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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1947

B.A. Noble

THE limitations of the various methods of Beam Analysis are often improperly understood and it is felt that an explanation and criticism of them would be of some value.

Abstract

THE limitations of the various methods of Beam Analysis are often improperly understood and it is felt that an explanation and criticism of them would be of some value.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2018

Bruce M.K. Mwiya, Yong Wang, Bernadette Kaulungombe and Maidah Kayekesi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of entrepreneurial intention (EI) in relation to the influence of the five dimensions of entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of entrepreneurial intention (EI) in relation to the influence of the five dimensions of entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) on nascent behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The study relies on a quantitative approach where primary data were collected from 294 final year undergraduate students at a public university in Zambia. The data were examined by using correlation, logistic regression and mediation analyses.

Findings

The findings indicate that each of the five dimensions of ESE is positively and significantly related with EI. Additionally, each of the ESE dimensions, except the financial aspect, is positively correlated with nascent behaviour. Finally, the results show that the influence of ESE dimensions on nascent behaviour is significantly mediated by intention.

Research limitations/implications

The study took place in a public university in Zambia; more universities could be involved to improve the generalisability of the study conclusions.

Practical implications

The study shows that the five ESE dimensions positively influence not only business start-up intention but also nascent behaviour. To motivate graduates’ involvement in business start-up, there is a need to tailor training and practical pedagogical approaches on entrepreneurship that are focussed on developing the five ESE dimensions.

Originality/value

This paper extends an emerging body of knowledge which has not been fully investigated in terms of the mediating role of intention on the relationships between dimensions of ESE and nascent behaviour. The study also makes a valuable contribution to the under-researched context of Zambia and African entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2018

Yasir Shahab, Ye Chengang, Angel David Arbizu and Muhammad Jamal Haider

The purpose of this paper is to present a “moderated-mediation model” covering the nexus between entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) and entrepreneurial intentions (EIs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a “moderated-mediation model” covering the nexus between entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) and entrepreneurial intentions (EIs) by comparing an emerging market (China) and a mature market (Spain). By drawing on the theory of planned behaviour and self-efficacy, this study theorizes that entrepreneurial creativity (EC) and attitudes towards entrepreneurship (ATE) mediate the relationship between ESI and EIs; moreover, entrepreneurial education (EE) moderates these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employs a survey-based methodology and uses a 37-item questionnaire for a total sample of 808 student respondents from both countries. Further, the study employs the structural equation modelling and confirmatory factor analysis to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that EC and ATE positively mediate the relationship between ESI and EI. Further, with EE, individuals can efficiently develop EC to successfully nurture their EIs, regardless of their countries’ economic maturity.

Practical implications

Being able to identify the importance of EC and education for future entrepreneurs is of definite concern for all the business eco-system: from intentions of young entrepreneurs to governments; new levers, facilitators and approaches, e.g. policies will be able to be adopted.

Originality/value

This research provides valuable insights on the importance of EC and education in the determination of EIs in two very distinct markets for the first time.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Ellena S. King, Trent E. Johnson, Susan E.P. Bastian, Patricia Osidacz and I. Leigh Francis

The purpose of this paper is to determine the degree to which wine consumers in South Australia have different liking for white wine styles, and to relate reported liking…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the degree to which wine consumers in South Australia have different liking for white wine styles, and to relate reported liking to wine knowledge and demographic differences.

Design/methodology/approach

A group of 150 regular white wine drinking consumers from the Adelaide metropolitan area responded to a wine habits and attitudes questionnaire. Consumers were segmented based on self‐reported liking of white wine styles, with three distinct segments identified.

Findings

Sauvignon Blanc wine likers were mainly younger females with low wine knowledge who reported not drinking Chardonnay wines. Conversely, “Riesling wine likers” were generally older with higher wine knowledge. These consumers were interested in the region, vintage and alcohol level when purchasing white wine. The final group (40 percent of the total sample) had a lower liking for Riesling wines, but liked all types relatively highly, had low to moderate wine knowledge and took more note of expert opinion than the other clusters.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study can be extrapolated to the South Australian population, however, the sample size may restrict the generalisation of the results to the broader Australian population.

