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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

D. Vizman, B. Fischer, J. Friedrich and G. Müller

Being extensively used in metallurgy, rotating magnetic fields are also becoming increasingly interesting for application in crystal growth, where they are intended to act…

Abstract

Being extensively used in metallurgy, rotating magnetic fields are also becoming increasingly interesting for application in crystal growth, where they are intended to act by stabilizing the melt flow. For this purpose, it is important to understand the basic interactions of the magnetically induced flow and other flow components like time‐dependent buoyant convection. So a three‐dimensional finite volume method was developed in order to numerically study the effect of a rotating magnetic field on convection in a cylindrical melt volume. The equations of mass, momentum, and heat transport are solved together with the potential equations describing the electromagnetic field. The numerical computation of the Lorenz force distribution is validated by comparison with an analytical solution. The effects of magnetic field parameters on the temperature distributions and the flow patterns in the considered configurations are analysed.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

John Farley, Shawn Vasdev, Benedikt Fischer, Jürgen Rehm and Emma Haydon

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major public health concern in Canada, which now mostly affects marginalized populations, including correctional inmates. These…

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major public health concern in Canada, which now mostly affects marginalized populations, including correctional inmates. These populations ‐ until recently ‐ have largely been excluded from HCV pharmacotherapy. We report preliminary data on HCV treatment in a federal correctional population sample in British Columbia (BC), using Pegetron combination therapy. HCV RNA results are presented at week 12 of treatment, a strong predictor of treatment outcome. Just over four‐fifths (80.8%) of inmate patients had no detectable HCV RNA at week 12; inmates with genotype 2 and 3 fared better than those with genotype 1. These preliminary results suggest that HCV treatment is feasible and promises to be efficacious in correctional populations.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

P. Wach, R. Modre, B. Tilg and G. Fischer

A promising approach for the solution of the electrocardiographic inverse problem is the calculation of the cardiac activation sequence from body surface potential (BSP…

Abstract

A promising approach for the solution of the electrocardiographic inverse problem is the calculation of the cardiac activation sequence from body surface potential (BSP) mapping data. Here, a two‐fold regularization scheme is applied in order to stabilize the inverse solution of this intrinsically ill‐posed problem. The solution of the inverse problem is defined by the minimum of a non‐linear cost function. The L‐curve method can be applied for regularization parameter determination. Solving the optimization problem by a Newton‐like method, the L‐curve may be of pronged shape. Then a numerically unique determination of the optimal regularization parameter will become difficult. This problem can be avoided applying an iterative linearized algorithm. It is shown that activation time imaging due to temporal and spatial regularization is stable with respect to large model errors. Even neglecting cardiac anisotropy in activation time imaging results in an acceptable inverse solution.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Barrie O. Pettman and Richard Dobbins

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Abstract

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Herbert De Gersem, Markus Wilke, Markus Clemens and Thomas Weiland

Certain sophisticated boundary conditions offer powerful modelling features for many electrotechnical models. Their application, however, wipes out the particular…

Abstract

Certain sophisticated boundary conditions offer powerful modelling features for many electrotechnical models. Their application, however, wipes out the particular structure of the system matrices which occurs when structured grids are applied. In this paper, this effect is prevented by considering the unconstrained system together with additional constraint equations or by projecting the algebraic system using an oblique or orthogonal projector. The numerical tests indicate that the efficiency of sparse iterative solvers can be preserved even in the presence of complicated boundary relations. The described projections are also advantageous for formulations derived for unstructured grids.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2017

Natalie A. Mitchell, Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Dan Li and Wan Wang

The objective is to extend the concept of purse parties introduced by Gosline (2009) and to explore the phenomenon of counterfeit consumption through the in-home “purse…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective is to extend the concept of purse parties introduced by Gosline (2009) and to explore the phenomenon of counterfeit consumption through the in-home “purse parties” channel. The authors seek to reveal themes from the depth interviews and build a consumer typology reflecting attitudes toward purse parties and counterfeit luxury products.

Method/approach

The method is a qualitative phenomenological approach. Authors assessed attitudes toward purse party attendance and counterfeit goods – along with any subsequent behavioral intentions or behaviors. Authors addressed the objective using depth interviews among 28 women.

Findings

Findings included five emerging themes: distinctness of in-home consumption settings, obligatory attendance, social engagement, curiosity, and disregard for legalities of counterfeit consumption/disdain for purse parties.

Research limitations

The sample primarily consists of female colleges students and is not representative of all consumers. Due to social desirability bias and the controversial nature of counterfeit consumption, informants may have struggled to provide honest responses.

Social implications

Research implications suggest potential increases in purse party events and consumption due to informant’s blatant disregard for the legalities of the practice, and interests in social engagement, intimacy (exclusivity), and curiosity.

