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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2019

Anu M. Ojala

This study reviews the literature on business-school (b-school) competition and competitiveness to extend our understanding of b-schools’ competitive strategies.

Abstract

Purpose

This study reviews the literature on business-school (b-school) competition and competitiveness to extend our understanding of b-schools’ competitive strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Both content and network analysis were used in the examination of the scholarly discourse.

Findings

The analyses distinguish three literature streams. The first concentrates on resources, capabilities and competencies; the second focuses on measures of competitiveness; and the third includes competitive dynamics and strategy discourse. The analysis shows that the conceptions of competitiveness are quite coherent concerning resources, capabilities and competencies. However, in the “measures of competitiveness” and “industry dynamics and strategy,” discourses were more diverse, indicating greater ambiguity in how the core competencies, capabilities and resources are portrayed as competitiveness outside the institutions. The literature suggests that the measures and indicators of competitiveness are ambiguous to external stakeholders and, furthermore, reflect institutional goal ambiguity.

Originality/value

The question of how, and to what extent, increasing competition in management education and research catalyzes unwelcome changes in the industry has been of great concern to management educators and scholars. This has given rise to a considerable body of literature referring to b-school competition. Despite its topicality, this discourse has remained theoretically fragmented and separate from the mainstream strategy literature. Therefore, this study provides a review and critical discussion of the current state of research on b-school competition, as well as proposes avenues for future research and tools for strategic management of b-schools.

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

P. Shahaida, H. Rajashekar and R. Nargundkar

MBA education in India is facing the same challenges as business. Upheaval of technology, changing customer expectations, global competition, online courses and societal…

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Abstract

Purpose

MBA education in India is facing the same challenges as business. Upheaval of technology, changing customer expectations, global competition, online courses and societal responsibility are the major concerns. Failure to adapt to these challenges will question the academic contribution to business practice. Business school (B‐school) branding is crucial to distinguish the services provided by one B‐school from another. Considering the importance and relevance of adapting to the changing market forces, the purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual model of brand‐building for Indian B‐schools.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of published literature related to the topic is thoroughly searched. The paper examines the viewpoints of various scholars with regard to the role of a student in a B‐school. The services marketing perspective is analyzed and the gaps are identified through a robust literature survey. Based on the literature survey, an original conceptual model for brand‐building for B‐schools is proposed.

Findings

Some B‐schools have adopted certain branding activities, but extant literature review reveals that B‐schools in India do not practice an organized holistic approach to branding activities.

Originality/value

The proposed conceptual model is stage one in the process of understanding what goes into building a B‐school brand. Stage two would empirically test the proposed conceptual model of brand‐building. The proposed model is holistic, considering the role of important stakeholders such as students, faculty and corporate. This conceptual model will help B‐school management to understand the role and importance of branding B‐schools. It will provide an insight into the various parameters on which a B‐school brand has to be built.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2020

Sudhir Rana, Arpan Anand, Sanjeev Prashar and Moon Moon Haque

We respond to calls from business schools (B-schools), apex education bodies, regulators, activist groups and researchers for more rigorous research to understand the…

Abstract

Purpose

We respond to calls from business schools (B-schools), apex education bodies, regulators, activist groups and researchers for more rigorous research to understand the future strategies of B-schools in India. We specifically examine the challenges posed by the current COVID-19 pandemic (and possible future similar eventualities) and the current and long-term strategies being planned to combat such crises.

Design/methodology/approach

To reveal the real-life scenario, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 academic leaders (Deans and Directors) of B-schools in India. These respondents were from both public and private institutions across the country. Open-ended questions were framed for exploration to help the authors understand the way forward in the Indian B-school context.

Findings

Findings reveal that B-schools in India are preparing themselves to overcome short-term challenges faced due to COVID-19 as well as transforming themselves through long-term strategies.