Originality/value

The results of this study provide initial insights into the behaviour of white wine consumers and highlight the importance of wine knowledge in differentiating consumer liking. Some strategies for influencing consumers' preference are suggested.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Ruth McKay

Women entrepreneurs are a vital contributor to today’s economy, employing one from every four employees in the USA. Yet, there is still a dearth of research on women…

Abstract

Women entrepreneurs are a vital contributor to today’s economy, employing one from every four employees in the USA. Yet, there is still a dearth of research on women entrepreneurs. This study examines a particular group of women entrepreneurs largely ignored by the literature: entrepreneurs over 50 years old. It focuses on women who do not have a family, or whose children have grown up. Given the aging population this group will increase in numbers and impact on gross domestic product and employment statistics. This paper explores the characteristics of this unique group of entrepreneurs and considers if gender is implicit in the organizational structures of the businesses established by these women.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Andrés Barrios, Maria G. Piacentini and Laura Salciuviene

Purpose – By analysing the experience of homelessness, this chapter aims to understand how individuals experience involuntary life changes in uncertain contexts and…

Abstract

Purpose – By analysing the experience of homelessness, this chapter aims to understand how individuals experience involuntary life changes in uncertain contexts and analyses the role of consumption, in terms of possessions and practices, along the process.

Methodology/approach – This study adopts a phenomenological approach, focusing on the homelessness experience. It involves an 18 month quasi-ethnography study in a charity that supports the homeless individuals, where interviews about their retrospective biographical accounts were performed. The data was analysed using existential phenomenological procedures.

Findings – Informants’ pathways to homelessness reveal a four-stage process of forced self-transformation (initial self, forced negotiation, transition, transformed self) which takes place across two stressful situational contexts: the triggering events for transformation (i.e. that led informants to lose their home) and the persisting state of uncertainty (i.e. further survival living in the streets).

Social implications – In the current postmodern times there is greater uncertainty surrounding individuals’ life changes. The consequences of the current economic crisis have threatened individuals to lose their homes. By having a better understanding of the way individuals experience this type of loss, the study brings new information about how to support them.

Originality/value of chapter – This study highlights contexts where Van Gennep's transformational routine may not be suitable in the current postmodern times, and provides an alternative transformational routine that takes into account the uncertainty that accompanies involuntary transformations.

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-022-2

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Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2011

Mike Molesworth, Rebecca Jenkins and Sue Eccles

Purpose – In this chapter we consider how two apparently disconnected practices – one very human (loving relationships), another the apparently alienating outcome of…

Abstract

Purpose – In this chapter we consider how two apparently disconnected practices – one very human (loving relationships), another the apparently alienating outcome of consumer technology (videogame play) – may turn out to be linked in very intimate and perhaps surprising ways. In making this connection we hope to comment on how consumer practices may be understood in the context of dynamic human relationships and cultural ideals.

Methodology – We conducted 36 phenomenological interviews with adult videogame players in order to elicit everyday experiences of videogame play in the context of the individual's lifeworld. This chapter deals with aspects of data that explore relationships with partners and children.

Findings – We illustrate that consumer practices, ideals, and even couples are not stable things, but are subject to routine reconfiguration throughout life. We suggest the possibility of a triadic theory of human relationships that consists of the people themselves, their consumer practices, and ideas about what love means.

Originality/value of paper – Previous questions about the value of videogame consumption have tended to ask about violence or the normalcy of how we might spend our time. In this chapter we have attempted to shift the focus to questions about human relationships and how they might be enacted with consumer technologies. By understanding the interactions between human actors, their consumer practices and their ideals we are able to comment on existing critiques and celebrations of the impact of consumer culture on human relationships.

