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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2021

Oluyemi Theophilus Adeosun and Ayodele Ibrahim Shittu

This study examines the nexus between entrepreneurship through small–medium enterprise (SME) business formation and the growth of the Nigerian economy. Furthermore, this…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the nexus between entrepreneurship through small–medium enterprise (SME) business formation and the growth of the Nigerian economy. Furthermore, this paper seeks to explore the link between small enterprise development and econo.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focused on secondary data for the period 1990–2016 for macro parameters including, registered small and medium scale enterprise, nominal gross domestic product, employment, total labor force and population. Forecasting technique was applied to obtain data for missing trends. Quantitative analytical techniques used include the dynamic method of the error correction model (ECM) and Johansen co-integration test for a long-run correlation.

Findings

The result shows an increasing number of SME formation which has also led to the growth of the economy. However, an increase in the amount of micro-small and medium scale enterprises did not contribute to the development of the economy more than existing businesses. The employment elasticity is positive and significant and shows that the contribution of entrepreneurship regarding employment is the most essential factor that advances economic growth and reduction of unemployment.

Originality/value

The paper examines how the persistent increase in small and medium enterprise formation improves the growth and development of the Nigerian economy, employing the ECM approach.

Details

Review of Economics and Political Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2356-9980

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Oluyemi Theophilus Adeosun, Ayodele Ibrahim Shittu and Temitope J. Owolabi

As the 4th industrial revolution (4IR) unfolds, there is an increasing awareness that its implications for workforce transformation and shifts in workforce demand will…

Abstract

Purpose

As the 4th industrial revolution (4IR) unfolds, there is an increasing awareness that its implications for workforce transformation and shifts in workforce demand will profoundly impact the future of work. Specifically, the paper seeks to answer the following research questions: i) how does Students’ Industrial Work Experience Scheme (SIWES) equip young people for the real world of work, especially in the era of the third industrial revolution?; ii) does SIWES support the exposure of young people to the world of digitalization?; and iii) what are the effects of the SIWES exposure on the employability of young people? This paper aims to evaluate the University Internship system and preparation of young people for the world of work in the 4th industrial revolution.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a mixed method to unravel the objectives of this study, that is, quantitative and qualitative methods. For the former, structured questionnaires were used to elicit a response from 249 young people drawn from tertiary institutions across Lagos State, Nigeria. The latter used an in-depth interview method conducted among 45 respondents (25 employers of labor and 20 lecturers).

Findings

The findings reveal that: SIWES contributes meaningfully to the advancement of knowledge and capacity building among young people; SIWES exposes young people to the world of digitalization, depending on the organization where the internship takes place; and SIWES pays little attention to financial rewards and more attention to the acquisition of skills that are relevant to the world of work. The practical and policy implications of the findings are critically discussed.

Originality/value

This paper critically evaluates the SIWES policy amidst the growing threats of widening skills gap, greater inequality and broader polarization.

Details

Rajagiri Management Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-9968

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 March 2021

Oluyemi Theophilus Adeosun and Ayodele Ibrahim Shittu

The birth and survival rate of youth-owned businesses has been a major concern for policymakers, industry and academics alike. Learning and innovation play important roles…

Abstract

Purpose

The birth and survival rate of youth-owned businesses has been a major concern for policymakers, industry and academics alike. Learning and innovation play important roles and more critical is the mediating factors and how it impacts the enterprise competitiveness of youth-owned businesses and hence worth studying. Therefore, this study aims to examine the impact of mediating factors such as government support, informal network society and external knowledge infrastructure on learning and innovation in youth-owned small businesses in Lagos, Nigeria, from a cross-sectional perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Leveraging the sectoral system of innovation theory, we use a primary research method and data obtained from a structured questionnaire administered among a sample of 1,000 registered youth-owned small businesses in Lagos, while 30 in-depth interviews were also conducted. The exploratory factor analysis was used for data examination.

Findings

The findings show that even though government support, informal network society and external knowledge all have a positive relationship with learning and innovation in youth-owned small businesses, government support has the most impactful impact. The informal network society via a trade association, professional network and social media are also critical in knowledge transfer in youth-owned businesses.

