Search results

1 – 10 of 10
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Ayalla Ruvio and Zehava Rosenblatt

In light of environmental and organizational trends toward privatization, and in response to changes in sectoral traditional differences, this paper investigated job…

1073

Abstract

In light of environmental and organizational trends toward privatization, and in response to changes in sectoral traditional differences, this paper investigated job insecurity (JI) of secondary schoolteachers in the public and private sectors in Israel. The study sample consisted of 326 Israeli schoolteachers. Using a multi‐dimensional measure of JI, where various job facets were addressed, two distinct JI profiles were found: public‐sector schoolteachers tended to emphasize intrinsic job features, while private‐sector schoolteachers tended to emphasize extrinsic ones. Sectoral differences were also found in regard to the adverse effect of JI on work attitudes: in the public sector JI affected organizational commitment, perceived organizational support, and tendency to quit, and in the private sector only tendency to quit was affected. These findings are partly explained by differences in employment structures, and have implications for human resource strategies regarding the provision of job security.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Ayalla Ruvio, Aviv Shoham and Maja Makovec Brenčič

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate cross‐culturally a short‐form, consumers' need for uniqueness (CNFU) scale. The length of the original scale (31…

7484

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate cross‐culturally a short‐form, consumers' need for uniqueness (CNFU) scale. The length of the original scale (31 items) might have hindered its diffusion in research when questionnaire length and respondent fatigue are major considerations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses survey‐based data from Israel, Slovenia, and the Palestinian Authority and uses a combination of statistical techniques, such as EFA, CFA, and structural equation modeling.

Findings

In general, support was found for the cross‐cultural reliability and validity of the new, short‐form CNFU scale.

Research limitations/implications

Future research can use the short‐form scale with additional confidence in its cross‐cultural reliability and validity.

Practical implications

First, since CNFU appears not to be culturally bound, marketers can identify cross‐country segments of high‐CNFU individuals and use standardized marketing campaigns to reach them. Second, marketers of unique products can use the antecedents identified in this study to develop and encourage CNFU. Third, the findings can be used to design advertising campaigns such as by emphasizing the social context of consumption of high‐uniqueness products.

Originality/value

An original and first presentation of a cross‐cultural validation of a parsimonious CNFU scale.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Sigal Segev, Ayalla Ruvio, Aviv Shoham and Dalia Velan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of acculturation on immigrant consumers’ loyalty. The authors posit that the acculturation orientation of immigrants…

1810

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of acculturation on immigrant consumers’ loyalty. The authors posit that the acculturation orientation of immigrants determines their consumer loyalty to both ethnic and mainstream brands and stores.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of Hispanic consumers in the USA and consumers from the former Soviet Union in Israel, this study tests a model in which two acculturation continua, original culture maintenance and host culture adaptation, serve as antecedents for immigrants’ consumer loyalty.

Findings

Acculturation determines the extent of immigrants’ consumer loyalty. Both acculturation continua are associated with distinct loyalty patterns that are similar across the two immigrant groups.

Research limitations/implications

Despite sampling limitations, the paper demonstrates that immigrants’ acculturation orientation influences their loyalty to ethnic and mainstream brands and stores. Shared by ethnic consumers in two culturally diverse markets, this relationship transcends geographic boundaries.

Practical implications

The results provide insights for marketers with respect to the development of segmentation and positioning strategies and tactical implementations that address the preferences of ethnic consumers.

Social implications

This paper highlights the importance of understanding the unique needs of ethnic consumers and addressing them. Successful integration of immigrant consumers into the marketplace can also help in their integration into the host society at large.

Originality/value

Findings shed light on the commonalities and differences among immigrant groups in different national settings. The paper highlights the role of cultural transition as a key experience that affects immigrants regardless of specific environmental or situational circumstances.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 48 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Ruth Segev, Aviv Shoham and Ayalla Ruvio

Previous research on impression management explored motives, the use of impression management tactics and the influence of personality characteristics on the tendency to…

2339

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research on impression management explored motives, the use of impression management tactics and the influence of personality characteristics on the tendency to engage in impression management. The purposes of this research are to examine gift‐giving behavior among adolescents based on the building blocks of impression management theory, the ways that personality characteristics motivate gift‐givers to engage in active and defensive impression management and how the use of impression management tactics (i.e. similarity‐conformity and target‐enhancement) are reflected in their gift‐giving behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenience sample of 141 adolescences was used in a quantitative study. Self‐report questionnaires were distributed to adolescents of different ages (13‐16), with students from diverse social strata. Students were asked to recall a recent peer gift‐giving experience and to refer to it when answering the questions which covered motives for gift‐giving, personality characteristics, and the characteristics of the gift.

Findings

The authors' study shows that personality characteristics such as public self‐consciousness, self‐monitoring, and self‐esteem are positively related with gift‐giving motives. Additionally, gift‐giving motives are positively related with the use of similarity‐conformity and target‐enhancement tactics. Finally, the use of impression management tactics reflects adolescents' special characteristics, such as their tendency towards conformism, important role of peers in their lives, and their high need to protect and nurture these social resources.

Originality/value

This research explored the instrumental role of gift‐giving among adolescents and contributes to the existing literatures on gift‐giving, impression management, and adolescents' consumer behavior.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Aviv Shoham, Ayalla Ruvio and Moshe Davidow

This paper seeks to assess the impact of consumer ethics and their piracy attitudes on piracy behaviors. The extent of such piracy is difficult to estimate because no…

6383

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to assess the impact of consumer ethics and their piracy attitudes on piracy behaviors. The extent of such piracy is difficult to estimate because no worldwide statistics are available, but conservative estimates indicate that it costs manufacturers billions of dollars.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted using Israeli consumers through a structured questionnaire. Data were analyzed mostly through regression models.