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-116-9

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Book part
Publication date: 2 July 2010

Reinoud Leenders

This article calls for closer attention to the Middle East in the wider debate on the purported rise of new modes of armed conflict following the end of the Cold War…

Abstract

This article calls for closer attention to the Middle East in the wider debate on the purported rise of new modes of armed conflict following the end of the Cold War, particularly in relation to the notion of ‘regional conflict formations’ (RCFs). In so doing, it presents and analyses three main paradoxes. First, though the contemporary Middle East had its own share of intrastate conflicts that generally grew into regional constellations, a look at the region's post-colonial history suggests that such trends are not as novel as has often been claimed. Second, the striking longevity of regionally entwined conflict in the Middle East calls into question the common and generalizing argument that it was the end of the Cold War, together with the alleged disengagement of the superpowers, that constituted the radical shifts – including the rise of RCFs – that signalled the demise of old forms of politics and conflict involving weak states. Third, Middle Eastern states, mostly authoritarian in outlook, have over recent decades become stronger despite prevailing conditions of regionalized conflict; indeed, as tentatively suggested in this article, to some extent because of those factors.

Details

Troubled Regions and Failing States: The Clustering and Contagion of Armed Conflicts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-102-3

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Muhammad Nizam Zainuddin and Mohd Rozaini Mohd Rejab

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effectiveness of undergraduates' specialised entrepreneurship programmes in Malaysian universities that have been made available…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effectiveness of undergraduates' specialised entrepreneurship programmes in Malaysian universities that have been made available to “ME generation” students. By analysing the antecedents and predicting self‐employment intention, the paper evaluates the impact of such programmes upon the employability value of undergraduates who are part of the ME generation in a developing country such as Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

A census survey was conducted on final and penultimate year students from major public and private universities in Malaysia. From these data, analyses of variables that affect self‐employment intention were performed, and the prediction of self‐employment intention was obtained.

Findings

The results show that the students do not perceive self‐realisation as their most salient beliefs and perceived that their entrepreneurship lecturers' expectations towards them to become self‐employed are not highly influential and need to be complied with. However, they believed that specialised entrepreneurship education (SEE) contributes to increasing entrepreneurial self‐efficacy and subsequently towards their self‐employment intention, and thus increases their employability value.

Research limitations/implications

This research only studies students' self‐employment intention in their respective universities and not their actual behaviour. Results from the paper are limited in ability to demonstrate “actual” outcomes that result from the interaction of the antecedents in universities' confinement.

Practical implications

The paper provides an important analysis of the current status of entrepreneurship students in Malaysian universities. The findings provide insight on the development of effective entrepreneurship programme deliveries and methodologies.

Originality/value

The paper provides a basis to improve the effectiveness of SEE in Malaysian universities and in turn produce highly employable graduates.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 52 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2009

Stephanie A. Macht and John Robinson

Entrepreneurial businesses often face financial and experiential gaps, which can constrain their growth. Business angels (BAs) can provide sources of financial, human and…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurial businesses often face financial and experiential gaps, which can constrain their growth. Business angels (BAs) can provide sources of financial, human and social capital to overcome these gaps. Building on the work by Munck and Saublens, this paper aims to introduce a framework that seeks to provide a detailed understanding of the benefits that BAs can bring to the firms in which they invest.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to obtain a detailed understanding of the benefits that BAs bring to their investee companies, semi‐structured, in‐depth telephone interviews were conducted from an investee perspective. The key managers of nine angel‐funded companies were purposefully selected and the transcribed interviews analysed with the help of common qualitative analysis techniques.

Findings

According to investee managers, BAs provide benefits in all four areas of the proposed framework. Specifically, BAs: help overcome funding gaps; fill knowledge/experience gaps through provision of their own expertise and involvement; provide a wide range of contacts and leverage further funding, including their own follow‐on finance.

Research limitations/implications

The anonymous nature of the BA market requires convenience sampling, which, in addition to the small sample size used, does not allow for generalisability. The use of telephone interviews instead of face‐to‐face interviews did not allow for observation of non‐verbal cues. Nevertheless, the study identified various areas in need of further research.

Originality/value

In‐depth interview data enabled a detailed exploration of the financial and non‐financial benefits of BA funding from an under‐utilised investee perspective. The paper's main value, however, lies in establishing the usefulness of a framework showing BAs' benefits in a structured manner.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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