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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

B. Lotter

The dividing line between the sensible and efficient use of assembly robots and that of dedicated automatic assembly machines requires detailed planning.

Abstract

The dividing line between the sensible and efficient use of assembly robots and that of dedicated automatic assembly machines requires detailed planning.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

Bruno Lotter

With the development of laser welding technology, welding techniques are increasingly used in automatic assembly machines. The main advantage of laser welding is due to…

Abstract

With the development of laser welding technology, welding techniques are increasingly used in automatic assembly machines. The main advantage of laser welding is due to the contactless welding, which largely obviates the need of equipment maintenance.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Book part
Publication date: 1 May 2019

Djordje Popovic and Carin Rösiö

The purpose of the study was to investigate the alignment between current product and manufacturing systems and how it could be achieved.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to investigate the alignment between current product and manufacturing systems and how it could be achieved.

Design/Methodology/Approach

Case study research method was chosen for the collection and analysis of empirical data. The data was of qualitative nature and was collected using research techniques such as observations through video recordings of processes, documents and open and semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The variation of outer side sub-element of the exterior wall element was found to not be aligned with its corresponding assembly. A hybrid assembly of outer side sub-elements characterised by flexibility and reconfigurability can be developed.

Research Limitations/Implications

The study is limited to the exterior wall element and corresponding manufacturing system.

Practical Implications

The presented approach was formulated with the aim to be used both for the analysis of existing products and manufacturing systems as well as for the design of new manufacturing systems.

Originality/Value

So far, this is the first study in the context of timber house building where the alignment between product and manufacturing systems was investigated by considering product variety and flexibility of manufacturing systems.

Details

10th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-051-1

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Kürşad Ağpak

Cycle time fluctuations in assembly lines are one of the important reasons of re‐balancing. As a result of re‐balancing of assembly lines, it will be necessary to change…

Abstract

Purpose

Cycle time fluctuations in assembly lines are one of the important reasons of re‐balancing. As a result of re‐balancing of assembly lines, it will be necessary to change task sequences or equipment locations. The purpose of this paper is to find the task sequence which enables assembly line balancing (ALB) with minimum number of stations (NS) for different cycle times such that tasks and equipment or fixture locations remain unchanged.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper a heuristic which consist of two stages is proposed to find a common task sequence for different cycle times in assembly lines.

Findings

It is shown that optimal NS for different cycle times can be achieved with a fixed task sequence.

Research limitations/implications

The approach is limited to a single model case. Model variety together with cycle time variety can be investigated in further studies.

Practical implications

Assembly lines which require less time and cost for re‐balancing can be easily designed by the proposed approach.

Originality/value

ALB problem is handled with a new viewpoint. Also, it is observed that the proposed approach serves as a bridge between assembly line design and balancing. In this regard, it is thought to have an important place in the ALB literature.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

D.T. Matt

The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodological guidance for the practical use of the axiomatic designed production module template presented in a former…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodological guidance for the practical use of the axiomatic designed production module template presented in a former publication. The objective is to accelerate the design process and increase the quality of results in the design of lean production systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Two case studies based on practical cases were presented to different test teams. A first test cycle helped to improve the user friendliness of the axiomatic designed tree of functional requirements and design parameters. The second test cycle served to prove the practicability of the template, comparing the teams' results with the realized solution.

Findings

Based on the teams' feedbacks, ten “easy‐to‐use” steps for the systematic design of lean production systems were developed. The guideline obtains the best results if used in combination with the value stream mapping concept.

Research limitations/implications

Apart from one case study in injection moulding, practical evaluations were focused on applications in the field of manual, hybrid or automated assembly systems, which perhaps limits the applicability of the presented approach in some machining processes.

Practical implications

Several successful implementations demonstrated the validity of the presented method in terms of results, planning time and user friendliness. Even students with nearly no practical experiences in production system design were able to present astonishing results within short timeframes.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need of a methodological guidance in the design of lean production systems and offers practical help to shorten the design times and improve the quality of the design results.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Åsa Fasth‐Berglund and Johan Stahre

The paper aims to discuss the importance of considering both the physical and cognitive automation when aiming for a flexible or reconfigurable assembly system. This is…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to discuss the importance of considering both the physical and cognitive automation when aiming for a flexible or reconfigurable assembly system. This is done in order to handle the increased demand for mass customized production and to maintain or improve the social sustainability within the company.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodologies used in this paper are a theoretical review about task allocation and levels of automation and a methodology called DYNAMO++ for the industrial case studies.