Originality/value

The study outlines strategic plans for some imaginative reassessments that B-schools may consider as a reaction to a pandemic-like emergency. The focus is on distinguishing the imperatives, creating a key guide for meeting immediate requirements, allotting assets in a prudent way to update educational course curricula and teaching methods and building the required academic infrastructure. The ability to focus on enduring changes (e.g. creating an e-learning framework and providing a safe and secure learning environment to students as per government mandates) will provide B-schools with a new lease of life in the future.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

S. Sreekumar and S.S. Mahapatra

The main purpose of the present study is to develop an integrated approach combining data envelopment analysis (DEA) and neural network (NN) for assessment and prediction…

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Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of the present study is to develop an integrated approach combining data envelopment analysis (DEA) and neural network (NN) for assessment and prediction of performance of Indian B‐schools for effective decision making as error and biasness due to human intervention in decision making is appreciably reduced.

Design/methodology/approach

DEA, being a robust mathematical tool, has been employed to evaluate the efficiency of B‐schools. DEA, basically, takes into account the input and output components of a decision‐making unit (DMU) to calculate technical efficiency (TE). TE is treated as an indicator for performance of DMUs and comparison has been made among them. A sensitivity analysis has been carried out to study robustness of the ranking of schools obtained through DEA. Finally, NN is used to predict the efficiency when changes in inputs are caused due to market dynamism so that effective strategies can be evolved by the managers with limited available data.

Findings

A total of 49 Indian B‐schools are chosen for benchmarking purpose. The average score of efficiency is 0.625 with a standard deviation of 0.175 when Charnes, Cooper and Rhodes (CCR) model is used. Similarly, when the Banker, Charnes and Cooper (BCC) model is used the average score is 0.888 with a standard deviation of 0.063. The rank order correlation coefficient between the efficiency ranking obtained through CCR and BCC model is 0.736 (p=0.000) which is significant. The peer group and peer weights for the inefficient B‐schools have been identified. This is useful for benchmarking for the inefficient DMUs. They can identify the parameters in which they lack and take necessary steps for improvement. The peer group for the inefficient B‐schools indicates the efficient B‐schools to which the inefficient B‐schools are closer in its combination of inputs and outputs. The TE obtained through DEA is used as output variable along with input variables considered in DEA as input and output parameters in a generalized regression NN during training phase. It can be observed that root mean square error is 0.009344 and 0.02323 for CCR‐ and BCC‐efficiency prediction, respectively, during training. Similarly, root mean square error is 0.08585 and 0.03279 for CCR‐ and BCC‐efficiency prediction, respectively, during testing. Now, individual schools can generate scenario with the data within their control and test their own performance through NN model.

Originality/value

This work proposes integration of DEA and NN to assist the managers to predict the performance of an individual DMU based on input consumed and generate various “what‐if” scenarios. The study provides a simple but comprehensive methodology for improving performance of B‐schools in India.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 October 2018

Dorota Dobija, Anna Maria Górska and Anna Pikos

The purpose of this paper is to extend the understanding of how internal organisational processes change in response to external demands, by investigating the changes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the understanding of how internal organisational processes change in response to external demands, by investigating the changes undertaken by two Polish business schools (b-schools) in anticipation of and in response to the demands of accreditation agencies (AAs) and other powerful stakeholders. Specifically, it examines the internal research-related performance measurement (PM) system and changes in the use of performance information (PI).

Design/methodology/approach

The case study method is adopted, using data from publicly available documents and interviews with the faculty and management at the two schools. The data are interpreted and analysed using the neo-institutional theory.

Findings

Powerful stakeholders are the primary reason for changes in PM systems and the manner in which PI is used. Specifically, AAs reflect an additional layer in the PM system, allowing for a downward cascading PI effect. This also leads to a wider use of PI across different organisational levels.

Research limitations/implications

This study focusses on two case studies in a region still undergoing transition. Thus, this analysis could be reinforced through additional cases, different data collection methods and cross-country and between-country comparative analyses.

