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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

An interview with Joseph Pine II, co‐founder of Strategic Horizons LLP of Aurora, Ohio, USA, is co‐author of Authenticity: What Consumers Really Want and The Experience

Abstract

Purpose

An interview with Joseph Pine II, co‐founder of Strategic Horizons LLP of Aurora, Ohio, USA, is co‐author of Authenticity: What Consumers Really Want and The Experience Economy: Work is Theatre & Every Business a Stage.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent interviewer.

Findings

Joseph Pine II specializes in helping executives see the world differently, which he began with his first book, Mass Customization: The New Frontier in Business Competition. He encourages companies to focus on the five ways that they can most directly influence consumer perceptions, and the drive towards authenticity.

Originality/value

Provides strategic insights into why the most original minds in business win.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Jordi Loef, B. Joseph Pine II and Henry Robben

The article introduces practitioners to the concept and process of co-creating customization with buyers.

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Abstract

Purpose

The article introduces practitioners to the concept and process of co-creating customization with buyers.

Design/methodology/approach

This article offers a process and a model that mass market companies can use to take a scalable approach to involving customers in offering development, delivery and use.

Findings

Companies that co-create customization in a truly collaborative process enjoy significantly more sustainable competitive advantages.

Practical implications

For the company, co-creating leads to better offerings – including new capabilities that can be used with different customers in differing combinations – and also a more complete and clear picture of what its customers want.

Originality/value

The article introduces the co-creation customization model and nine strategies practitioners can use to provide individualized customer value.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 October 2019

B. Joseph Pine II

As information technology and digital networking advances, success increasingly means designing offerings that respond to customers as the unique individuals they are …

Abstract

Purpose

As information technology and digital networking advances, success increasingly means designing offerings that respond to customers as the unique individuals they are – whether consumers or corporations – with specific needs and preferences. “Customering seeks to create a customized offering that meets the individual wants, needs and desires of each particular customer, both at a specific moment in time and on into a future relationship”.

Design/methodology/approach

Customering starts with the customer – not the product – and pulls together intelligence about the wants, needs and desires of this individual customer before you determine what to sell.

Findings

To practice customering successfully companies pull intelligence from individual customers – so that the information will benefit that particular customer – and then pull the offerings through its own operations to meet an individual customer’s needs.

Practical implications

To practice customering, companies also must surround their offerings with experiences that draw potential customers in, engage them in the process of discovery and help them see the possibilities in the relationship.

Originality/value

Article introduces the reader to the concept of customering, a radical strategic model proposed by the author who introduced S&L readers to “mass customization” and “experience marketing.” Customering must be customer-centric: that means placing the one who pays you money at the center of everything you do.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 47 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2020

B. Joseph Pine II

The author’s thesis is that today we have transitioned from a Service Economy to an Experience Economy, . What customers increasingly want are experiences – memorable…

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Abstract

Purpose

The author’s thesis is that today we have transitioned from a Service Economy to an Experience Economy, . What customers increasingly want are experiences – memorable events that engage each individual in an inherently personal way. And if companies want to create and consistently offer engagement experience value, then they need to give their employees the wherewithal to design, create and stage such offerings through an employee experience that is equally personal, memorable and of course engaging. 10;

Design/methodology/approach

The author suggests that we think of the customer/employee relationship as the experience profit chain, one that interacts in multiple and complex ways to yield a connected human experience.

Findings

Better employee experience leads to the creation of a better experience for customers, which feeds back to enabling a more engaging employee experience. Separate employee experiences from customer experiences and it will become increasingly hard to create the economic value desired by customers today.

Practical implications

The employee experience depends on how well companies design the time employees spend that creates value for customers.

