an approach similar to the quality function deployment technique, commonly used in general product and process development, the authors clarified the relationships between barriers and enablers.

Findings

The results revealed 19 barriers and 17 enablers for implementing food mass customization. The analysis indicates that most of the barriers (16) present strong associations with each other. The barrier “products with non-customizable features” depends on the whole chain of associations and causes a minor impact on the other barriers. In turn, the barrier “ingredient incompatibility” causes impact over the whole chain, and its dependence on other barriers is very low.

Research limitations/implications

The results were tested in a single Brazilian company in the food sector.

Practical implications

The findings can allow food manufacturing companies to focus their efforts on the improvement of enabling technologies, such as smart packaging, Internet of Things and additive manufacture.

Social implications

This study would help food companies to improve their business and provide better products to society.

Originality/value

There are few recommendations in the literature to how to implement mass customization strategy in companies from the food sector. This study fills in this gap presenting a procedure to guide managerial staff to develop this promising approach for food companies.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Mahendrawathi Er and Bart MacCarthy

For manufacturing enterprises, today's business environment is characterised by globally dispersed supply and manufacturing networks. In addition, the level of variety in…

Downloads
2728

Abstract

Purpose

For manufacturing enterprises, today's business environment is characterised by globally dispersed supply and manufacturing networks. In addition, the level of variety in products continues to increase in almost all sectors. Greater understanding of the management of product variety in international operations is required. Aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A generic simulation model representing a multinational corporation (MNC) supply chain is used to investigate the impact on supply chain performance of increasing product variety in combination with supply lead‐time and demand uncertainty in an international setting. The simulation focuses on the upstream activities of production planning, inbound supply and manufacturing. The structure and logic of the simulation model are based on insights obtained from an empirical study of real MNC supply networks.

Findings

The study shows that increasing the level of product variety has a detrimental impact on supply chain performance. In the presence of supply lead‐time and demand uncertainty, high levels of variety result in much longer flow times and much higher system inventory relative to more stable conditions. The impact is greatest when variety involves critical materials which are required early in the production process and that entail long set‐up times.

Research limitations/implications

The study could be extended to incorporate more advanced inventory control models, the inclusion of downstream activities, multiple manufacturing sites and multiple potential supply routes.

Practical implications

Implications for the selection of suppliers and for inventory control policies are discussed in the context of international operations. The potential value of postponement strategies and the need in some cases for fundamental product and process redesign to mitigate the negative impacts of variety are highlighted.

Originality/value

Managing product variety in the context of international operations has received very little attention to date in the research literature. This study quantifies the potential impact of increasing product variety on supply chain performance in an international setting.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 17 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 January 2020

Claudia Lizette Garay-Rondero, Jose Luis Martinez-Flores, Neale R. Smith, Santiago Omar Caballero Morales and Alejandra Aldrette-Malacara

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual model that defines the essential components shaping the new Digital Supply Chains (DSCs) through the implementation…

Downloads
24454

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual model that defines the essential components shaping the new Digital Supply Chains (DSCs) through the implementation and acceleration of Industry 4.0.

Design/methodology/approach

The scope of the present work exposes a conceptual approach and review of the key literature from 1989 to 2019, concerning the evolution and transformation of the actors and constructs in logistics and Supply Chain Management (SCM) by means of examining different conceptual models and a state-of-the-art review of Industry 4.0’s concepts and elements, with a focus on digitization in supply chain (SC) processes. A detailed study of the constructs and components of SCM, as defined by their authors, resulted in the development of a referential and systematic model that fuses the inherent concepts and roles of SCM, with the new technological trends directed toward digitization, automation, and the increasing use of information and communication technologies across logistics global value chains.

Findings

Having achieved an exploration of the different conceptual frameworks, there is no compelling evidence of the existence of a conceptual SCM that incorporates the basic theoretical constructs and the new roles and elements of Industry 4.0. Therefore, the main components of Industry 4.0 and their impact on DSC Management are described, driving the proposal for a new conceptual model which addresses and accelerates a vision of the future of the interconnectivity between different DSCs, grouped in clusters in order to add value, through new forms of cooperation and digital integration.

Originality/value

This research explores the gap in the current SCM models leading into Industry 4.0. The proposed model provides a novel and comprehensive overview of the new concepts and components driving the nascent and current DSCs. This conceptual framework will further aid researchers in the exploration of knowledge regarding the variables and components presented, as well as the verification of the newly revealed roles and constructs to understand the new forms of cooperation and implementation of Industry 4.0 in digitalized SCs.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Dandison C. Ukpabi, Bilal Aslam and Heikki Karjaluoto

Purpose: The information-intensive nature of the tourism and hospitality industry requires regular communication between firms and customers. Yet, customer service…

Abstract

Purpose: The information-intensive nature of the tourism and hospitality industry requires regular communication between firms and customers. Yet, customer service personnel’s high contact levels with customers often lead to customer dissatisfaction arising from embarrassment in emotion-inducing service encounters. Accordingly, such companies have been seeking a cost-effective means of maintaining consistency in customer contact. Thus, it seems that the future of chatbots is here.

Design/methodology/approach: This chapter examines chatbots in two ways: the technical composition and its adoption by tourism firms. The technical perspective is represented by a diagram which espouses the functioning of chatbots from inputs query to output reply. On its adoption by tourism firms, two main organizational theories were proposed.

Findings: While chatbots are diffusing rapidly in other areas, their use in the tourism and hospitality industry remains low. We have examined the role of chatbots in various areas of the tourism and hospitality industry and highlighted the barriers to their successful adoption. By applying a conceptual and theoretical approach, our study used a hybrid of institutional theory and organizational learning theory and diagrammatically espouses how the integration of these theories can aid subsequent studies to understand the environmental and organization-specific factors influencing chatbots adoption.

Research limitations/implications: This study is conceptual, consequently, we recommend future studies to empirical test and validate our proposed conceptual framework.

Originality/value: This study is one of the earliest studies that advances firm-level adoption of chatbots by integrating two key organizational theories.

Details

Robots, Artificial Intelligence, and Service Automation in Travel, Tourism and Hospitality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-688-0

Keywords

1 – 10 of 305