Findings

The paper provides both theoretical and empirical insights about the importance of considering both the cognitive and physical automation when aiming for a reconfigurable assembly system.

Research limitations/implications

The paper will only discuss the cognitive strategy from a social sustainability perspective and not from an economical or environmental angle.

Practical implications

The paper presents data from three industrial case studies, mostly in the automotive industry. The result points towards a need for a more structured and quantitative method when choosing automation solutions, furthermore an increased use of cognitive automation solution.

Social implications

The results from the case studies show that when the complexity and variety of products increases, a cognitive support for the operators is needed. This strengthens the theory of a need for a cognitive automation strategy within companies.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates an advance in the state of the art in task allocation. The concept model and the DYNAMO++ method can be seen as a step closer towards quantitative measures of task allocation (i.e. changes in both physical and cognitive LoA) and dynamic changes over time.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

D.T. Matt

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a design approach based on the investigation of the sensitivity of assembly systems to volume fluctuations as part of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a design approach based on the investigation of the sensitivity of assembly systems to volume fluctuations as part of the selection process of alternative design solutions for scalable assembly systems on the basis of a real industrial case study.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual approach for the (re‐)design of a scalable assembly system is developed on the basis of an industrial case research using axiomatic design (AD) for the top level structuring of the framework incorporating useful methods and insights obtained from a thorough literature review and from previous research work.

Findings

The findings of this research are limited due to the focused nature of a case study based research. However, the obtained results encourage assuming its transferability to similar problems.

Originality/value

Significant research has been done in the design of assembly systems for high product variety, but the review of literature in this field still identifies many opportunities for future research. This paper responds to the clearly identified research need of a methodological guidance regarding the design of scalable assembly systems and offers a practically proven help to improve the efficiency of the design process and the quality of the design results.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Thomas Frädrich, Julia Pachow‐Frauenhofer, Fiege Torsten and Peter Nyhuis

The purpose of this paper is to transfer the idea of changeability to a concrete technical application.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to transfer the idea of changeability to a concrete technical application.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the definition of changeability on a factory level, a transformation of the five change enablers specified therein for the work station level using the example of an aerodynamic feeding system takes place in this paper.

Findings

The observed aerodynamic feeding system can be determined as changeable.

Practical implications

Changeable systems are able to react with low effort to exterior influences, e.g. of the market, and thus represent a considerable competitive advantage.

Originality/value

The new element in this paper is the observation of change enablers on the work station level. This point of view enables the concrete figuration of changeable technical systems.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

D. Spath and M. Baumeister

The increasing demand for market‐oriented production leads to shorter product life‐cycles, growing product variety and, therefore, changing lot sizes. These critical lot…

Abstract

The increasing demand for market‐oriented production leads to shorter product life‐cycles, growing product variety and, therefore, changing lot sizes. These critical lot sizes vary greatly in number. Because of this, the question of whether or not to prioritize fully automated or manual assembly arises. The intention to meet the requirements of a turbulent market leads to hybrid assembly systems in which automated and manual assembly stations operate together flexibly. This hybrid system, supported by modular structures with defined interfaces and process software, allows a fast reaction to any change in products, variants and lot sizes. Owing to the difficulty in accessing materials, traditional assembly systems have a high contingent of non‐value adding procedures. By collecting materials in advance within one main area and distributing them to the work stations simultaneously for the production of a good, a minimized quantity of material is present on the assembly line, thus making the process more efficient.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Y.J. Lin and R. Farahati

This paper presents a versatile and economical knowledge‐based assembly design of blade and shell assemblies by employing behavioral modeling concepts. Behavioral modeling…

Abstract

This paper presents a versatile and economical knowledge‐based assembly design of blade and shell assemblies by employing behavioral modeling concepts. Behavioral modeling is a new generation CAD concept aimed at achieving ultimately optimum results with the efforts made in the early stage of the product development cycle. As a result, the assembly process of any odd‐configured parts such as torque converter blades, can be accurately planned, and made adaptable to all potential in‐process alterations due to either changes of components design or that of the assembly kinematics. Optimum assembly design is achieved when the volumetric interference meets a desired value based on an expert's determination. Experimental verification of the proposed optimum assembly design conducted in Luk, Inc. with two different blades' assemblies demonstrates satisfactory results.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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