Originality/value

The changes in PM systems and particularly the use of PI are discussed in the context of Polish higher education (HE) and, more broadly, the entire Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) region. Moreover, the consideration of two b-school cases facilitates a comparative analysis of the differences in PM systems and the use of PI in the context of stakeholders’ PI needs.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 September 2020

Maria Gribling and Joanne Duberley

The purpose of this article is to compare the effects of global competitive pressures on the UK and French B-schools' management systems through the lens of career ecosystems.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to compare the effects of global competitive pressures on the UK and French B-schools' management systems through the lens of career ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative inquiry employing in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 44 business school academics in the two countries.

Findings

This paper demonstrates the importance of top-down and bottom-up ecosystem influences for creating contrasting performance management systems in competitive B-schools in the two countries, to different outcomes for institutions and faculty careers.

Research limitations/implications

The authors focus on faculty working in top business schools, which limits the generalizability of the findings. Future research could apply the ecosystem lens to other institutions and geographical areas to highlight best practices and evaluate their transferability across borders.

Practical implications

The study highlights alternative HR practices and potentially workable adjustments to current systems that could be envisaged in order to enhance performance of individuals and institutions without jeopardizing the chances of valuable human resources to bring their contributions to the success of B-schools.

Originality/value

This paper compares and contrasts different performance management systems, taking into account exogenous and endogenous influences on B-schools that operate in a highly competitive and rapidly changing global management education market.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2022

Ajit Kumar

Case-based classroom teaching-learning process (hereafter, case method) has provided a very productive teaching-learning environment for a long time. In the case method…

Abstract

Purpose

Case-based classroom teaching-learning process (hereafter, case method) has provided a very productive teaching-learning environment for a long time. In the case method, students are expected to meet some prerequisites, such as reading and analyzing the case in advance, listening to the classroom discussion and actively participating in the discussion. However, it is frequently reported in Indian business schools that students do not prepare the assigned case before the scheduled class. The under-preparation of cases results in low-quality discussion, high absenteeism, passive attitude and lack of energy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study modeled the case method using an IGEO (input-guide-enablers-output, commonly used in any process modeling) framework to identify challenges in the case-based classroom teaching-learning process. A novel customized classroom teaching-learning process called the EPDE (explain, practice, discuss, explore) method replaced the case method. These two teaching-learning processes were used for teaching two groups of MBA students.

Findings

The novel EPDE method effectively addressed the case method challenges. It resulted in better learning outcomes in the Indian B-school context.

Originality/value

The purpose of the study is to examine the impact of an alternative to the traditional case study method in a college classroom among MBA students. Two points make this study original and unique: (1) The IGOE process modeling framework is used to model teaching-learning processes, such as the case and EPDE methods. Using IGOE for teaching-learning processes is unique and is not available in the literature and (2) the EPDE method is a novel concept.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 29 March 2022

Sabita Mahapatra and Shubhadeep Basak

The learning outcomes are as follows: introduce the concept of the decision-making process, decision-making unit and hierarchy of effects and marketing strategy; identify…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes are as follows: introduce the concept of the decision-making process, decision-making unit and hierarchy of effects and marketing strategy; identify the critical aspect of segmentation, targeting and positioning; and highlight the critical element of pricing and communication media.

Case overview/synopsis

In early January 2017, Mr Ashish and Mr Rahul, co-founders of Biziga, a company engaged in training through simulation for management education, was at crossroads. Keeping in view the challenges of the emerging Indian market, Biziga envisioned creating participant-centric business learning simulations. The initial responses and feedback received from several top B-schools were promising. However, the euphoria did not last long. Biziga retained only a few of its initial clients from the Tier-1 B-schools who had adopted the product. But the response received from other categories of B-schools was not very encouraging. Acquiring new clients from these institutes was the major challenge. The founders of Biziga had differences in their thought about the strategic path they should pursue to achieve future growth. There were several options to achieve the goal of a target revenue of INR 1bn in the next five years and be known as a virtual gamification company with a complete bundle of business simulation products. They had to finalize for the financial year 2017-18 the most feasible and promising option/s that would have a long-term impact on the company’s future growth and success in the upcoming meeting scheduled in the last week of February 2017.