Originality/value

The significance of learning and innovation is more important as many small businesses do not have the privilege of standard human resource management (HRM) systems. This paper looks at the mediating factors affecting the introduction of innovative practices in youth-owned and managed small businesses and how productivity is enabled in a developing county context.

Details

Rajagiri Management Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-9968

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Oluyemi Theophilus Adeosun, Ayodele Ibrahim Shittu and Stellamaris Ifunanya Aju

This paper aims to explore how women entrepreneurs in informal settings, especially in the fishing sub-sector in rural communities, relate to different dimensions of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how women entrepreneurs in informal settings, especially in the fishing sub-sector in rural communities, relate to different dimensions of innovation. Specifically, this paper examines how women entrepreneurs engage in process, managerial and technological innovations. This paper also examines how they fund their business, develop their products across the value chain innovatively and how it influences their business output and welfare.

Design/methodology/approach

A face-to-face structured interview was administered among 100 women entrepreneurs in the fishing agriculture sub-sector in the Anam community, Anambra East LGA, in Anambra State. The study uses the multiple logistic regression model, descriptive analysis technique and it is quantitative in approach. The research is situated within the Local Innovation Systems and adopts diffusion innovation theory.

Findings

The study established the following: level of education and learning capabilities are significant predictors of process innovation capabilities among women-owned enterprise in informal settings; level of education, years of fishing experience and learning capabilities are significant predictors of technological innovation capabilities among women-owned enterprise in informal settings; and level of education is the only significant predictor of management innovation capabilities among women-owned enterprise in informal settings.

Originality/value

This paper focuses attention on the issue of innovation by women who operate in the informal sector of the fishing sub-sector in the agricultural value chain with attention for their productivity and welfare.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 May 2021

Sucheta Agarwal, Anugamini P. Srivastava and Vivek Agrawal

Abstract

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2021

Ewald Kuoribo, De-Graft Owusu-Manu, Roland Yomoah, Caleb Debrah, Alex Acheampong and David John Edwards

The construction industry is an enabler of economic growth in developing countries, but its performance is governed by the professional behaviour of construction…

Abstract

Purpose

The construction industry is an enabler of economic growth in developing countries, but its performance is governed by the professional behaviour of construction professionals. Unethical behaviour (UB) breaches codes of practice and undermines economic performance hence, ubiquitous academic attention has been given to understanding this phenomenon. This paper aims to contribute to the ensuing discourse by reporting upon the most critical ethical behaviours (EBs and UBs) of professionals in the Ghanaian construction industry (GCI).

Design/methodology/approach

The study compounded identified factors into a closed-ended questionnaire in a quantitative research strategy. Data analysis was conducted using the relative importance index and one sample t-test. To measure the reliability of the scale, Cronbach’s alpha was used, which indicated that all measured items were reliable for further analysis.

Findings

The study confirmed that professionals within the GCI are aware of the existence of UBs and revealed that the most prevalent ethical conducts exhibited, namely, level of accuracy, accountability, honesty, reliability, fairness and respect for colleagues. Common unethical conducts exhibited included: favouritism, bribery and corruption, professional negligence, falsification, fraud and overbilling.

Research limitations/implications

The study reported on the dominant ethical conduct among built environment professionals. The claims put forward in the analysis are, thus, affected by Ghana’s social, economic and political environments, which could restrict the generalization of the findings.

Practical implications

Incipient findings presented from this research will guide stakeholders to develop and device strategies that will aid alleviate persistent ethical issues within the built environment.

Social implications

The study highlights individuals’ perspectives on ethical issues persistent in the built environment. The findings suggest individuals adhere to ethical practices in a project environment by the evidence presented.

Originality/value

This pioneering study is a novel assessment on EBs and UBs of built environment professionals in the GCI. The study supplementary adds value to the literature on ethical and unethical practices. By identifying these practices, construction firms have a competitive edge in combating UB and promoting EB among built environment professionals in the GCI.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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