Findings

Attitudes to piracy served as a partial mediator of the impacts of consumer morals and ethics on actual piracy.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitation is the use of a convenience sample and future research should replicate and extend this study using random samples.

Practical implications

First, firms should advertise piracy as unethical. This would result in recognition of unethical piracy behavior by some part of the population. For piracy reduction, such people should recognize the need to “balance the ethical book” within the same context of behavior. In other words, if they have pirated from a company in the past, such people should be encouraged to purchase from the same company in the future.

Originality/value

The paper assesses the impact of consumer ethics and their piracy attitudes and behaviors.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 January 2010

Yossi Gavish, Aviv Shoham and Ayalla Ruvio

The purposes of this research are to examine the extent to which daughters view their mothers as consumption role models, the extent to which daughters serve as…

2710

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this research are to examine the extent to which daughters view their mothers as consumption role models, the extent to which daughters serve as consumption role models for their mothers, and the extent to which external role models are shared by mothers and their adolescent daughters.

Design/methodology/approach

Two qualitative studies focused on mothers‐adolescent daughters‐vicarious role models interactions as drivers of consumption behaviors in Western cultures. Study 1 included 20 in‐depth interviews with mothers and their adolescent daughters (conducted separately). Study 2 included five of the original dyads interviewed jointly and observed in fashion stores.

Findings

Regarding adolescent daughters' use as role models and fashion markers for their mothers, most mothers confirmed that their adolescent daughters' fashion opinion was very important. Second, based on consumer socialization arguments, mothers served as role models for their adolescent daughters. Most dyads shop for fashion items together and in the same stores. Regarding the issue of cognitive versus chronological ages, the studies suggest that there is a gap between mothers' cognitive and chronological ages in support of cognitive age theory and the youthfulness ideal of Western cultures. Notably, such a gap mostly failed to materialize for adolescent daughters. Hence, consumption similarity appears to be driven more by the gap for mothers than the gap for daughters. Finally, external role models such as celebrities did not have a great influence on mothers or their adolescent daughters.

Originality/value

The research used in‐depth interviews with and in‐store observation of mothers and adolescent daughters. Future research might use similar interviews with younger daughters. Another extension of the work reported here that can provide triangulation for the findings is to change from a qualitative to a quantitative methodology.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

878

Abstract

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Abstract

Details

Continuing to Broaden the Marketing Concept
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-824-4

Article
Publication date: 15 November 2021

Gianfranco Walsh

This research examines the direct and indirect effects of immigrant consumers' (heritage vs host) cultural orientation on their opinion leadership, in relation to heritage…

Abstract

Purpose

This research examines the direct and indirect effects of immigrant consumers' (heritage vs host) cultural orientation on their opinion leadership, in relation to heritage versus host culture peers. In addition to examining the potential mediation of different exhibitions of innovativeness, the research tests whether the relative size of the immigrant population in a country might affect the relationship of consumers' cultural orientation and opinion leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

Tests of the theoretical arguments rely on data from three samples of more than 1,000 consumers collected from Russian immigrants to three countries–Israel, Germany and the United States.

Findings

This study offers broad support for the foundational theorizing, in that the findings confirm a mediating role of consumer innovativeness. Cultural orientation relates directly to opinion leadership, though only in two countries with a relatively small (Russian) immigrant population, that is, Germany and the United States. Accordingly, these findings have pertinent theoretical and practical implications.

Originality/value

Little research centers on opinion leaders among immigrant consumer segments or details the antecedents of opinion leadership relative to ethnic and immigrant consumer segments. This study contributes to marketing theory and practice by investigating immigrants from Russia who have migrated to Israel, Germany or the United States and by elucidating whether and to what extent their heritage versus host culture orientations exert indirect (via innovativeness) or direct impacts on their opinion leadership, expressed toward heritage and host culture peers.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 January 2019

Reto Felix and Jacob Almaguer

Researchers have become increasingly interested in the construct of psychological ownership in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to extend the target of…

1275

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers have become increasingly interested in the construct of psychological ownership in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to extend the target of psychological ownership to planet Earth as a whole and investigate its relationship with materialism and pro-environmental behavioral intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a survey with 236 college students from a public university in the Southeast of the USA. The model fit from a confirmatory factor analysis is very satisfactory. Mediation of psychological ownership for the planet is formally tested using structural equation modeling (SEM) and Hayes’ (2013) macro for SPSS.

Findings

The findings of this paper support the expectation that both the individual (my planet) and the collective-oriented dimensions (our planet) of individual-level psychological ownership are positively related to recycling intentions and the intention to purchase green products. Further, formal mediation tests show that psychological ownership for my planet, but not for our planet, mediates the relationship between material values and pro-environmental behaviors.

Practical implications

Companies that aim to gain competitive advantage through green citizenship can highlight the individual or shared ownership of the planet to align the political agenda of government officials with their company mission, vision and brand positioning.

Originality/value

The current paper contributes to the emerging body of literature on psychological ownership by extending its target to planet Earth as a whole. It is the first paper to explain the previously observed negative relationship between materialism and pro-environmental behaviors through the mechanism of psychological ownership.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

1 – 10 of 10