Complexity academic level

Postgraduate students and executive students.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2021

Kishore Thomas John and K. Shreekrishna Kumar

Kerala is one of India's most advanced states in human development and other social indices. This study aims to look at the management education scenario in Kerala from a…

Abstract

Purpose

Kerala is one of India's most advanced states in human development and other social indices. This study aims to look at the management education scenario in Kerala from a macro-perspective and examines the existing trends, major issues and present challenges facing the sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is driven by previously unexplored secondary data published by India's apex technical education regulator–All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE). Qualitative and quantitative assessments are assimilated from the organization, dissection and categorization of unit-level data.

Findings

Business schools (B-schools) in the state are facing acute distress in enrolments. There are intra-regional variations in institution count and occupancy rates. The vast majority of the institutions have no accreditation at all. The entire sector is facing a protracted decline.

Research limitations/implications

The study has relied primarily on descriptive statistics considering a single discipline within the higher education sector in Kerala. Future studies should look at other disciplines (engineering, medicine) simultaneously. Use of statistical methods like panel data regression would be beneficial to find hidden trends in cross-sectional and longitudinal time-series data.

Practical implications

Management education in Kerala is facing an existential crisis. This has implications for the state's economic development. The paper creates strong imperatives for government policymaking to forestall the complete decline of the sector.

Social implications

A highly literate state with advanced human development indices need not be a suitable location for building a knowledge-based economy. Government policy has strong implications for the development and sustenance of higher education. The relationship between government and business schools are symbiotic.

Originality/value

The paper maps the progression of B-schools from local to global. A typology of privately funded B-schools is proposed. The conceptual framework advanced in this study can contribute to further literature development. The suggested policy initiatives are applicable not only to Kerala but also to other tightly regulated markets.

Details

Rajagiri Management Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-9968

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Manju P. George and Sebastian Rupert Mampilly

The essence of management education lies in preparing and enabling the students to evolve cognitively, affectively and behaviorally into capable ones equipped to meet and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The essence of management education lies in preparing and enabling the students to evolve cognitively, affectively and behaviorally into capable ones equipped to meet and manage challenges from within and outside their organisations or workplaces. Mentoring, as pedagogy, results in enhancing effectiveness of B‐schools (Institutions offering MBA program) in ensuring the transformation of students into professionals. The purpose of this paper is to analyze and evaluate the formal and teacher‐initiated student mentoring in B‐schools in Kerala in terms of the designated activities, to establish effectiveness of mentoring as outcomes of faculty‐related antecedents and mentoring activities, and to demonstrate the effectiveness in terms of the psycho‐social changes of students.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employed a conclusive approach that combined the features of descriptive and explanatory research designs. The respondents of the study comprised 141 permanent teachers, 327 first‐year students and 318 final‐year students enrolled in the management programs of 19 B‐schools in Kerala that had minimum five years of existence and approval of the All India Council of Technical Education (AICTE).

Findings

The study revealed that less than half of the B‐schools had implemented a mentoring program as part of their pedagogy. A structural equation model using the partial least square technique validated the conceptual model and the findings revealed that socio‐demographic characteristics, mentoring activities (teach the job, provide challenge, teach politics, career help, sponsor, career counseling and trust) influenced effectiveness of mentoring.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted only among B‐schools, hence the research results may lack generalization. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed model further.

Practical Implications

The paper includes a conceptual framework employed for bringing about effectiveness of mentoring, proven to be valid and may be considered by B‐schools that are institutionalizing mentoring as an element of the pedagogy.

Originality/value

The paper bridges the perceptible lack of theoretical and empirical bases to explain the dynamics of student mentoring in management institutes in the country and will be an eye‐opener to management institutions which have not incorporated mentoring as part of their pedagogy.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

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