Originality/value

The main contribution is a typology representing four types of purse party consumers: loyal, curious/social, skeptic, and disengaged. This proposed typology stems from the aforementioned themes uncovered. Further, authors identify the social implications of in-home purse parties and underscore the significance of an under-investigated purchase channel.

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Udo Müller, Gilbert Ahamer, Holger Peters, Elisabeth Weinke, Norbert Sapper and Elvira Salcher

The purpose of this publication is to present a didactic concept with the targeted impact of a positive future vision. This paper reflects the effect of local educational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this publication is to present a didactic concept with the targeted impact of a positive future vision. This paper reflects the effect of local educational action on the development of regionally optimised visions in rural regions of a European industrial state, compared with a rural region in the developing country of Senegal.

Design/methodology/approach

An assessment and analysis of two conceptual approaches to education and technology is conducted with a view to participating in a future multicultural participatory design process, and identifying the chances that communities have to build future‐oriented structures that support local roots and development.

Findings

In the short‐term, the technological and material results are the targeted localisation of a windmill in the (physical and cultural) countryside. In the long‐term, educative and social results are expected to strengthen local civil society, which is initiated by empowering students through their self‐responsibility in the Alpine region of Greifenburg, Austria. The “windmill” in the region is a publicly visible sign and a technology‐based icon in the landscape, based on local consensus on several levels and inspiring further regional consensus on energy, climate protection and its active creation through entrepreneurship in civil society.

Originality/value

Technology serves as a catalyst to trigger social cohesion among multiple cultures in a region and to enhance conviviality.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 7 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Gilbert Ahamer

This article aims to explain why geography is a prime discipline for analysing globalisation and a multicultural view of Global Studies. The generic approach of human…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explain why geography is a prime discipline for analysing globalisation and a multicultural view of Global Studies. The generic approach of human geography to first select an appropriate methodology is taken as a key approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Concepts from aggregate disciplines such as history, economics, and geography are scanned through during a short description of the historical genesis of these sciences and the paradigmatic shifts they have encountered.

Findings

There are four main theses: (1) values are created by appreciation; (2) development is growing jointly with responsibility; (3) accumulation of material value is seen as expenditure to achieve non‐material values; and (4) spatial relations are interrelated with social relations.

Research limitations/implications

Conceptual considerations have to be further corroborated by quantitative analyses using suitable metrics of “development”.

Practical implications

“Social and cultural geography” should contribute to any curriculum of “Global Studies”.

Social implications

Dialogue and discourse between world views is the essential, ideology‐free approach for understanding globalisation.

Originality/value

Unlike other scientific articles focusing on “facts”, this article focuses on perspectives. Thus, it explains “multi‐perspectivity” and a multi‐paradigmatic approach.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 7 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

As ways of business have evolved over the years, so too has the nature of teams. We have always designed for cooperation; however, the type of groups we use has changed over the decades. This article provides two examples of very contrasting types of teams from industry.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Marie Gubbins, Denis Harrington and Peter Hines

The purpose of this paper is to draw on literature underpinning social support to explore individual level considerations when designing social support systems for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw on literature underpinning social support to explore individual level considerations when designing social support systems for academic entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws from literature in the fields of entrepreneurship, organisational support, stress and coping, and conservation of resources theory to conceptualise social support in an academic entrepreneurship setting.

Findings

Provides an expanded definition and a framework of social support. The definition signals the complex nature of delivering social support by considering mechanisms through which the concept is operationalised. These include the content of social support, relationships it occurs within, mode of delivery of support and finally outcomes of such support. A social support influencer pentagram is presented of elements that, together, or separately may affect how individuals seek, receive or perceive support in the academic entrepreneurship context. The framework may also have implications for organisations in other contexts.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should explore the content, delivery mode and timing of support sought and/or received and perceived as helpful and the types of relationships within which these might occur. The impact of this on academic entrepreneurship and variation of these inputs and outputs with respect to the types of actors involved should be considered. It underscores the need, in empirical research, for in-depth understanding of the context of each incident of support regardless of organisational context.

Practical implications

This paper illustrates the challenges of designing a supportive culture and the conceptual contribution forewarns policy makers of the need to design multi-faceted, flexible and adaptive social support systems.

Originality/value

This paper seeks to establish the value and complex nature of social support as a medium to encourage academic entrepreneurship by providing a broader definition of social support and a framework of elements that may affect whether individuals seek, receive or perceive support within the academic entrepreneurship setting. To our knowledge, it is one of the first papers in an academic entrepreneurship setting which recognises the dual separate paths [based on stress and coping theory (Lazarus and Folkman, 1984) and conservation of resources theory (Hobfoll, 1989)] from the perception of support and the objective support itself to entrepreneurial outcomes. The proposed framework also seeks to contribute to a greater understanding of the ways in which social systems might influence the success of an individual academic’s entrepreneurial endeavours and those of others with whom they interact. It also contributes to the wider social support literature by providing a better understanding of how individuals might break resource loss spirals (Hobfoll et al., 2018).

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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