Originality/value

Seminal article that analyzes and offers guidance on how to formulate the relationship between customer experience and employee experience.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 48 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

James H. Gilmore and B. Joseph Pine

Marketing flounders at many companies today, as people have become relatively immune to messages broadcast at them. The way to reach customers is to create an experience…

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Abstract

Marketing flounders at many companies today, as people have become relatively immune to messages broadcast at them. The way to reach customers is to create an experience they can participate in and enjoy, the new offering frontier. To be clear, this article is not about “experiential marketing” – that is, giving marketing promotions more sensory appeal by adding imagery, tactile materials, motion, scents, sounds, or other sensations. Rather, as a key part of their marketing programs companies should create experience places – absorbing, entertaining real or virtual locations – where customers can try out offerings as they immerse themselves in the experience. Companies should not stop at creating just one experience place; marketers should investigate the location hierarchy model to learn how to design a series of related experiences that flow one from another, creating demand up and down at every level. These various real and virtual experiences generate new forms of revenue and drive sales of whatever the company currently offers. When experience places are done well, potential customers can’t help but pay attention – and the leading companies find that customers are willing to pay for the experiences.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

B. Joseph Pine and James H. Gilmore

The authors describe and explain the progression of economic value, showing that customizing a good turns it into a service, customizing a service turns it into an…

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Abstract

The authors describe and explain the progression of economic value, showing that customizing a good turns it into a service, customizing a service turns it into an experience, and customizing an experience turns it into a transformation. Businesses that wish to prosper in the emerging experience economy should begin by mass customizing their goods and services. To determine which products to customize, many companies gather customer satisfaction or “voice of the customer” surveys that use market research techniques to get data. However, these techniques do not go far enough to determine what and where a company should mass customize, because customer satisfaction measures market, not individual customer, satisfaction. The authors conclude by presenting their 3‐S Model that shows the importance of driving up customer satisfaction and driving down customer sacrifice as a foundation for effectively instigating customer surprise.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

B. Joseph Pine

In his keynote presentation “An Age of Instability?” Peter Schwartz, president of the Global Business Network and world‐renowned scenario planner, began by asking the…

Abstract

In his keynote presentation “An Age of Instability?” Peter Schwartz, president of the Global Business Network and world‐renowned scenario planner, began by asking the audience how many thought their children's lives would be better than their own. A scant 10 percent raised their hands—a very different picture than would have been the case in past decades. This overwhelming pessimism is grounded in one of two disparate scenarios Schwartz outlined as likely for the year 2000. The hopeful and pessimistic signals driving these two scenarios are shown in Exhibit 1.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

B. Joseph Pine

For better or worse, the business world of today is vastly different than it was a decade ago or even just a few years ago. The amount of uncertainty, instability, and…

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Abstract

For better or worse, the business world of today is vastly different than it was a decade ago or even just a few years ago. The amount of uncertainty, instability, and lack of control that firms have in their business environments—the market turbulence—has increased dramatically for companies in almost every industry. So much so, in fact, that the old ways of competing simply do not work any more.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

B. Joseph Pine and Thomas W. Pietrocini

Bally Engineered Structures, Inc. has figured out how to mass customize many different types of end products—such as walk‐in coolers, freezers, insulated outdoor…

Abstract

Bally Engineered Structures, Inc. has figured out how to mass customize many different types of end products—such as walk‐in coolers, freezers, insulated outdoor structures, refrigerated warehouses, and environmentally controlled rooms—based on a set of standard panel modules and accessories that can be put together in a virtually limitless number of ways to meet the needs of individual customers.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

B. Joseph Pine and James H. Gilmore

As more companies wrap their offering with “an experience,” it is important that experience authenticity is understood to be a critical consumer sensibility. This paper

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Abstract

Purpose

As more companies wrap their offering with “an experience,” it is important that experience authenticity is understood to be a critical consumer sensibility. This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have studied experience marketing and found that consumers often choose to buy or not buy based on how genuine they perceive an offering to be. The authors warn that fakery, phoniness, or manipulation that becomes associated with your offering will harm your brand.

Findings

The paper finds that executives must learn to understand, manage, and excel at delivering authenticity. So how can leaders tell the difference between bogus and authentic business opportunities?

Research limitations/implications

A short case study of the Walt Disney Company shows that authenticity will not result when a company strives for a strategic position that is inimical to its traditions.

Practical implications

The execution zone is the set of decisions and actions that a company can make and still be perceived as true to self. For companies that try to operate outside their execution zone there is little likelihood that the resultant offerings will be perceived as authentic. Managers can learn to use eight principles to guide them in delineating where exactly your own “execution zone” lies, and thereby stake out viable, powerful, and compelling competitive positions.

Originality/value

To discover your company's authentic opportunities, use the eight principles to peer into your future until you determine where you should go. And then treat that future not as a destination but as a guide to the path before you.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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